Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Thomas G. Rhett or search for Thomas G. Rhett in all documents.

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the 10th Virginia regiment under Col. Gibbons, Lieut.-Col. Warren, and Major Walker. I cannot speak too highly of the gallantry and good service of my personal staff, Lieutenants Chentney, McDonald, and Contee. They were repeatedly exposed to the enemy's fire in delivering orders, and rendered excellent service in obtaining information of his whereabouts. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Arnold Elzey, Brigadier-General Commanding 4th Brigade. To Major Thomas G. Rhett, Ass't Adj't-Gen. Report of Capt. John D. Imboden, of the Staunton artillery. Manassas Junction, Va., July 22, 1861. Brigadier-General W. H. Whiting, Commanding the Third Brigade of the Army of the Shenandoah: I submit the following summary report of the part taken in the engagement of yesterday, by the battery of the brigade — the Staunton Artillery--under my command. The battery arrived at Camp Walker, below the Junction, at half-past 11 o'clock the night before the ba
tion in relation to the recapture of fugitive slaves, is, by the Constitution, vested exclusively in Congress. In 1850 Congress enacted a Fugitive Slave Act, prepared by Southern Senators and Representatives, so stringent in its provisions that Mr. Rhett, of South Carolina, one of the arch instigators of treason there, expressed doubts of its constitutionality; and that Act is still in force. So far, then, as there is constitutional requirement to provide by legislation for such recapture, it er since I entered political life. I am content with what has been done to-day, and content with what will take place to-morrow. We have carried the body of this Union to its last resting place, and now we will drop the flag over its grave. Mr. Rhett. The secession of South Carolina is not an event of a day. It is not any thing produced by Mr. Lincoln's election, or by the non-execution of the fugitive slave law. It has been a matter which has been gathering head for thirty years; and in th
the smoke, which receded to the northwest. The Confederate cavalry, too, were seen galloping in that direction, perhaps to cut up the flying columns of the Yankees. More than an hour passed on, and nothing of the strife is heard but the roar of ordnance and the rattle of musketry. Suddenly an order comes, borne, I believe, by Gen. McGowan, for the 2d and 8th Palmetto regiments to hasten to the assistance of the left wing. Couriers are despatched to Capt. Perryman, out scouting, and Capt. Rhett, on picket guard, to march across the fields to the left, and join their regiment, the 2d, which is on the march to aid the left wing. This regiment, to which was attached Kemper's battery, followed by the 8th, Col. Cash, hurried to the scene of action. It was met along the way by numbers of the wounded, dying, and retiring, who declared that the day had gone against us; that Sloan's regiment, the 4th, was cut to pieces; that Hampton's Legion, coming to the rescue, and the Louisiana bat
a treaty? It cannot be done; it is impracticable. But, Mr. President, I concur fully with the distinguished Senator from Kentucky in the dislike expressed by him to a change in the form of our Government. He seemed to be apprehensive of a dictatorship. He feared there might be a change in the nature and character of our institutions. I could, if I chose, refer to many proofs to establish the fact that there has been a design to change the nature of our Government. I could refer to Mr. Rhett; I could refer to Mr. Inglis; I could refer to various others to prove this. The Montgomery Daily Advertiser, one of the organs of the so-called Southern Confederacy, says: Has it been a precipitate revolution? It has not. With coolness and deliberation the subject has been thought of for forty years; for ten years it has been the all-absorbing theme in political circles. From Maine to Mexico all the different phases and forms of the question have been presented to the people, un