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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 66 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. A. Reynolds or search for J. A. Reynolds in all documents.

Your search returned 35 results in 7 document sections:

d I ordered Baird and Kilpatrick to move from Reynolds, in the direction of Waynesboro, with a view elve-pounder Napoleons, under charge of Major J. A. Reynolds, Chief of Artillery. The horses were iief Quartermaster,410  Horses reported by Major Reynolds, Chief of Artillery,40  Horses put into tptain Whittelsey,1,020  Mules reported by Major Reynolds,100  Mules put into trains in exchange forn taken east of Atlanta,lbs.1,932,468 By Major Reynolds's Report,lbs.130,000     Pounds corn, 3,aptain Whittelsey's Report,lbs.550,694 By Major Reynolds's Report,lbs.20,000    Pounds rice fodden actual returns to Captain Whittelsey and Major Reynolds, will be increased over seven hundred thoudnance Officer Artillery, as per report of Major Reynolds, Chief of Artillery: Rounds fixed ammunp's Primers,2 Pounds of powder,2,000 Major Reynolds reports the number of guns, of all calibrene occupied by the corps before Savannah. Major Reynolds's report, forwarded herewith, will furn
of twelve-pounder Napoleons, under charge of Major J. A. Reynolds, Chief of Artillery. The horses were increay, Chief Quartermaster,410  Horses reported by Major Reynolds, Chief of Artillery,40  Horses put into teams by Captain Whittelsey,1,020  Mules reported by Major Reynolds,100  Mules put into trains in exchange for poo  Corn taken east of Atlanta,lbs.1,932,468 By Major Reynolds's Report,lbs.130,000     Pounds corn, 3,290,4 By Captain Whittelsey's Report,lbs.550,694 By Major Reynolds's Report,lbs.20,000    Pounds rice fodder, 57ade on actual returns to Captain Whittelsey and Major Reynolds, will be increased over seven hundred thousand d, Ordnance Officer Artillery, as per report of Major Reynolds, Chief of Artillery: Rounds fixed ammunition Sharp's Primers,2 Pounds of powder,2,000 Major Reynolds reports the number of guns, of all calibres, fohe line occupied by the corps before Savannah. Major Reynolds's report, forwarded herewith, will furnish
Doc. 4. reports of the artillery brigade. Major Reynolds's Report. headquarters artillery brigade, Twentieth corps, Savannah, Georunition was left here by the enemy. Respectfully submitted. J. A. Reynolds. Major and Chief of Artillery Twentieth Corps. List of Guable, 76   Unserviceable, 13--89 Respectfully submitted. J. A. Reynolds, Major and Chief of Artillery, Twentieth Corps. Captain Wi the morning of November thirteenth, when we were ordered by Major J. A. Reynolds to report to Brigadier-General Geary, commanding Second divirtillery. On the morning of the eleventh day of December, Major J. A. Reynolds again directed me to move my battery on the Savannah River, ity, on the tenth day of December. On the twelfth, by order of Major Reynolds, the battery was moved on the river-bank, opposite the head of fell to my command. On the fourteenth instant, by command of Major Reynolds, I sent Lieutenant King, with a section, to report to Colonel R
s, burned; two thousand three hundred muskets, smooth bore, calibre sixty-nine, burned; three hundred sets accoutrements, burned; ten thousand rounds ammuniion, calibre sixty-nine, burned; five thousand lances, burned; one thousand five hundred cutlasses, burned; fifteen boxes United States standard weights and measures, burned; sixteen hogsheads salt, thrown into the river; one hundred and seventy boxes fixed ammunition, and two hundred kegs powder. Turned over all that was valuable to Major Reynolds, and threw the balance into the river. About one thousand five hundred pounds tobacco were distributed among the troops. A large quantity of cotton-say one thousand eight hundred bales--was disposed of by General Sherman; manner not made known to me. One large three-story building in the square, near the State House, was burned, together with a large number of miscellaneous articles, as parts of harness and saddles, a repairshop, with all the necessary tools for repairing all kinds of
undred yards, and materially aided the column in crossing the bridge. My command were spectators only of the fight at Reynolds's plantation, being in reserve. After the battle, again took the rear, and I must say that that night's march was the mho did it well, and destroyed the bridge after our troops were over. General Kilpatrick moved with the First brigade to Reynolds's plantation, and too up position and barricaded, where I was ordered to join him with my brigade, and did so, going intd, skilfully and gallantly kept them in check until the advance battalion had been assigned position with the brigade at Reynolds's plantation. At this moment the enemy charged in two columns with vigor. Captain Rossman, with his battalion, reinforth of November last, yet displayed the most admirable gallantry during the campaign, but more especially at Buckhead and Reynolds's plantation. The service is not ornamented with more worthy captains. Captain Dalzell and Lieutenant Coates, of the
it. In the charge near McGee's house, Colonel Allen, of the Second Virginia infantry, fell, at the head of his regiment. Five guns, numerous small-arms, and many prisoners, were among the fruits of this rapid and resistless advance. General Reynolds and an officer of his staff, who lingered on this side of the river, after the Federal troops had crossed over, were among the number of prisoners. The Second brigade, by request of General Wilcox, was removed to a point of woods about halfo fell mortally wounded in the charge of the thirtieth; Adjutant Williams, Captain Fauntleroy, Captain Saunders, Captain Rice, Captain Roy, Captain Jett, Captain Healy, Captain Lawson, and Captain Alexander, and Lieutenants Brockenbrough, Roane, Reynolds, Davis, Healy, and Street; particularly Captain Fauntleroy and Lieutenants Brockenbrough and Roane. The General's attention is also called to the following named non-commissioned officers and privates: Sergeant-Major Mallory; Color-Sergeant F
ents of the despatch. Executing this order in the direction of Manassas, he was taken prisoner, and I lost his services, which were valuable. The intercepted despatch was an order from Major-General McDowell to Major-General Sigel and Brigadier-General Reynolds, conveying the order of attack on Manassas Junction. Sigel was ordered to march on that point from Gainesville, with his right resting on the Manassas Gap Railroad; Reynolds, moving also from Gainesville, to keep his left on the WarrenReynolds, moving also from Gainesville, to keep his left on the Warrenton road ; and another division was ordered to move in support of the two, in rear en echelon to each. Finding, then, I should have a superior force on me in a short time, I ordered Major John Seddon, First Virginia battalion, with his command and the Forty-eighth Virginia, to take position on the road from Grovoton toward Manassas, to guard against any flank movement on me from thence. The Forty-second Virginia, Captain Penn, I threw forward as skirmishers, and held the Twenty-first, Captain