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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
jamin Loyd, David Warren, William Wright, John Sullivan, Robert T. Clifford, Thomas Harding, Perry Wilkes, John Hyland, Michael McCormick, Timothy O'Donohue, George Butts, Charles Asten, John Ortega. Maurice Wagg, R. H. King,----Wilkes,----Demming, Bernard Harley, William Smith, Richard Hamilton, Edward J. Houghton, Oliver O'Brien, Frank Lucas, William Garvin, Charles J. Bibber, John Neil, Robert Montgomery, James Roberts, Charles Hawking, Dennis Conlan, James Sullivan, William Hinnegan, Charles Rice, John Cooper, Patrick Mullin, James Saunders, James Horton, James Rountry, John H. Ferrell, John Ditzenbach, Thomas Taylor, Patrick Mullin, Aaron Anderson or Sanderson (colored), Charles H. Smith, Hugh Logan, Lewis A. Horton, George Moore, Luke M. Griswold, John Jones, George Pyne, Thomas Smith, Charles Reed, John S. Lann, George Schutt, John Mack, John H. Nibbe, Othniel Tripp, John Griffiths, Edward Swatton, John Swatson, Phillip Bazaar, George Province, Augustus Williams, Auzella Savage
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
icers and men who volunteered to go with Commander Rhind--himself a volunteer — were Lieutenant Samuel W. Preston of the Admiral's staff, Second-Assistant Engineer A. T. E. Mullan, Master's Mate Paul Boyden; Frank Lucas, Coxswain; William Gainn, Captain-of-the-Forecastle; Charles T. Bibber, Gunner's Mate; John Neil, Quarter-Gunner; Robert Montgomery, Captain-of-the-Afterguard; James Roberts and Dennis Conlan, Seamen; James Sullivan, Ordinary Seaman; William Horrigan, Second-class Fireman; Charles Rice, Coal-heaver. The men were all volunteers from Commander Rhind's vessel, the Agawam. General Butler had been again notified that the powder-boat would be exploded on the night of the 23d December, as near the beach at Fort Fisher as it was possible to get her, but the exact distance could not be estimated in the darkness. Although the Louisiana had low steam up, she was towed to within a short distance of her station by the steamer Wilderness, which vessel then remained in the vicini
th Missouri, Colonel Van Duzen, One Hundred and Eleventh Illinois, Colonel Martin, One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Illinois, Colonel Curtis, Fifty-seventh Ohio, Colonel Rice, and One Hundred and Sixteenth Illinois, Colonel Froman. At six the line of skirmishers was advanced to the foot of the hill, driving the rebels. At the or of the Fifty-seventh Ohio. Colonel Froman had been wounded in crossing the creek. The rebel column, a portion of Hardee's corps, came boldly and steadily on. Colonel Rice reserved his fire until the rebels were within sixty yards, when he delivered a terrible fire straight in their faces. At the same time the One Hundred and Elims that they finally repulsed the Yankee charge. It would be unjust to omit to make record of the universal testimony of officers and men to the conduct of Colonel Rice. With the utmost intrepidity and coolness he remained assisting the assault and handling his men as steadily and with the precision of a dress parade. Duri
n getting into position. General Fuller's, Colonel Rice's, and Colonel Sprague's brigades, were fieefore the withering fire of that portion of Colonel Rice's brigade. In half an hour from the first nty-ninth Colonel Mersey's brigade relieved Colonel Rice's, and still the skirmishing continued. Cot word that his ammunition was nearly gone, Colonel Rice ordered out the Sixty-sixth to relieve the cause irreparable, I find the following: Colonel Rice, Fifty-seventh Ohio, mortally wounded; Colollinois, of McCook's brigade, and the rebel Colonel Rice, of the Twenty-eighth Tennessee, to bury thdead killed in the assault made on Monday. Colonel Rice was very anxious that the arms and accoutrehe other should occupy the ground. To this Colonel Rice reluctantly consented — knowing that if he rning. Great praise is due to the rebel Colonels Rice and House, for the gentlemanly and humane g them those of Generals Harker and McCook; Colonel Rice and others badly wounded; our aggregate los
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 60. battle of Elkin's ford, Arkansas. (search)
The enemy (since ascertained to be General Cabell's brigade, sixteen hundred strong), charged with a yell upon our left, for the purpose of flanking us and capturing our battery. Their approach from the cover of the timber was met gallantly by two or three well-directed volleys from the Thirty-sixth Iowa. Immediately after the charge and repulse of the enemy, the reinforcements sent for by me arrived, consisting of the Twenty-ninth Iowa infantry and Ninth Wisconsin infantry, of Brigadier-General Rice's brigade. But before they were put in position by him the enemy withdrew; not, however, until a grape-shot from the battery had inflicted a slight wound upon the General's head, from the effect of which, I am gratified to say, he has recovered. In looking upon the results of this engagement and the great disparity of numbers of the forces engaged, I cannot but regard this encounter as one reflecting the highest praise upon the coolness and unflinching courage of the men of my co
fety. Major McCauleigh was wounded, and is still a prisoner. Accompanying the train were several negro recruiting officers, with about three hundred negro recruits. About one hundred and fifty of them, probably, were killed — the balance escaped. On our side there were between two hundred and fifty and two hundred and sixty killed and wounded. According to the rebel official report, as I am informed by one of our wounded officers, who read it in manuscript, they had one hundred and ten killed, two hundred and seventy-eight wounded, and forty missing. All our wounded were paroled. While they remained in the hands of the rebels they were well treated and provided for. The rebels lost two Colonels in the action--one of them, Colonel Pettus, of this State. Most of our wounded have arrived here, and are well cared for in the hospital. Colonel Drake, as soon as he can bear the trip, will start North. Among the killed is Captain Townsend, of General Rice's staff
n flames. The following officers and men manned the powder-boat: Commander A. C. Rhind; Lieutenant S. W. Preston; Second Assistant Engineer A. T. E. Mullan; Master's Mate Paul Boyden; Frank Lucas, coxswain; William Garvin, captain forecastle; Charles J. Bibber, gunner's mate; John Neil, quarter gunner; Robert Montgomery; captain after-guard; James Roberts, seaman, Charles Hawkins, seaman; Dennis Conlon, seaman; James Sullivan, ordinary seaman; William Hinnegan, second-class fireman; Charles Rice, coal-heaver. The crew were all volunteers from my own vessel, the Agawam. The zeal, patience, and endurance of officers and men were unsurpassed, and I believe no officer could have been better supported. To Lieutenant Lamson, Mr Bradford, and the officers and men of the Wilderness, we are indebted for the means of escape; and from the first start from Norfolk, we have received every desired assistance. The vessel was towed to Wilmington bar by the Sassacus, Lieutenant Commander
Y. James H. Smith, Philadelphia, N. Y. James B. Schaffner, 213 Mohawk St., Herkimer, N. Y. Thomas Topper, Avonlea, Saskatchewan, Canada. Company D Fred Bryce, Ilion, N. Y. H. W. Cadwell, Jordanville, N. Y. William Dubois, Atwood, N. Y. M. D. Elwood, 1109 City St., Utica, N. Y. A. A. Gilespie, Duke Center, Penn. George H. Gilbert, Reed City, Mich. Levi Helmer, Dodgeville, N. Y. J. W. Hartley, Waterville, N. Y. J. H. Leonardson, R. F. D. No 7, Canastota, N Y. Charles Rice, 36 Winter St., West End Station, Me. Burrell Rice, Salisbury Center, N. Y. C. Thurston, Belfast, Me. Milo B. Tanner, 1046 Emerson St., Sheldon, Wyo. Company E James T. Clark, 37 Robinson St., Schenectady, N. Y. C. A. Farr, Osborn, Mo. E. M. Irons, Hartwick, N. Y. E C. Irons, Crandall's Hotel, Binghamton, N. Y. George M. Lemon, 1202 6th Ave., Watervleit, N. Y. Joseph Lockwood, R. F. D. No. 1, Alleghany, N. Y. W. G. Palmer, Lisle, N. Y. J. H. Smythe, VanHornsvil
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Non-commissioned officers and privates (search)
Y. James H. Smith, Philadelphia, N. Y. James B. Schaffner, 213 Mohawk St., Herkimer, N. Y. Thomas Topper, Avonlea, Saskatchewan, Canada. Company D Fred Bryce, Ilion, N. Y. H. W. Cadwell, Jordanville, N. Y. William Dubois, Atwood, N. Y. M. D. Elwood, 1109 City St., Utica, N. Y. A. A. Gilespie, Duke Center, Penn. George H. Gilbert, Reed City, Mich. Levi Helmer, Dodgeville, N. Y. J. W. Hartley, Waterville, N. Y. J. H. Leonardson, R. F. D. No 7, Canastota, N Y. Charles Rice, 36 Winter St., West End Station, Me. Burrell Rice, Salisbury Center, N. Y. C. Thurston, Belfast, Me. Milo B. Tanner, 1046 Emerson St., Sheldon, Wyo. Company E James T. Clark, 37 Robinson St., Schenectady, N. Y. C. A. Farr, Osborn, Mo. E. M. Irons, Hartwick, N. Y. E C. Irons, Crandall's Hotel, Binghamton, N. Y. George M. Lemon, 1202 6th Ave., Watervleit, N. Y. Joseph Lockwood, R. F. D. No. 1, Alleghany, N. Y. W. G. Palmer, Lisle, N. Y. J. H. Smythe, VanHornsvil
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers, and soldiers who died as prisoners. (search)
s, Edward,*24th Mass. Inf.,Millen, Ga.,--- Rhodes, Leroy B.,1st Mass. H. A.,Macon, Ga.,April 30, 1865. Rhodes, William W.,1st Mass. S. S.,Annapolis, Md.,Nov. 14, 1862. Rice, C. A. G., Corp.,2d Mass. H. A.,Andersonville, Ga.,July 13, 1864. Rice, Charles,25th Mass. Inf.,Charleston, S. C.,Oct. 10, 1864. Rice, Charles,2d Mass. Cav.,Andersonville, Ga.,May 22, 1864. Rice, Christian, Possibly identical with Reiss, Christian, reported deserted, Nov. 24, 1864.20th Mass. Inf.,Richmond, Va.,MarchRice, Charles,2d Mass. Cav.,Andersonville, Ga.,May 22, 1864. Rice, Christian, Possibly identical with Reiss, Christian, reported deserted, Nov. 24, 1864.20th Mass. Inf.,Richmond, Va.,March 8, 1865. Rice, Thomas,*2d Mass. Cav.,Andersonville, Ga.,May 3, 1864. Rich, Samuel,27th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,July 29, 1864. Richards, G.,*16th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 6, 1864. Richards, Joseph,27th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,July 11, 1864. Richards, Thomas,20th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Sept. 1, 1864. Richards, Warren W.,11th Mass. Inf.,Bull Run, Va.,Sept. 16, 1862. Richardson, George E.,38th Mass. Inf.,Salisbury, N. C.,Nov. 3, 1864. Richardson, I. Milton,40th
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