Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for William Reynolds or search for William Reynolds in all documents.

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road. 9:40 A. M. Two batteries playing on Reynolds' advance, in rear of his first line, cause hiadly, but not dangerously wounded. later. Reynolds has been forced to develop his whole line — aion is now getting into position. That done, Reynolds will order Meade to advance. Batteries over the enemy's position in the woods in front of Reynolds' left. He thinks the effect will be to promoorning. 1 P. M. Enemy opened a battery on Reynolds, enfilading Meade. Reynolds has opened all hReynolds has opened all his batteries on it. No report yet. Reynolds hotly engaged at this moment. Will report in a few momeReynolds hotly engaged at this moment. Will report in a few moments again. 1:15 P. M. Heavy engagement of infantry where battery is. Meade is assaulting the hilds in his front; seems to be able to hold on. Reynolds will push Gibbon in, if necessary. The batte gone in. Will report soon again. 3 P. M. Reynolds seems to be holding his own. Things look bettextreme left. The accompanying report of General Reynolds will give more in detail the work of Gene[1 more...]
9:40 A. M. Two batteries playing on Reynolds' advance, in rear of his first line, cause him to desist the advance. They are on the Bowlin Green road, near the river. They must be silenced before he can advance. Heavy firing in our front.
later. Reynolds has been forced to develop his whole line — an attack of some force of enemy's troops on our left seems probable, as far as can now be judged. Stoneman has been directed to cross one division to support our left. Report of cavalry pickets from the other side of the river, that the enemy's troops were moving down the river on this side during the latter part of the night. Howe's pickets reported movements in their front, same direction. Still they have a strong force well posted with batteries her
12 M. Birney's division is now getting into position. That done, Reynolds will order Meade to advance. Batteries over the river are to shell the enemy's position in the woods in front of Reynolds' left. He thinks the effect will be to promote Meade's advance. A column of the enemy's infantry is passing along the crest of the hills from right to left, as we look at it.12 M. Birney's division is now getting into position. That done, Reynolds will order Meade to advance. Batteries over the river are to shell the enemy's position in the woods in front of Reynolds' left. He thinks the effect will be to promote Meade's advance. A column of the enemy's infantry is passing along the crest of the hills from right to left, as we look at it.
1 P. M. Enemy opened a battery on Reynolds, enfilading Meade. Reynolds has opened all his batteries on it. No report yet. Reynolds hotly engaged at this moment. Will report in a few moments again.1 P. M. Enemy opened a battery on Reynolds, enfilading Meade. Reynolds has opened all his batteries on it. No report yet. Reynolds hotly engaged at this moment. Will report in a few moments again.1 P. M. Enemy opened a battery on Reynolds, enfilading Meade. Reynolds has opened all his batteries on it. No report yet. Reynolds hotly engaged at this moment. Will report in a few moments again.
1:25 P. M. Meade is in the woods in his front; seems to be able to hold on. Reynolds will push Gibbon in, if necessary. The battery and woods referred to must be near Hamilton's house. The infantry firing is prolonged and quite heavy. Things look well enough: men in fine spirits.
2:15 P. M. Gibbon and Meade driven back from the wood. Newton gone forward. Jackson's corps of the enemy attacks on the left. General Gibbon slightly wounded. General Bayard mortally wounded by a shell. Things do not look so well on Reynolds' front; still we'll have new troops in soon.
3 P. M. Reynolds seems to be holding his own. Things look better somewhat.
once the famous McNair's), now commanded by the rebel General Reynolds. The brigade consists of the First and Second Arkadivision would have to bear the brunt of the engagement. Reynolds' brigade had been previously ordered up, and were lying origade had expended forty rounds of ammunition, each man. Reynolds' brigade was now ordered to relieve them, and giving a ye much to the right, and destroyed all connection with General Reynolds. He attacked the enemy and drove him from his front enemy from his front, sweeping towards his centre, while Reynolds' brigade of Stevenson's division was ordered to advance art was making his movement a peremptory order reached General Reynolds for him to advance his command as a pivot. The Generd proved themselves to be able officers. Generals Brown, Reynolds, Clayton, Baker, Gibson, and Stovall, exhibited the greatll soon be able to return to duty as Inspector-General of Reynolds' brigade, for his services are very valuable. Captain
Pigeon Mountain, I was directed, on the morning of the nineteenth instant, to make a reconnoissance below Lee and Gordon's Mills, on the Chickamauga Creek, in the State of Georgia, which I did, and found the enemy in force, and on receiving orders I withdrew the brigade, joined the column, and with it moved upon the enemy, into an open woodland to the right of the road leading towards Chattanooga. My position happened to be on a small elevation, General Cruft's brigade to my left, and General Reynolds' division on my right. We met the enemy's lines about twelve o'clock M. My brigade was formed in double lines; the Twenty-fourth Ohio Colonel Higgins, and Twenty-third Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel Foy, in the front line; the Thirty-sixth Indiana, Lieutenant-Colonel Cary, and the Eighty-fourth Illinois, Colonel Waters, in the rear line; the Sixth Ohio, Colonel Anderson, in reserve. On meeting the enemy with the front line, the troops on the right of my brigade gave way, and the Thirty-
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