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reenforced during the action by several others. All fell back across the causeway to River's merely, and joined the main body of our troops. Enemy ascertained from prisoners to be in strong force at Legare's, under command of Brig.-Gen. Stevens. Heavy bombardment all day by gunboats, of our troops in line of battle, to resist enemy's advance from Legare's; our troops necessarily much exposed. A section of Capt. William C. Preston's battery light artillery, under Capt. Preston and Lieut. Julius Rhett, was carried with great promptness and dash into position, and worked with fierce energy under a heavy cross-fire from the gunboats in the two rivers, and under a direct fire from a piece of the enemy's, at the woods on Legare's, in front. The fire from these guns, and from the stationary and more distant batteries of Col. T. G. Lamar and of Capt.----Warley, in the direction of Secessionville, rendered the enemy's advance across the causeway, though repeatedly threatened, too perilou
east barbette battery was officered, as we understand, by Capt. D. Fleming, Lieut. F. D. Blake, Lieut. Jones, and Lieut. Julius Rhett, (a volunteer absent from Preston's battery light artillery on sick leave.) The north-east barbette battery was ofhe east side of Fort Sumter. This was the shortest distance attained by any of the fleet, no other venturing so near. Col. Rhett now requested Lieut.-Colonel Yates to take charge of a Brooks gun for a few shots, and to sight it carefully himself. rushed immediately to battery. The garrison, palmetto, and regimental flags were now hoisted, and saluted by order of Col. Rhett with thirteen guns-thus announcing to the enemy, that though the Fort might be battered down, the confederate colors wo of her advance, that her officer felt confident of her power, and expected to accomplish great things. Seeing this, Colonel Rhett requested Lieut.-Colonel Yates, an accomplished artillerist, to take charge of one of the Brooke guns, and pay his re
d soon after all their flags were observed to be flying at half-mast. Six hundred and twelve shots and shell had been fired at Fort Sumter of which most struck. The casualties in the fort were one man killed; Lieutenant John Middleton, Lieutenant Julius Rhett, Lieutenant Johnson, engineer, and ten privates slightly wounded. The fort was seriously injured on the north-west face; one nine-inch Dahlgren gun, three forty-two-pounders and one eight-inch columbiad disabled. During the afternoon tving an occasional shot from the enemy. On the twentieth the enemy re-opened his fire heavily, principally against Fort Sumter, doing, as might be expected, more damage than before. It was steadily kept up throughout the day, and at night Colonel Rhett reported it as the heaviest which had taken place. Eight hundred and seventy-nine shots were fired, of which four hundred and eight struck outside, two hundred and ninety-six inside, one hundred and seventy-five passed over. The greater por
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Relative strength at Second Manassas. (search)
fth and Ninth Virginia cavalry, accompanied the army on the Manassas campaign. The total of Stuart's force July 20th was 4,035, of which Colonel Taylor estimates that Fitzhugh Lee had 2,500. This estimate is no doubt nearly correct. The artillery taken consisted of twenty batteries (and possibly a few more). There were the four companies constituting the Washington artillery, viz: Squiers', Richardson's, Miller's and Eshleman's; the five under Colonel S. D. Lee, viz: Eubank's, Parker's, Rhett's, Jordan's and Taylor's; three attached to Hood's division, viz: Reilly's, Bachman's and Garden's, and the following: Dixie artillery, Striblings', Maurin's, Leake's, Rodger's, Brown's, Grimes' and Anderson's batteries. This list, I think, is incomplete, and I hope someone who has the knowledge will make it correct. Colonel Taylor puts the strength of this artillery at 2,500, which seems to me an over-estimate, as artillery companies in the Confederate army were far more frequently under
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations before Charleston in May and July, 1862. (search)
during the action by several others. All fell back across the causeway to Rivers merely, and joined the main body of our troops. Enemy ascertained from prisoners to be in strong force at Legare's, under command of Brigadier-General Stevens. Heavy bombardment all day by gunboats of our troops in line of battle to resist enemy's advance from Legare's — our troops necessarily much exposed. A section of Captain William C. Preston's battery, light artillery, under Captain Preston and Lieutenant Julius Rhett, was carried with great promptness and dash into position, and worked with fierce energy, under a heavy cross-fire from the gunboats in the two rivers, and under a direct fire from a piece of the enemy's at the woods on Legare's, in front. The fire from these guns, and from the stationary and more distant batteries of Colonel T. G. Lamar and of Captain Warley, in the direction of Secessionville, rendered the enemy's advance across the causeway, through repeatedly threatened, too pe