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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3 3 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 3 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Richard or search for Richard in all documents.

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e, the gravel pit so called, bounded, westerly on land in possession of Jonathan Tufts 10 1/2 rods; northerly on said Tufts' land next to the Marsh 7 rods, together with a two pole way leading down to the River above the upper side of the Bridge: easterly on the County road 10 1/2 rods: southerly upon the way that leads to the Ford or landing place 9 rods, which way is laid out two rods wide. The dwelling house above described will be recognized by old residents of the city as that of Mr. Richard and Miss Emily Tufts, which stood where the brick engine-house now stands, and which was destroyed in the great fire of 1850. The foregoing evidence proves conclusively that the southerly end of the ford was located as before stated. There is, however, no such positive evidence as to the landing on the north side of the river. It is well known that a landing place once existed there. But conjecture becomes certainty when we consider that the northerly end of the ford must have been