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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 18 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 2 0 Browse Search
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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.16 (search)
Chapter XII a Roving Commission so the fair Greek disappears; and Stanley, free and heart-whole, is whirled away again by the Herald's swift and changing summons: to Athens, to witness a Royal Baptism, and describe the temples and ruins, with which he was enraptured; to Smyrna, Rhodes, Beyrout, and Alexandria; thence to Spain, where great events seemed impending. But he has barely inter-viewed General Prim, when he is ordered to London; there the Herald's agent, Colonel Finlay Anderson, gives him a surprising commission. It is vaguely reported that Dr. Livingstone is on his way home-ward from Africa. On the chance of meeting him, and getting the first intelligence, Stanley is to go to Aden, and use his discretion as to going to Zanzibar. It looks like a wild-goose chase, but his, not to make reply; his, not to reason why ; and he is off to Aden, which he reaches November 21, 1868. Not a word can he learn of Livingstone. He writes enquiries to Consul Webb at Zanzibar, and
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.22 (search)
others helped to fill in the blank in the atlas of 1849, which has become the network of names in the atlas of 1904. A famous company of strong men gave the best of their energies to the opening of Africa during the nineteenth century. They were missionaries, like Moffat and Livingstone; scientific inquirers, like Barth, Rohlfs, Du Chaillu, Teleki, and Thomson; adventurous explorers, like Speke, Grant, Burton, Cameron, and Selous; and soldiers, statesmen, and organisers, such as Gordon, Rhodes, Samuel Baker, Emin Pasha, Johnston, Lugard, and Taubman Goldie — but there is no need to go through the list. Their discoveries were made often with a more slender equipment and scantier resources; as administrators, one or two at least could be counted his equals. But those of the distinguished band, who still survive, would freely acknowledge that it was Stanley who put the crown and coping-stone on the edifice of African exploration, and so completed the task, begun twenty-four centuri
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.25 (search)
d land him in the street pretty quickly. Well, just what the Englishman in Lambeth would do, Cecil Rhodes did in South Africa with Lobengula. He paid his rent regularly, one thousand two hundred pouch, and other gifts, for the right to manage Mashonaland as he saw fit. Now in the concession to Rhodes, Lobengula had reserved no rights to meddle in the territory. Therefore, when, under the plea that his cattle had been stolen by Rhodes's servants, or subjects, the Mashonas, Lobengula marched into Rhodes's territory and slaughtered the Mashonas and took the white man's cattle, besides creatingRhodes's territory and slaughtered the Mashonas and took the white man's cattle, besides creating a general scare among the outlying farmers, and the isolated miners,--Jameson, who was acting as Rhodes's steward, sent the subagent Lendy upon the tracks of the high-handed Matabele, hence the war. Rhodes's steward, sent the subagent Lendy upon the tracks of the high-handed Matabele, hence the war. This little exposition took amazingly, and there was not one dissentient voice. About the Coal-war I was equally frank, and said, in conclusion, that, if I had any money to spare at the present
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.27 (search)
and would applaud Lord Salisbury if he sent a fleet up the Dardanelles. To-day, we have news that Dr. Jameson has invaded the Transvaal, with a small force between four hundred and six hundred strong! The details are meagre, but the impression is that he is alone in this wild escapade. A Sun interviewer has asked me my opinion in the matter, and I have said frankly that it is our duty to drive him back quicker than he went in. It is not so very long ago that I entertained both Jameson and Rhodes here. I never suspected that either of them would have been concerned in such a harum-scarum act as this! July 7th, Tuesday. Dined with Mr. and Mrs. Yates Thompson. The Jameson Raid was very much discussed; and I found myself, in this instance, quite in accord with the Radicals whom I met there. July 9th. Dined with Lord James of Hereford. I was surprised at his saying that there were extenuating circumstances for Jameson's act, but it is evident that his legal acumen is awry. Un
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
cy of, 518-520. Price, Dick, 10. Price, Richard and Jenny, 8-10. Price, Sarah, 8-10. Provincialism, 155. Rawlinson, Sir, Henry, 286, 289. Reading, Mr. Stanley the elder instructs Stanley in, 127. Recreation, real, thoughts on, 525, 526. Redmond, John, 474. Religion, thoughts on, 517-519. Religious convictions, of Stanley when a boy, 23-28; of the elder Mr. Stanley, 133-137. Religious education, thoughts on, 521. Reviews and reviewers, thoughts on, 526, 527. Rhodes, Cecil, 455. Rhuddlan Eisteddfod, 14, 16. Richardson, Mr., 89-121. Roberts, Lord, 464. Roberts, Willie, 22, 23. Robertson, Mr., 472, 473. Robinson, Rev. Joseph A., refuses to allow Stanley to be buried in Westminster Abbey, 515. Rowlands, John, Stanley's real name. See Stanley, Henry Morton. Rowlands, John, Stanley's grandfather, 38-40. Runciman, Mr., 523 n. Ruwenzori Mountains. See Moon, Mountains of the. St. Asaph Union Workhouse, 10-34. St. Louis, 115, 116. Sal
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 24: on the natural disapproval of wealth (search)
said the licensed veteran, what can a minister do with so much money? You can't know how to manage it! Gannett, you ought to have a guardeen! No doubt we are all ready, if we personally escape wealth, to offer advice as to its guardianship, but probably the nearer we came to it, the greater the difficulty of deciding how to handle it. There is nothing new in the phenomenon, except in its lately rapid increase among ourselves. Even now it is said that no American is quite so rich as Cecil Rhodes, the South African adventurer, who is wealthy enough to organize piratical expeditions into free states; and, it is predicted, to be elevated to the peerage of England, even after they have failed. No American family is so rich as the Rothschilds, whose nest is still shown-or was till lately — a tottering and shabby house in the Jewish quarter of Frankfort. Matthew Arnold, who shook his head over the comparatively moderate displays of wealth in this country, gloats with delight, in two
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
of human lives that have blossomed, and withered, and perished here, repeating and repeating and repeating, century after century, and age after age, the barren and meaningless process; it is this sense that gives to this forlorn, uncomely land power to speak to the spirit and make friends with it; to speak to it with a voice bitter with satire, but eloquent with melancholy. There are satirical and witty disquisitions on imperialistic morality apropos of Madagascar, the Jameson Raid, Cecil Rhodes, and the British dealings with the Boers. The barbarity of the civilized in contact with the so-called backward peoples excites his indignation, but history and travel show him its universality and quiet his sensibilities to a state of tolerant contempt for all unregenerate mankind: Christian governments are as frank to-day, as open and above-board, in discussing projects for raiding each other's clothes-lines as ever they were before the Golden Rule came smiling into this inhospitable w
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
153 Report upon the Colorado River of the West, 156 Repplier, Agnes, 129 Republic of Republics, 351 Rescue of Greely, the, 169 Resources of the United States, 432 Resurgam, 37 Retrospection and introspection, 525 Return of Peter Grimm, the, 282 Reusz, P. J., 582 Revenue reform, 440 Reveries of a bachelor, 10, II, 12 Review, 333 Review of the debates in the Virginia legislature, 338 Review of the revenue system, 430 Rexford, E. E., 514 Rhett, 327 Rhodes, Cecil, 13 Rhodes, James Ford, 193 n., 345 Ricardo, 43 Rice, Alice Hegan, 288 Rice, Allen T., 302 Richard, 589 Richard Carvel, 91, 287 Richard Henry Dana, a biography, 198 Richard savage, 280 Richardson, Abby S., 280 Richardson, Samuel, 105, 538 Richter, Fernande, 581 Ride of Billy Venero, the, 514 Ride of Paul Venarez, 514 Rider of Dreams, the, 267 Riders of the stars, 161 Ride with Kit Carson through the Great American Desert and the Rocky Mountains, A, 15