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Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 18: the turning of a long lane. (search)
sojournment laws, the enactment of personal liberty laws, the increasing preference manifested by Whig and by Democratic electors for antislavery Whig, and anti-slavery Democratic leaders. Seward and Chase, and Hale and Hamlin, Thaddeus Stevens and Joshua R. Giddings, were all in Congress in 1849. A revolution was working in the North; a revolution was working in the South. New and bolder spirits were rising to leadership in both sections. On the Southern stage were Jefferson Davis, Barnwell Rhett, David Atchison, Howell Cobb, Robert Toombs, and James M. Mason. The outlook was portentous, tempestuous. The tide of excitement culuminated in the crisis of 1850. The extraordinary activity of the underground railroad system, and its failure to open the national Territories to slave immigration had transported the South to the verge of disunion. California, fought over by the two foes, was in the act of withdrawing herself from the field of contention to a position of independent
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Index. (search)
ease, Elizabeth, 303, 331, 346. Pennsylvania Hall, 257-260. Phelps, Amos A., 149, 186, 203,278,280, 288. Phillips Academy (Andover), 190. Phillips, Ann Green, 292, 293. Phillips, Wendell, 190, 257, 310, 317, 323, 3-6, 344, 346-347, 349, 351, 386,387, 388, 393,394. Pillsbury, Parker, 310, Prentice, George D., 120. Purvis, Robert, 144, 162, 178. Quincy, Edmund, 299, 310, 316, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327-329. Quincy, Josiah, 347. Rankin, John, 177. Remond, Charles Lenox, 293, 295, 304. Rhett, Barnwell, 338. Rogers, Nathaniel P., 149, 293, 295, 301. Rynders, Isaiah, 341-344. Scoble, Rev. John, 294. Sewall, Samuel E., 900, 91, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 175, 236, 367. Seward, William H., 338, 372. Shaw, Chief-Justice, 312. Slavery, Rise and Progress of, 95-107. Smith, Gerritt, 147, 236, 297, 320. Sprague, Peleg, 213, 214. Stanton, Edwin M., 382. Stanton, Henry B., 253, 288. Stearns, Charles, 359. Stevens, Thaddeus, 338. Stuart, Charles, 201, 202, 264. Sumner, Charles,
Charleston, says: "A duel was fought near here on the 5th, between Col. W. Ransom Calhoun, Commander at Fort Sumter and a nephew of the great John C., and Major Rhett, son of Barnwell Rhett, which resulted in the death of the former. Col. Calhoun graduated at West Point in 1850, and ranked high as a military leader. Major Rand Major Rhett, son of Barnwell Rhett, which resulted in the death of the former. Col. Calhoun graduated at West Point in 1850, and ranked high as a military leader. Major Rhett is much esteemed and should be continue in the army, rises to the place made vacant by the death of Col. Calhoun, both being in the same regiment. " and Major Rhett, son of Barnwell Rhett, which resulted in the death of the former. Col. Calhoun graduated at West Point in 1850, and ranked high as a military leader. Major Rhett is much esteemed and should be continue in the army, rises to the place made vacant by the death of Col. Calhoun, both being in the same regiment. "
Death of Galt the Sculptor --Alexander Galt, the well-known scripture, died at his residence, in this city, on yesterday, of small pox. The deceased was an artist of no inconsiderable intent and had built himself up a reputation for Boldness of design and decency of finish that favorably compared with that of any contemporary artist in either the Old World or the New. Mr. Galt was quite a young man, and his life has gone out just as it was launched upon a brilliant career. His more prominent works had a trans-Atlantic reputation.--Among the works in marble of which the deceased artist was the author was Payche Bazchante and a statue of Jefferson. He had executed in plaster basts of President Davis, Governor Letcher, and Hon. Barnwell Rhett, of S. C. His last work was a bas relief of General Stonewall Jackson.
other sources, we learn that Gen. Shield's army went up James river on Tuesday to reinforce McClellan. Our Washington dispatches state that a cavalry officer from Fredericksburg reported heavy cannonading heard all day on Wednesday, in the direction of Richmond; that at night the sky was strongly illuminated with lurid light, and on Thursday (yesterday morning,) there was a great smoke to the south, as if from some dense conflagration. The death of Stonewall Jackson, and also of Gen. Barnwell Rhett, of South Carolina, is announced in a Richmond paper. From this sketch of the day's dispatches, and from the letters of our correspondents, (elsewhere printed) the reader can get all the light available to the public in regard to the great contest before Richmond. But the manner in which information has been conveyed, and the hesitancy on all sides about publication, is not calculated to inspire a lively faith in any statement. Proceedings in the Yankee Senate. In the Y