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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 53 15 Browse Search
John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865. You can also browse the collection for John P. Reynolds or search for John P. Reynolds in all documents.

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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 1: organization of the regiment. (search)
hen the Regiment was mustered into the United States Service, five of these Drill Masters were commissioned as Lieutenants, viz: John Hodges, Jr. to Co. B; John P. Reynolds, Jr. to Co. D; Henry A. Hale to Co. H; George W. Batchelder, to Co. C; and Wm. L. Palmer to Co. I. The Staff and Line were commissioned on Aug. 22. The rostr, of Salem; Second Lieut., Samuel S. Prime, of Rowley. Company D. Captain, James D. Russell, of Boston; First Lieut., Moncena Dunn, of Roxbury; Second Lieut., John P. Reynolds, Jr., of Salem. Company E. Captain, Andrew Mahoney, of Boston; First Lieut., David Lee, of Lancaster, Pa.; Second Lieut., George M. Barry, of Boston.ry A. Hale. 7. Eugene Kelty. 8. James H. Rice. 9. Levi Shaw, Quartermaster. 10. John C. Chadwick, Adjt. 11. David Lee. Second Lieutenants. 1. John P. Reynolds, Jr. 2. Isaac H. Boyd. 3. James G. C. Dodge. 4. William L. Palmer. 5. Dudley (C. Mumford. 6. Edward P. Bishop. 7. James T. Lurvey. 8. Samuel S. Prime
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 4: the balls Bluff disaster. (search)
een used had fallen into the hands of the rebels. Col. Devens swam across the river, despite his wound, and Lieut. John P. Reynolds, Jr. assisted him up the bank. Some strong swimmers, divesting themselves of most of their clothing, succeeded in y on the bluff, Col. Hinks, who retained command of the troops on the island, determined to do something to stop it. Lieut. Reynolds was detailed, with 16 men, to proceed under cover of the darkness to the front of the island, dig a number of holes,in a heap like lumps of putty, until the clouds again shut out the moon and the work was resumed and completed, said Lieut. Reynolds, in telling of the affair. No one was hurt, and when the digging was completed, the men replied to the rebels' shToward night the burial party returned and as soon as Capt. Vaughn had landed, he placed his arms around the neck of Lieut. Reynolds, exclaiming Horrible, Horrible, and in this position the two walked for some distance toward headquarters, the capta
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 6: removal to Muddy Branch. (search)
nd Lieut. Isaac H. Boyd was commissioned First Lieutenant in that Company. In Company D, Sergeant Major Samuel Baxter was made Second Lieutenant, Second Lieutenant John P. Reynolds was made First Lieutenant and Acting Adjutant and transferred from Company D to G. In Co. K. Second Lieut. Edward P. Bishop was promoted to Firstld ignite the quickmatch and the signal would be fired like a bengola light. The first signal issued to the Nineteenth regiment is now in the possession of Capt. Reynolds. These signals were in vogue before the organization of the signal corps, which afterward became a separate, distinct and efficient branch of the service and112, made by motions of the flag. The night challenge is Red-White, the reply being White. ( This signal, not being used, became void, and is preserved by Captain Reynolds among his war souvenirs.) These colors designated by the outer wrapper on the signal cartridge, correspond with the instructions in the little folded cocked
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 7: the winter at Muddy Branch. (search)
Chapter 7: the winter at Muddy Branch. The evenings at headquarters were often interesting. There was plenty of time to study, discuss and exemplify the tactics and regulations. Acting Adjutant Reynolds had a wooden regiment, made and sent to him by his father, and these were frequently brought into use to demonstrate a movement in the tactics. This series of blocks is still preserved among his army collection. Major Howe, or Jack Howe, as he was called, and Dr. J. Franklin Dyer, the K. Davis, Company D; Edward Z. Braley, Company D; Michael Sullivan, Company E. First. Lieut. George W. Bachelder, of Company C, was made the Acting Regimental Adjutant while at Muddy Branch, from January 4th, during the absence of First Lieut. John P. Reynolds, on leave. On Feb. 21st, dress parade was had and Col. Hinks presided for the first time in four months. The regimental band played Home Sweet Home after dismissal, and many a boy wished he was there. A detachment of 32 recruits
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 16: the march down the Peninsula. (search)
Chapter 16: the march down the Peninsula. On the 16th of August the order to pack up was received and the baggage was sent down the river to Fortress Monroe. The train of the Third Brigade, Second Division, Second Corps was placed in charge of Lieut. John P. Reynolds, Jr., and Lieut. John G. B. Adams of the Nineteenth Massachusetts regiment. At five o'clock in the afternoon, the regiment fell in, ready for the march, but the final orders did not arrive until nine o'clock the following morning. The regiment bivouacked on the parade ground during the night and the march for Yorktown was begun at 9.00 A. M. The troops went by one route and the wagon trains by another. These trains extended a distance of 40 miles in a single line. The march down the Peninsula, as a whole, was not hard, although the dust was so thick that the men could not see five paces in front of them. The road was lined with dead horses and the weather was very hot, although pleasant. The country through
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 17: to South Mountain and Antietam. (search)
move. The regiment marched through Frederick City on Sept. 12, two days after the Confederates had left it, and camped on the outskirts. Here the command was brought into close column by division, and a rigid order against foraging was read. Lee's proclamation of a few days before had been couched in terms which he thought would cause the citizens of Maryland to rally about the Confederate flag and it was probably thought wise to restrain any undue trespass by the Union forces. Lieut. Reynolds had brought with him from the Peninsula a colored boy named Henry Johnson who had acquired a reputation for keeping the officers of the Lieutenant's mess well supplied with the necessities of life. While the Adjutant was reading this order prohibiting foraging, Henry was seen coming toward the regiment, showing his ivory and toting an earthen pot of butter under each arm, fresh from a neighboring dairy or spring house. The effort to beckon him out of the way was comical but strategic.
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 18: the battle of Antietam. (search)
moved on out of the woods and over a field strewn with the dead and wounded of both armies. During this advance, First Lieut. Reynolds, of Company G, stumbled over a dead Confederate color sergeant. He stooped and snatched the Cross Jack or Saltieomoted to be First Lieutenant for his bravery in this action. Capt. Henry A. Hale, Lieut. Albert Thorndike, Lieut. John P. Reynolds, Jr. and Lieut. Elisha A. Hinks were wounded. At an early part of the fight Lieut. Reynolds was wounded in the ankLieut. Reynolds was wounded in the ankle and was ordered to the rear by Lieut. Col. Devereux. He hobbled back to his company, however, and stayed long enough to receive another wound, this time in the elbow of his sword arm. Col. Devereux said later, jokingly, that it served him just rrivate Joseph C. James, leg. Private William Smith, shoulder. Private Frederick P. Turner, head. Co. G.First Lieutenant John P. Reynolds, Jr., ankle and elbow. First Sergeant Joseph Marshall, shoulder. Sergeant Jeremiah C. Cronan, hand. Sergea
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 19: at Bolivar Heights. (search)
d to major; Capt. Ansel D. Wass was discharged to enable him to be commissioned as Lieutenant Colonel of the 41st Massachusetts regiment; First Lieut. William L. Palmer, of Company I, was appointed Adjutant, vice John C. Chadwick, promoted to Captain of Company C in place of Capt. Bachelder killed in action. First Lieut. Oliver F. Briggs, of Company K, was made Regimental Quartermaster, vice Shaw discharged. First Lieut. Isaac H. Boyd was in command of Company A; Capt. Hale and First Lieut. Reynolds, of Company G were absent on account of wounds, and Second Lieut. Thomas Claffey was in command. Company C had John C. Chadwick, formerly Adjutant of the regiment as Captain, and Edgar M. Newcomb as First Lieutenant. In Company E First Lieut. Elisha A. Hinks who had been transferred from Company B, was absent from wounds. Capt. James H. Rice, of Company F, who had been promoted from First Lieutenant, vice Edmund Rice, promoted to Major, was absent from wounds, and the comman
back in the rear of Hancock's advancing line. A little while the anxious forces held in reserve await the reforming of the broken Ninth, Then word comes that Reynolds has turned the enemy's right, and they hope,—and wait. Then they hear that Reynolds has not been supported and has lost what he so bravely won. Then Hancock iReynolds has not been supported and has lost what he so bravely won. Then Hancock is moving again. Steadily and swiftly his gallant forces near the rebel works. Again pelts that storm of shell upon the open plain. Again opens that rain of Hell from the Sunken Road in front. Again the line of blue staggers up that grassy slope, to melt away at the foot of the hill and fall back, shattered, bleeding and breath Dodge, absent, wounded Dec. 13. 2nd Lieut. David T. Chubbuck in command of Company. Co. E.Capt. Andrew Mahoney, absent, severely wounded Dec. 13. 1st Lieut. John P. Reynolds, Jr., absent, wounded Sept. 17, transferred from Co. B. 2nd Lieut. Ephraim A. Hall, Jr., promoted from Sergeant Major to date Oct. 14, vice Crofts, dropp
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 27: the Gettysburg Campaign. (search)
D. Wass, appointed and commissioned by Gov. Andrew May 23, 1863. First Lieut. William A. Hill, appointed adjutant, vice Palmer, promoted, to date April 15, 1863. Co. A., First Lieut. Warner A. Tilton, promoted from Second Lieutenant, vice Reynolds, promoted, to date Feb. 27, but refused muster on account of sickness. Second Lieut. Sherman S. Robinson, promoted from Sergeant Co. A., vice Donath, promoted, to late April 4. Co. C., Capt. William L. Palmer, promoted from Adjutant, vice d Lieutenant, vice Dodge, promoted, to date April 4. Co. D., Second Lieut. William E. Barrows, promoted from Hospital Steward, vice Stone, promoted, to date March 25, 1863. On detached service, Third Brigade, A. A. D. C. Co. E., Capt. John P. Reynolds, Jr., absent sick on Surgeon's Certificate for wounds, promoted from First Lieutenant, vice Chadwick, discharged, to date Feb. 26. Co. F., First Lieut. William H. Stone, promoted from Second Lieutenant, vice Bishop, dismissed, to date Ma
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