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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Stephen Elliott, Lieutenant James A. Hamilton, and Elliott's torpedoes. (search)
g Lieutenant James A. Hamilton in charge of one he took the other. A dark night found the two fleet boats gliding abreast and about two hundred feet apart down towards the vessels that lay head to an ebb tide. A pair of torpedoes were sent on their mission; one of the vessels, the smaller, with a crew of about thirty, was blown to atoms. Excepting the actors in this affair no one knew of it; Captain Elliott kept his own counsel, and was the more successful for it. After the removal of Colonel Rhett to another field of service Colonel Stephen Elliott was placed in charge of Fort Sumter. How he floated masses of ranging timber down the harbor at night and dragged it through the rear ports; how he created a frame and filled it in with debris; how he unpaved the streets of Charleston, and set the cobble-stones outside of his unique parapet, and how he flung out a new and defiant flag over the fort within a fort, is for a gifted pen. Elliott, the genius of war, lifted the drooping cres
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A grand meeting in New Orleans on the 25th of April in behalf of the Southern Historical Society. (search)
rposed publishing in this number, but that the printer warns us that we will not have room. They will appear next month. The meeting was, in every way, a magnificent success, and its pecuniary results — a full statement of which we will publish in our next — were in the highest degree gratifying. Our especial thanks are tendered to the committee of ladies--Mrs. Percy Roberts, Mrs. Alfred Roman, Mrs. F. N. Ogden, Mrs. Francis T. Nicholls, Mrs. W. A. Johnson, Mrs. S. H. Boyd, and Miss Claudine Rhett--whose indifatigable labors were so essential to the success of the meeting--Judge Walter H. Rogers, who, to his reputation as a gallant soldier, now adds that of the able and pure jurist--ex-Governor F. T. Nicholls, the maimed veteran who serves his country and the cause of truth as faithfully now as when he followed the standard of Lee and Jackson--ex-President Davis, the able statesman, pure patriot and finished orator, who has always given to the Society his warm sympathy and read
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of John C. Mitchel, of Ireland, killed whilst in command of Fort Sumter. (search)
Sketch of John C. Mitchel, of Ireland, killed whilst in command of Fort Sumter. By Miss Claudine Rhett. No one can read that simple sounding name, who knows anything of the modern history of Ireland and South Carolina, without feeling their hearts stir with thoughts and memories of patriotism, devotion and valor. We look back upon the past, and pause to remember the unostentatious, earnest, self-immolation of father and son. But it is chiefly of the son that we would write, the Confederate soldier who died upon the parapet of Fort Sumter, July 20th, 1864. When he was eighteen years old his father was tried for highs treason against the Crown of England, and he asked and obtained permission to stand by his side in the dock, to show what he too felt and thought about Ireland's wrongs and woes. His father owned a beautiful estate, which was confiscated when he was condemned (along with Smith O'Bryan and General Meagher) for their brave words to their countrymen. His househol
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Frank H. Harleston — a hero of Fort Sumter. (search)
Frank H. Harleston — a hero of Fort Sumter. By Miss Claudine Rhett. Those who read history with thoughtful eyes derive as much pleasure from the study of character as from that of events. I think that no where in the power of a noble character more strikingly illustrated than in the case of Lord Howe, the young English officer who was killed in one of the early skirmishes of the war waged for the possession of Canada, some years before the American Revolution. Lord Howe achieved nothing e than his duty. Frank Harleston was not quite 24 years old when he fell, but he had lived long enough to win the thorough confidence of his superiors in rank, the hearts of his comrades and the gatitude of his State. The brave die never; In death they but exchange their Country's arms for more-- Their country's heart. A copy of these lines were found in Captain Harleston's jacket pocket after his death; he probably wrote them down from memory the night he was killed. Claudine Rhett
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
already detailed. Lane's Battery from the General Reserve, with six guns, one of them a twelve pound Whitworth rifle, occupied Taylor's Hill on the extreme left. Between that point and the plank-road were placed the batteries of Huger, Grandy, Lewis and Maurin, the latter being on Marye's Hill; just to the left of the plank-road, Parker's Battery of Alexander's Reserve Battalion was advanced to Stansbury's house. The rest of this battalion was held in reserve in rear of this house, except Rhett's Rifle Battery, which enfiladed the plank-road from a high hill overlooking Marye's from the rear, and Eubanks, which was temporarily with Pickett's Division. Nine guns of the Washington Artillery under Colonel Walton, occupied the pits on Marye's Hill to the right of the plank-road, and a short distance in their rear Mosely's Battery of six guns was kept in reserve. On Lee's Hill, and to the right were posted twenty-one guns, for the most part rifles, under Colonel Cabell and Major Ham
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
from below Falmouth. Moreover, even if the crest south of Marye's had been carried, any further advance would have received an enfilade fire from Lee's hill and a severe direct fire from the high hills between the Plank-road and Hazel run, where Rhett's rifle battery was already in position and fortified, while a successful attack a few hundred yards north of this road could have been pushed with very little fire in the flank against wooded hills which gave no positions for artillery, and requets, of which about two thousand were in the front line. About 12 o'clock M., General Longstreet ordered Colonel Alexander to throw a hundred shells down the streets of the city and towards the bridges, which was scarcely commenced by Moody's, Rhett's and Parker's batteries when the assaulting column issued from the town preceded by a cloud of skirmishers and moving by the flank down the Telegraph and Plank roads crossed the canal. No sooner did their columns appear than the eleven guns o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 9.91 (search)
th Carolina. 18th South Carolina. 22d South Carolina. 23d South Carolina. Holcombe (South Carolina) Legion. Boyce's S. C. Bat., (Macbeth Artillery.) Artillery of the right wing. Washington (La.) Artillery. Colonel J. B. Walton. Eshleman's 4th Company. Miller's 3d Company. Richardson's 2d Company. Squires's 1st Company. Lee's Battalion. Colonel S. D. Lee. Eubank's Virginia Battery. Grimes's Virginia Battery. Jordan's Va. Bat., (Bedford Artillery.) Parker's Virginia Battery. Rhett's South Carolina Battery. Taylor's Virginia Battery. Miscellaneous Batteries. Huger's Virginia Battery. Attached to Anderson's division, but not mentioned in the reports. Leake's Virginia Battery. Mentioned in the reports, but assignments not indicated. Maurin's Louisiana Battery, (Donaldsonville Artillery.) Mentioned in the reports, but assignments not indicated. Moorman's Virginia Battery. Attached to Anderson's division, but not mentioned in the reports. Rogers's Virgin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
ok charge of us again, and we had a most delightful excursion to the historic points of Charleston harbor,--Moultre, Sumter, Morris Island, &c.--the time passing away most charmingly as a number of Confederate veterans pointed out to us everything of interest, and recalled reminiscences of thrilling or ludicrous incidents in the ever memorable defence of Charleston. We spent an hour in Sumter, with the rare advantage of having with us the first commandant of the fort during the siege (Colonel Rhett), its last commandant (Major T. A. Huegenin), and the present United States engineer officer in charge (Captain Post),--all of whom were very polite in explaining everything to us. We came away more impressed than ever with the heroic skill and indomitable pluck with which Sumter and Charleston were held to the last, and more anxious than ever to see in print the history of the siege which our old college friend, Major John Johnson, (now Rev. John Johnson, of Charleston), the engineer of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letters from Fort Sumter. (search)
and sit with us six hours, his battery would be completely silenced, and he would never open again, though he should live to the age of twice three score and ten. One of Ripley's fancy aids-de-camp came down the other night with orders to Colonel Rhett to hold the Fort at all hazards, and was accidentally forced to remain in the Fort during next day; but he left here as soon as possible, the most disagreeably scared man you ever saw in your life, and I venture a prediction that he won't comtold you in my last that we had but one serviceable gun. Since then, however, we have rigged up two others that were disabled, which, though the parapet is knocked away in front of both, we expect to fight in case the Ironclads try us again. Colonel Rhett has fully equalled our expectations, as regards being a cool, collected, brave man, and he has certainly acted well in this affair. The Generals tried to make him shoulder the responsibility of abandoning the Fort, the other day, by endeavor
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Morris Island. (search)
Morris Island. By Miss Claudine Rhett. Five miles from Charleston lies Morris Island, facing the broad Atlantic to the east, and divided from James Island by a wide marsh and a winding channel. It is a bare, desolate tract of barren land, scarcely rising above the level of the water. The wind sweeps over it, whirling the sea-sand into ever-shifting hillocks and hollows, like the deserts of Arabia, but without the attractions ascribed to those wildernesses by the poet Moore; for down these slopes spring no silvery-footed antelopes and nowhere does the Acacia wave her yellow hair. Only a few stunted shrubs grow along the western side of the island near the creek, affording a scant refuge to the little sea-birds which build their nests among the wind-tossed branches. The only inhabitants are an oyster-gatherer and a few men who attend to the light-house. If human vision could reach so far, one might stand on the beach and look across the intervening space to the continent of E
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