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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Henry Rhodes or search for Henry Rhodes in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
he most of Mosby's men succeeded in getting away, but some had their horses shot, and others were cut off. Among these were, Anderson, Love, Overby, Carter and Henry Rhodes, of the Twenty-third Virginia Regiment. Custer determined to wreak summary vengeance upon these men. Rhodes was lashed with ropes between two horses, and dragRhodes was lashed with ropes between two horses, and dragged in plain sight of his agonized relatives to the open field of our town, where one man volunteered to do the killing, and ordered the helpless, dazed prisoner to stand up in front of him, while he emptied his pistol upon him. Anderson and Love were shot in a lot behind the court house. Overby and Carter were carried to a larget, his saddle bow bound in silver or gold. In his hand he had a large branch of damsons, which he picked and ate as he rode along. He was a distinguished looking man, with his yellow locks resting upon his shoulders. Rhodes was my friend and playmate, and I saw him shot from a distance, but did not at the time know who it was.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.60 (search)
ection. June 21st and 22d.—The 14th Virginia Cavalry Regiment readvanced towards Chambersburg, Pa., but Co. D, in charge of Captain Moorman and Major Bryan, of Rhodes' Division, was detailed to proceed to the South Mountain to capture horses, of which about 2,000 had been taken there by farmers and industrial establishments to n until ordered otherwise, and to destroy the railroad track as far as possible. I could learn nothing definite concerning the army and General Lee's plans. General Rhodes, I was told, occupied Carlisle, and General Early, York—with the latter was White's Cavalry—while General Imboden's Brigade protected our line of communicatio General Jenkins' Brigade, near Harrisburg, Pa., June 30, 1863. Messrs. Editors—Our last communication was dated Carlisle, Pa., June 27th. That day General Rhodes' command came up, and General Jenkins' Brigade passed three miles beyond and encamped for the night. The next morning we entered and occupied Mechanicsbur