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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 3 Browse Search
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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
gainst Jackson's right and center, two of his divisions (Richardson's and French's) operating east of the turnpike and south. Fresh, strong and admirably handled, the divisions of Richardson, French and Sedgwick moved to renew the waning battle. Richardson, supported by French, moved against D. H. Hill's left center, and Sedgwick attacked in front and north of the chuhich Sumner had advanced. Sedgwick was overwhelmed, but Richardson retired in order. The attack of Sumner on Lee's left anl-provided camp. But Sumner's work was not yet done. Richardson and French, supported by their famous batteries, many ofoyce's battery. With these troops Hill met and repelled Richardson's first advance. General Lee sent up R. H. Anderson's dnt line and a broad gap left in Hill's defense. At once Richardson saw his advantage and pressed his troops into and beyondnt in Hill's defense of the center against the attack of Richardson in the afternoon. After graduating at the head of the
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
Pringle, disabling several of the guns. To relieve the exhausted garrison at the latter point, Colonel Rhett was assigned and Major Blanding with two companies of the First artillery. Battery Tynes was also under fire, but ably defended by Captain Richardson, of Lucas' battalion. General Taliaferro gave his loss in the campaign at 10 killed and 25 wounded. He particularly commended the gallantry of the men on his advanced line under unremitting fire for eight days and nights from the enemy'sajor Manigault, Major Blanding, Capts. R. P. Smith, Dickson, Warley, Rivers, Witherspoon, Burnet, Humbert, Stallings, Kennedy, Porcher Smith and Trezevant. The Stono batteries, under Majors Lucas and Blanding, were commanded by Captains Hayne, Richardson, Rhett, King, Lieutenants Ogier (specially distinguished), Martin, Reveley, Lucas, Ford and Stuart. Lieutenant-Colonel Brown at Fort Lamar, and the light batteries under Captain Wheaton, did good service, and Colonels Black, Frederick and Rhet
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
889 he was appointed trial justice for Charleston county by Gov. J. P. Richardson and was continued in the same office by Governor Tillman. lina legislature. In 1890 he was appointed trial justice by Governor Richardson, an office which he held until the Tillman administration. luential and respected citizen. He served on the staff of Gov. John P. Richardson, of South Carolina as lieutenant-colonel and aide-de-camp.ounty clerk in the State at the time of his appointment by Gov. John P. Richardson, being only twenty-four years old. He has been commander swn of Belton, where he has made his home for many years. John Peter Richardson, ex-governor of South Carolina, was born in Clarendon county, September as, 1829, son of John Peter Richardson, who represented South Carolina in Congress and was elected governor in 1840. The latter was the son of John Peter Richardson, son of Gen. Richard Richardson, a native of Virginia who removed to Clarendon county in colonial time