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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate Army. (search)
: 61st N. C.,----; Holcombe (S. C.) Legion,----. Hunton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Eppa Hunton: 8th Va., Capt. H. C. Bowie; 19th Va., Capt. J. G. Woodson; 25th Va. (Battalion), Lieut.-Col. W. M. Elliott; 32d Va., Col. E. B. Montague; 56th Va., Capt. John Richardson; 42d Va. Cav. Batt'n, Lieut.-Col. W. T. Robins. Maryland Line, Col. Bradley T. Johnson : 2d Md. Inf., Capt. J. P. Crane; 1st Md. Cav., Lieut.-Col. Ridgely Brown; 1st Md. Battery, Capt. W. F. Dement; 2d Md. Battery, Capt. W. H. Griffin; 4tt'n. Maj. M. B. Hardin; 20th Va. H. A. Batt'n, Maj. J. E. Robertson. Unattached: La. Guard Art'y, Capt. C. A. Green. Chaffin's Bluff, Lieut.-Col. J. M. Maury. Goochland (Va.) Art'y, Capt. Jonathan Talley; James City (Va.) Art'y, Capt. L. W, Richardson; Lunenburg (Va.) Art'y, Capt. C. T. Allen; Pamunkey (Va.) Art'y, Capt. A. J. Jones. Drewry's Bluff, Maj. F. W. Smith. Johnston (Va.) Art'y, Capt. Branch J. Epes; Neblett (Va.) Art'y, Capt. W. G. Coleman; Southside (Va.) Art'y, Capt. J. W. D
B. Fitch1830. John King1831. John Symmes, jun1832. Thomas R. Peck1834. Galen James1836. James O. Curtis1837. Galen James1838. Lewis Richardson1839. Thomas R. Peck1840. Alexander Gregg1841. Timothy Cotting1844. Alexander Gregg1845. Henry Withington1847. Peter C. Hall1849. James O. Curtis1850. Peter C. Hall1853. Benjamin H. Samson1855. Names of the treasurers. Stephen Willis1696. John Bradstreet1700. Samuel Wade1709. John Whitmore1714. William Willis1725. John Richardson1727. Edward Brooks1728. Samuel Brooks1729. Stephen Hall1733. Edward Brooks1735. Benjamin Parker1743. Edward Brooks1750. Thomas Brooks1756. Aaron Hall1761. Thomas Brooks1763. James Wyman1767. Jonathan Patten1778. Richard Hall1786. Jonathan Porter1790. Isaac Warren1793. Samuel Buel1794. John Bishop1798. Joseph P. Hall1804. Joseph Manning1808. William Rogers1823. Henry Porter1825. Turell Tufts1827. Timothy Cotting1836. George W. Porter1837. Names of the town-cle
arrant granted for said meeting; and also, it being contrary to a former vote of the town. John Bradshaw, Selectmen. Thomas Tufts, Selectmen. John Willis. John Richardson. Benjamin Willis. Benjamin Parker. John Bradshaw, jun. Nathaniel Hall. John Grattan. Jonathan Bradshaw. Peter Seccombe. John Hall. Thomas Willis. Peng of the house. The committee appointed to determine the size and shape of the house were Thomas Tufts, Esq., Captain Ebenezer Brooks, Mr. Peter Seccombe, Mr. John Richardson, Captain Samuel Brooks, Mr. John Willis, Mr. William Willis, Lieutenant Stephen Hall, Mr. John Francis, Mr. Benjamin Parker, and Mr. John Whitmore. They reptain Samuel Brooks, Lieutenant Stephen Hall, Mr. Peter Seccombe, Thomas Tufts, Esq., Captain Samuel Wade, Francis Whitmore, John Willis, Mr. John Whitmore, Mr. John Richardson, William Willis, Mr. Jonathan Hall, Mr. Peter Tufts, Deacon Thomas Hall, Mr. Benjamin Willis, Mr. Benjamin Porter, Mr. Thomas Oaks, Dr. Simon Tufts, Mr. Joh
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arctic exploration. (search)
st of the American continent in the spring of 1847. Sir John Franklin yet believed a northwest passage possible. With two vessels — the Erebus and Terror--each fitted with a small steam-engine and screw-propeller, he sailed from England May 19, 1845. They were seen by a whale-ship, in July, about to enter Lancaster Sound, and were never heard of afterwards. The British government despatched three expeditions in search of them in 1848. One of them was an overland expedition under Sir John Richardson, who traversed the northern coast of America 800 miles, in 1848, without finding Franklin. The sea expedition was equally unfortunate. Dr. Rae failed in an overland search in 1850. Three more expeditions were sent out by the British government in search in 1850; and from Great Britain five others were fitted out by private means. One was also sent by the United States government, chiefly at the cost of Henry Grinnell, a New York merchant. It was commanded by Lieutenant De Haven, o
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blackburn's Ford, battle at. (search)
ord. This ford was guarded by a Confederate force under Gen. James Longstreet. Some National troops under Gen. D. Tyler, a part of McDowell's advancing army, went out towards this ford on a reconnoissance on the 18th. The troops consisted of Richardson's brigade, a squadron of cavalry, and Ayres's battery. Sherman's brigade was held in reserve. He found the Confederates there in strong force, partly concealed by woods. Hoping to draw their fire and discover their exact position, a 20-pound gun of Ayres's batter fired a slot at random among them. A battery in view only responded with grape-shot. Richardson sent forward the 2d Michigan Regiment as skirmishers, who were soon engaged in a hot contest on low ground. The 3d Michigan, 1st Massachusetts, and 12th New York pushed forward, and were son fighting severely. Cavalry and two howitzers were fiercely assailed by musketry and a concealed battery, when the Nationals, greatly outnumbered, recoiled and withdrew behind Ayres's batt
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bull Run, battles of. (search)
e to keep Johnston in the valley. On the morning of July 21, McDowell's forces were set in motion in three columns, one under General Tyler on the Warrenton road, to make a feigned attack, and the other two, commanded respectively by Generals Hunter and Heintzelman, taking a wide circuit more to the left, to cross Bull Run at different points and make a real attack on Beauregard's left wing, which was to be menaced by Tyler. The Confederate right was to be threatened by troops under Colonels Richardson and Davies, moving from Centreville. These movements were all executed, but with so much delay that it was nearly noon before the battle began. Meanwhile the Confederates had made a movement unknown to McDowell. The Confederate government, just seated at Richmond, hearing of the movements of the Nationals, immediately ordered Johnston to hasten from the valley, and reinforce Beauregard. This was done at noon (July 20) with 6,000 fresh troops. Hunter's column crossed Bull Run at
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 15: ecclesiastical History. (search)
is life were years of trial, mental excitement, and severe labor, partly in the proper work of the ministry, and partly resulting from his connection with the College. For a more extended notice of Mr. Oakes, see Sibley's Harvard Graduates, 173-185, and McKenzie's Lectures, 120-127. Within a year after his ordination as pastor of the church in Cambridge, he was elected Fellow of Harvard College, which office he (together with three of his associates, Thomas Shepard, Joseph Brown, and John Richardson) very soon resigned, under somewhat questionable circumstances. The overseers of the College requested them to resume the office; but they declined, until March 15, 1674-5, the day on which President Hoar sent in his resignation. On the same day, Oakes and Shepard took their seats as members of the Corporation, and the seat Dr. Hoar had quitted was given to the Rev. Mr. Oakes. He hesitated to accept the office, but at length consented to perform its duties as President pro tem., whi
t at length when he had attained extreme old age he made his peace with the brethren and was restored to communion 22 Dec. 1706. He d. 5 June 1708, a. 87, as inscribed on his gravestone; his w. Mary d. 11 Feb. 1702, a. 69. 2. Gershom, s. of John (1), m. Sarah Holden 20 Dec. 1677, and had Sarah, b. about 1679, d. unm. 25 Ap. 1699, a. 20; Rebecca, b. 24 Aug. 1681, d. young; John, b. 3 Oct. 1683; Ruth, b. 25 Dec. 1685, m. Theophilus Richardson of Woburn; Abigail, b. 12 Feb. 1686-7, m. John Richardson of Woburn 1 July 1714; Lydia, b. 10 Nov. 1689, m. William Mansur of Medf. 2 Feb. 1714-15; Rebecca, bap. 14 Aug. 1698, m. George Abbott 2 Feb. 1714-15; and perhaps others between 1689 and 1698. Gershom the f. res. at Menot. and d. 2 July 1708, a. 54; his w. Sarah survived. 3. Ebenezer, s. of John (1), by w. Elizabeth, had Elizabeth, b. 29 Mar. 1699; Sarah, b. 26 Feb. 1700-1701, m. Ephraim Cook, 14 Dec. 1727; Ebenezer, b. 23 Mar. 1703-4; Mary, b. 4 Mar. 1706-7; Samuel, b. 5 Ap. 171
t at length when he had attained extreme old age he made his peace with the brethren and was restored to communion 22 Dec. 1706. He d. 5 June 1708, a. 87, as inscribed on his gravestone; his w. Mary d. 11 Feb. 1702, a. 69. 2. Gershom, s. of John (1), m. Sarah Holden 20 Dec. 1677, and had Sarah, b. about 1679, d. unm. 25 Ap. 1699, a. 20; Rebecca, b. 24 Aug. 1681, d. young; John, b. 3 Oct. 1683; Ruth, b. 25 Dec. 1685, m. Theophilus Richardson of Woburn; Abigail, b. 12 Feb. 1686-7, m. John Richardson of Woburn 1 July 1714; Lydia, b. 10 Nov. 1689, m. William Mansur of Medf. 2 Feb. 1714-15; Rebecca, bap. 14 Aug. 1698, m. George Abbott 2 Feb. 1714-15; and perhaps others between 1689 and 1698. Gershom the f. res. at Menot. and d. 2 July 1708, a. 54; his w. Sarah survived. 3. Ebenezer, s. of John (1), by w. Elizabeth, had Elizabeth, b. 29 Mar. 1699; Sarah, b. 26 Feb. 1700-1701, m. Ephraim Cook, 14 Dec. 1727; Ebenezer, b. 23 Mar. 1703-4; Mary, b. 4 Mar. 1706-7; Samuel, b. 5 Ap. 171
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
with an elevated moral and intellectual tone, and full of a kindliness that was not to be mistaken. We determined to pass the day in an excursion up Coniston Water, generally considered the most beautiful of the lakes, and he said he would go with us,—a great addition to a great pleasure. . . . . To show us the best points he carried us to the houses of two of his friends. The first was Mrs. Copley's, where we met Miss Fletcher, See ante, p. 279. Miss Fletcher afterwards married Sir John Richardson, the Arctic explorer. formerly of Edinburgh, and one or two other quite agreeable people, and where we stopped long enough to lunch with them. . . . . The other place was that of the venerable Mrs. Smith,—the mother of the extraordinary Elizabeth Smith,— where, besides the fine views, we saw the cottage, the site of the tent which has given the name of Tent Hall to the place,. . . . and the other localities mentioned in the beautiful Fragments, printed after her premature death. . . .<
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