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The Daily Dispatch: June 3, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
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ashing into the Yankee regiment their colors and bore them off. He then rode up to Giles's regiment and presented the to them. The act was rewarded by three hearty cheers from our men. The gallant Captain was shot in the head later in the day, and refused to leave the field before the fighting was ever. The Alabama, 6th Georgia, and 23d Georgia suffered severely, the 6th Alabama nearly decimated. The 6th Georgia out of the 500 men they took into the The 4th Battalion of General Rhodes's Di was early in the fight of Saturday, and ed during the day. About twenty- were killed and sixty odd wounded.--Sergeant John W. Ryland, of Captain Bagby's company received a flesh wound in the thigh is at his uncle's, near the city, and is doing well. Of the same company, Samuel C. mes, James E. Bacon, James C. Courtty, Col. Pines, and James Butler, were ed John S. Chilton was wounded, and since died. Ro. V. Hart, Thomas Wyr- Thomas C. Kelly, John W. Walton, Be- Cariton, Benjamin
t, led by Kemper's brigade, as the advance, arrived and entered most gallantly into the fight very much to the assistance of the brave men who had driven the enemy and held them so long in check during their effort to recover lost ground. Gen. Rhodes's brigade, of Hill's division, was in the thickest of the fight. It went into the engagement with about 2,500 men, and of these 1,092 were killed and wounded in the desperate fight. Gen. R.'s men fought like heroes. The officers suffered muground. Gen. Rhodes's brigade, of Hill's division, was in the thickest of the fight. It went into the engagement with about 2,500 men, and of these 1,092 were killed and wounded in the desperate fight. Gen. R.'s men fought like heroes. The officers suffered much. Gen Rhodes received a painful, though not serious, flesh wound in the arm. Philip T. Sutton, of this city, one of his aids, lost his left arm in the afternoon by a Minnie ball, after acquitting himself gallantly on the field.