hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 10, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 10 results in 3 document sections:

J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 22 (search)
concludes, however, by saying it is the duty of subordinate generals in the field to submit in all humility to the behests of their superiors comfortably quartered in Richmond. But if justice were done, and the opinions of the generals in the field were regarded in the matter of discharges, etc., the lawyers, who have grown fat on fees by thinning our ranks, would be compelled to resort to some more laudable means of making a living. A letter from Gov. Shorter, of Alabama, introduces Judge Rice, agent for P. S. Gerald and J. R. Powell, who propose to bring goods into the Confederate States through Mexico, to be paid for in cotton, etc. This was referred by the Secretary to the Quartermaster-General--who protests against it on the ground that it might interfere with his agents already engaged in the business. The President publishes a retaliatory proclamation to-day against Gen. Butler, for hanging Mr. Munford, of New Orleans, who took down the United States flag before the ci
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 32 (search)
y wanderings in search of a home. It consisted of Benjamin Potter, aged seventy-five; John S. Cave, aged fifty; William Hunter, aged forty-seven; David Hunter, aged thirty-five; William C. Tate, aged thirty; Andrew Owsley, aged seventeen; and Martin Rice and his son. While thus engaged in loading their wagons with such effects as they supposed would be most useful to them, a detachment of Kansas troops (said to be part of the Kansas 9th, though this may be a mistake), under command of Lieut.-Col. Clark and Capt. Coleman, came up and took them all prisoners. After a little parleying, Mr. Rice and his son were released and ordered to leave; which they did, of course. They had not gone much over three-fourths of a mile before they heard firing at the point at which they had left the soldiers with the remaining prisoners. In a short time the command moved on, and the wives and other relatives of the prisoners rushed up to ascertain their fate. It was a horrid spectacle. There
The Daily Dispatch: October 10, 1863., [Electronic resource], The Sufferings of the border Missourians. (search)
our's time would have commenced their weary wanderings in search of a home. It consisted of Benjamin Potter, aged 75; John S. Cave, aged 50; William Hunter, aged 47; David Hunter, aged 35; William C. Tate, aged 30; Andrew Owsley, aged 17, and Martin Rice and his son. While thus engaged in loading their wagons with such effects as they supposed would be most useful to them, a detachment of Kansas troops, (said to be part of the Kansas 9th, though this may be a mistake,) under command of Lieut.-Colonel Clark and Capt. Coleman, came up and took them all prisoners. After a little parleying, Mr. Rice and his son were released, and ordered to leave, which they did, of course. They had not gone much over three-fourths of a mile before they heard firing at the point at which they had left the soldiers with the remaining prisoners. In a short time the command moved on, and the wives and other relatives of the prisoners rushed up to ascertain their fate. It was a horrid spectacle.