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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 66 24 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 56 0 Browse Search
John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment 38 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 9 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
John Saunders; 34th N. Y., Col. James A. Suiter; 82d N. Y., Col. Henry W. Hudson; 2d Co. Minn. Sharp-shooters, Capt. William F. Russell. Brigade loss: k, 12; w, 82; in, 152==246. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William W. Burns (w): 69th Pa., Col. Joshua T. Owen; 71st Pa., Lieut.-Col. William G. Jones; 72d Pa., Col. De Witt C. Baxter; 106th Pa., Col. Turner G. Morehead. Brigade loss: k, 40; w, 193; m, 172==405. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. N. J. T. Dana: 19th Mass., Col. Edward W. Hinks (w), Capt. Edmund Rice, Lieut.-Col. Arthur F. Devereux; 20th Mass., Col. William R. Lee; 7th Mich., Col. Ira R. Grosvenor; 42d N. Y., Col. Edmund C. Charles (w and c), Lieut.-Col. James J. Mooney. Brigade loss: k, 51; w, 262; m, 153==466. Artillery, Col. Charles H. Tompkins: A, 1st R. I., Capt. John A. Tompkins; I, 1st U. S., Lieut. Edmund Kirby. Artillery loss: w, 12; m, 4==16. reserve artillery: G, 1st N. Y., Capt. John B. Frank; B, 1st R. I., Capt. Walter O. Bartlett; G, 1st R. I., Capt. Charles D. O
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Repelling Lee's last blow at Gettysburg. (search)
Repelling Lee's last blow at Gettysburg. I. By Edmund Rice, Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel, U. S. A. The brigades of Harrow, Webb, and Hall, of Gibbon's division, Hancock's corps, occupied the crest on Cemetery Ridge on July 3d. The right of Hall's and the left of Webb's brigades were in a clump of trees, called by the enemy the salient of our position, and this grove was the focus of the most fearful cannonade that preceded Pickett's charge. One regiment, the 72d Pennsylvania, in Webb's command, was a little in rear of the left of its brigade; two regiments, the 19th Massachusetts and 42d New York, Colonel A. F. Devereux commanding, of Hall's brigade, were in rear of the right of their brigade. From the opposite ridge, three-fourths of a mile away, a line of skirmishers sprang lightly forward out of the woods, and with intervals well kept moved rapidly down into the open fields, closely followed by a line of battle, then by another, and by yet a third. Both sides watched thi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at the beginning of Grant's campaign against Richmond. (search)
lliam P. Baily; 64th N. Y., Maj. Leman W. Bradley; 66th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. John S. Hammell; 53d Pa., Lieut.-Col. Richards McMichael; 145th Pa., Col. Hiram l. Brown; 148th Pa., Col. James A. Beaver. Second division, Brig.-Gen. John Gibbon. Provost Guard: 2d Co. Minn. Sharp-shooters, Capt. Mahlon Black. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Alex. S. Webb: 19th Me., Col. Selden Connor; 1st Co. Andrew (Mass.) Sharp-shooters, Lieut. Samuel G. Gilbreth; 15th Mass., Maj. I. Harris Hooper; 19th Mass., Maj. Edmund Rice; 20th Mass., Maj. Henry L. Abbott; 7th Mich., Maj. Sylvanus W. Curtis; 42d N. Y., Maj. Patrick J. Downing; 59th N. Y., Capt. William McFadden; 82d N. Y. (2d Militia), Col. Henry W. Hudson. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Joshua T. Owen: 152d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. George W. Thompson; 69th Pa., Maj. William Davis; 71st Pa., Lieut.-Col. Charles Kochersperger; 72d Pa., Col. De Witt C. Baxter; 106th Pa., Capt. Robert H. Ford. Third Brigade, Col. Samuel S. Carroll: 14th Conn., Col. Theodore G. Ellis;
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Petersburg and Richmond: December 31st, 1864. (search)
y Art'y, Maj. Frank Williams; 64th N. Y. (6 co's), Capt. Victor D. Renwick; 66th N. Y., Capt. Nathaniel P. Lane; 53d Pa., Lieut.-Col. George C. Anderson; 116th Pa., Capt. David W. Megraw; 145th Pa., Capt. Peter W. Free; 148th Pa., Capt. James F. Weaver. Second division, Maj.-Gen. John Gibbon (on leave), Brig.-Gen. Thomas A. Smyth. Provost Guard: 2d Co. Minn. Sharp-shooters, Capt. Mahlon Black. First Brigade, Col. James M. Willett: 19th Me., Col. Isaac W. Starbird; 19th Mass., Lieut.-Col. Edmund Rice; 20th Mass., Maj. John Kelliher; 7th Mich., Lieut.-Col. George W. La Point; 1st Minn. (2 co's), Capt. James C. Farwell; 59th N. Y., Col. William A. Olmsted; 152d N. Y., Capt. Charles H. Dygert; 184th Pa., Maj. George L. Ritman; 36th Wis., Lieut.-Col. Clement E. Warner. Second Brigade, Col. Mathew Murphy: 8th N. Y. Heavy Art'y, Maj. Joel B. Baker; 155th N. Y., Capt. Michael Doheny; 164th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. William DeLacy; 170th N. Y., Col. James P. McIvor; 182d N. Y. (69th N. Y. N. G
ought in the Wilderness campaign. Lieutenant-Colonel Waldo Merriam, who commanded the regiment, was killed at Spotsylvania. The Sixteenth was discharged July 11, 1864, and the recruits and reenlisted men remaining in the field were transferred to the Eleventh Massachusetts. Nineteenth Massachusetts Infantry. Hall's Brigade — Gibbon's Division--Second Corps. (1) Col. Edward W. Hinks; Bvt. Maj.-Gen. (2) Col. Arthur F. Devereux; Bvt. Brig. Gen. (3) Col. Ansel D. Wass. (4) Col. Edmund Rice. companies. killed and died of wounds. died of disease, accidents, in Prison, &c. Total Enrollment. Officers. Men. Total. Officers. Men. Total. Field and Staff 2 1 3   2 2 20 Company A 2 15 17   15 15 185   B   20 20   12 12 188   C 1 13 14   17 17 177   D   9 9   13 13 133   E 1 21 22   14 14 179   F 2 12 14   10 10 181   G 3 16 19   13 13 192   H 1 20 21   18 18 268   I   8 8   10 10 147   K 2 12 14   9 9 165 Total
John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment, Chapter 5: battles at Peach Orchard, Glendale and Malvern Hill. (search)
the edge of the woods. Under a terrible fire we changed front. Our brave Major How fell, never to rise again; Colonel Hincks was supposed to be mortally wounded and was carried from the field; Lieut. David Lee was killed, and the ground was strewn with our dead and wounded comrades. For a moment the regiment was in confusion, but Captain Weymouth, assisted by Sergeant-Major Newcomb and others, rallied the men on the colors and the line was at once reformed and our position held. Capt. Edmund Rice was in command of the regiment. He was noted for his coolness and bravery, and the men had confidence in him. As I looked down the line of Company A many places were vacant. Ed. Hale, Volney P. Chase, Charles Boynton and several others were killed, while the list of wounded could not be ascertained at that time. Company A had lost men by death, but this was the first time any of our number had been killed in action. Charles Boynton was one of my townsmen. He was an eccentric man
John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment, Chapter 8: battles of Chancellorsville, Thoroughfare Gap and Gettysburg.--wounded at Gettysburg and ordered home. (search)
two months pay. June 16, marching orders came; we waited until all had moved, then with two pieces of the 1st Rhode Island artillery took our place in the rear. Two companies were ordered to march half a mile in the rear of the column, and Major Rice was placed in command of this detachment. We marched over ground which we had travelled before. The roads were very dusty and the sun scorching. At times the woods on each side were on fire, and our men suffered badly. June 20 we arrived aton there were seven of us lying side by side. They told the story of the battle. Lieutenants Robinson and Donath had been killed, also many of our bravest and best men. My company the day before had numbered fifteen, officers and men. Only Lieutenant Rice and five men remained. They also told me how well our boys had fought; that at last we had met the rebels in an open field and had won a substantial victory. They described to me Pickett's charge. How they had come across the field in thr
John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment, Chapter 9: regiment ordered home.--receptions.--my first call upon Governor Andrew.--return to the front. (search)
s camped near Stevensburg, Va. I waited until after January 1 for my discharge, but it did not come, and my wound was so bad that the surgeon ordered me home. Colonel Rice was in command of the regiment, Colonel Devereaux being in command of the Philadelphia brigade. I called on Colonel Devereaux, who was very indignant to learnperience had demonstrated would make vacant places in their thinned ranks. Colonel Devereaux did not return with us, and the regiment was in command of Lieutenant-Colonel Rice. We had a nice passage to New York, spent St. Patrick's day and Eph. Hall's birthday in Philadelphia, and in due time arrived in Washington. I was detaiof the guard. A little incident occurred here which I think is not known to the officers, but it shows the honor of the men of the 19th. After I was detailed Colonel Rice sent for me and said, We leave here at six o'clock to-morrow morning. The officers will stay up in the city. I want you to keep every man here to be ready to
John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment, Chapter 10: battles of the Wilderness, Todd's Tavern and Laurel Hill.--Engagement at the Bloody Angle. (search)
rew a little lighter, the moon having broken through the clouds, Colonel Rice went to the right and found we were not connected with any otherr undertook to drive us back, but we knew our business, and when Colonel Rice found our brigade commander, he was informed that an aid had beeken. When we reached a clearing the only officers in sight were Colonel Rice, Lieutenant Thompson and myself. Where are the colors? said CoColonel Rice. We could not answer the question. At that moment we saw several hundred rebels running back to their lines. Colonel Rice said, Colonel Rice said, I see a Massachusetts color and will go after it. You and Lieutenant Thompson try to capture those rebels. Hastily gathering men from nearlyearts we laid him to rest near where he fell. We could not find Colonel Rice and feared he must be dead on the field, but after searching anen the rebels made the dash on our right flank. This was true. Colonel Rice was captured, but escaped, and rejoined the regiment in August.
John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment, Chapter 17: the exchange and return north. (search)
oil came in sight, and at the head of the dear old regiment rode Colonel Rice. He saw me and turned out of the line to shake hands. Next cam came from every company; for a few moments I held a reception. Colonel Rice urged me to come to the regiment, saying he had found a place fo was in command of the regiment a few days during the absence of Colonel Rice and Captain Hume, and was two weeks on courts-martial detail. Je were invited to take part in the parade in Boston July 4, and Colonel Rice was quite anxious that we should. After we went to our quarters for dinner Colonel Rice was called to Boston. Nearly all the officers had business there, and when we boarded the train found the men taken y would come but went to the station at the hour named. I found Colonel Rice and one private. We waited a while, but no more reported, and aft Massachusetts with the regiment in 1861 only one returned,--Col. Edmund Rice, who went out as captain and came home colonel commanding the
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