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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
ll — Divisions: Franklin, McCall, and King; Second Corps, Sumner — Divisions: Richardson, Blenker, and Sedgwick; Third Corps, Heintzelman — Divisions: Porter, Hooker, the three divisions yet to join, Casey's reached the front only on the 17th, Richardson's on the 16th, and Hooker's commenced arriving at Ship Point on the 10th. Whketch made May 4, 1862. House, Hooker and Kearny near Roper's Church, and Richardson and Sedgwick near Eltham. On the 15th and 16th, in the face of dreadful weathe Potomac was now as follows: Second Corps, Sumner — Divisions, Sedgwick and Richardson; Third Corps, Heintzelman — Divisions, Kearny and Hooker; Fourth Corps, Keyeseported his position as critical, and the brigades of French and Meagher — of Richardson's division — were ordered to reenforce him, although the fearless commander once on Richmond. General Franklin, with Smith's division of his own Corps, Richardson's of the Second, and Naglee's brigade were charged with the defense of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Manassas to Seven Pines. (search)
wn without reenforcements, being satisfied that the result of Hancock's engagement was to give us possession of the decisive point of the battle-field, (luring the night I countermanded the order for the advance of the divisions of Sedgwick and Richardson and directed them to return to Yorktown. . . . On the next morning we found the enemy's position abandoned, and occupied Fort Magruder and the town of Williamsburg, which was filled with the enemy's wounded. . . . Colonel Averell was sent forwatance below West Point, on the south side of York River, and moved into a thick wood in the direction of the New Kent road, thus threatening the flank of our line of march. [McClellan wrote that the divisions of Franklin, Sedgwick, Porter, and Richardson were sent from Yorktown by water to the right bank of the Pamunkey, near West Point.--J. E. J.] Two brigades of General G. W. Smith's division, Hampton's and Hood's, were detached under the command of General Whiting to dislodge the enemy, whic
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. The composition, losses, and strength of each army as here stated give the gist of all the data obtainable in the Official Records. K stands for killed; w for wounded; m w for mortally wounded; m for captured or missing; c for captured. The Union Army. Major-General George B. McClellan. Second Army Corps, Brig.-Gen. Edwin V. Sumner. first division, Brig.-Gen. Israel B. Richardson. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Oliver 0. Howard (w), Col. Thomas J. Parker: 5th N. H., Col. E. E. Cross (w), Lieut.-Col. Samuel G. Langley; 61st N. Y., Col. Francis C. Barlow; 64th N. Y., Col. T. J. Parker, Capt. Rufus Washburn; 81st Pa., Col. James Miller (k), Lieut.-Col. Charles F. Johnson. Brigade loss: k, 95; w, 398; in, 64=557. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Thomas F. Meagher: 63d N. Y., Col. John Burke; 69th N. Y., Col. Robert Nugent; 88th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Patrick Kelly. Brigade loss: k, 7; w, 31; m, 1=39. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William H
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
ilroad, a short distance east of Fair Oaks. Richardson's division was on Sedgwick's left, in three railroad, with four batteries. In front of Richardson's position was a dense and tangled wood; on lines and numerous batteries of Sedgwick and Richardson; the other was to strip the Chickahominy of Kearny's division. In his official report, Richardson says: Near our left two roads crossed tht of Howard's brigade on the extreme left of Richardson's front line was broken, fell back behind ths forced back a short distance. The left of Richardson's front line was so rudely shaken that all alled and hurriedly sent by General Sumner to Richardson's assistance. It will be seen later that this staggering blow against the left of Richardson's line was from three regiments of Armistead's bf Mahone's brigades engaged in the attack on Richardson's line. But General Mahone, in a letter to 's brigade that attacked the extreme left of Richardson's line. The effect produced by that attack [4 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
B. Stuart. Brigade loss: m, 12. Battalion U. S. Engineers, Capt. James C. Duane. Loss: w, 2; m, 9==11. Casey's Command (at White House), Brig.-Gen. Silas Casey: 4th Pa. Cav. (squadron), Capt. William Shorts; 11th Pa. Cav. (5 co's), Col. Josiah Harlan; F, 1st N. Y. Arty., Capt. Wm. R. Wilson; 93d N. Y. (6 co's), Col. Thos. F. Morris. Second Corps, Brig.-Gen. E. V. Sumner. Staff loss: w, 1, Cavalry: D, F, H, and K, 6th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Duncan McVicar. first division, Brig.-Gen. Israel B. Richardson. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John C. Caldwell: 5th N. H., Lieut.-Col. Samuel G. Langley, Capt. Edward E,, Sturtevant; 7th N. Y., Col. George W. von Schack; 61st N. Y., Col. Francis C. Barlow; 81st Pa., Col. Charles F. Johnson (w), Lieut.-Col. Ell T. Conner (k), Maj. H. Boyd McKeen. Brigade loss: k, 61; w, 356; m, 137 == 554. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Thomas F. Meagher, Col. Robert Nugent, Brig.-Gen. Thomas F. Meagher: 29th Mass., Col. Ebenezer W. Peirce (w), Lieut.-Col. Joseph
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Rear-guard fighting during the change of base. (search)
orps, consisting of General John Sedgwick's and General Israel B. Richardson's divisions, arrived about 2 P. M. Running amr two brigades being just behind. The three brigades of Richardson's division, Meagher having joined him, were farther to tllan at his headquarters. The rear of Sumner's corps, Richardson's division, crossed the bridge at 10 o'clock in the mornfight at Savage's Station was over, Hazzard's battery of Richardson's division was unhitched, its captain not supposing therut harm at the White Oak Bridge at that pace just as General Richardson was on the point of destroying it. He found on the r got under cover of the wood, except Caldwell's brigade [Richardson's division], which was guarding the batteries. It remait of General Sumner, Caldwell's and Meager's brigades of Richardson's division were also sent to reenforce him. No other e Club, New York. to the James River by that road. General Richardson, with French's brigade, was instructed to remain, to
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
12th Pa., Capt. Richard Gustin. Brigade loss: South Mountain, k, 32; w, 100 == 132. Antietam, k, 37; w, 136; m, 2 == 175. Artillery: A, 1st Pa., Lieut. John G. Simpson; B, 1st Pa., Capt. James H. Cooper; C, .5th U. S., Capt. Dunbar R. Ransom. Artillery loss: Antietam, k, 3; w, 18 == 21. Second Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. Edwin V. Sumner. Staff loss: Antietam, w, 2. Escort: D and K, 6th N. Y. Cav., Capts. Henry W. Lyon and Riley Johnson. Loss: Antietam, w, 1. first division, Maj.-Gen. Israel B. Richardson (mi w), Brig.-Gen. John C. Caldwell, Brig.-Gen. Winfield S. Hancock. Staff loss: Antietam, w, 2. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John C. Caldwell: 5th N. H., Col. Edward E. Cross; 7th N. Y., Capt. Chas. Brestel; 61st and 64th N. Y., Col. Francis C. Barlow (w), Lieut.-Col. Nelson A. Miles; 81st Pa., Maj. H. Boyd McKeen. Brigade loss: Antietam, k. 44; w, 268; m, 2 == 314. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Thomas F. Meagher, Col. John Burke: 29th Mass., Lieut.-Col. Joseph H. Barnes; 63d N.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in Maryland. (search)
e victorious Sedgwick. He drove Sedgwick back into the Dunker wood and beyond it, into the open ground. Farther to our right, the pendulum of battle had been swinging to and fro, with D. H. Hill and R. H. Anderson hammering away at French and Richardson, until the sunken road became historic as bloody lane. Richardson was mortally wounded and Hancock assumed command of his division. Brigadier-General William E. Starke. From a Tintype. In the cannonade which began with dawn of the 17th, Richardson was mortally wounded and Hancock assumed command of his division. Brigadier-General William E. Starke. From a Tintype. In the cannonade which began with dawn of the 17th, General J. R. Jones, commanding the left division of Jackson, was stunned and injured by a shell which exploded directly over his head. General Starke was directed to take command of the division, which he led against Hooker, and a half-hour later he fell pierced by three minie-balls. Of that terrible struggle Stonewall Jackson says in his report: The carnage on both sides was terrific. At this early hour General Starke was killed. Colonel Douglass, commanding Lawton's brigade, was also kill
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Antietam. (search)
t the time that Sedgwick charged, French and Richardson, of Sumner's corps, dislodged D. H. Hill's lpleted by straggling, so that Major-General Israel B. Richardson. From a photograph. Referrinhis report to the incidents accompanying General Richardson's fall, General Caldwell says: The enemy grape-shot in the groin. By command of General Richardson I halted the brigade, and, drawing back osed to a heavy artillery fire, by which General Richardson was severely wounded. The fall of Generd of the division by General McClellan. General Richardson was carried to Pry's house, McClellan's hardson's being still delayed Sumner says Richardson came about an hour later. Howard, who succengs, drove D. H. Hill's division from them. Richardson's division came up on French's left soon aft dead who had defended it with their lives. Richardson had been mortally wounded, and Hancock had bthat they were French's men, or French's and Richardson's. No others fought on that part of the fiel[8 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Antietam scenes. (search)
the artillery of the Ninth Corps was thundering. Porter, I remember, was with McClellan, watching the movements of the troops across the Antietam--French's and Richardson's divisions, which were forming in the fields east of Roulette's and Mumma's houses. What a splendid sight it was! How beautifully the lines deployed! The cle was another gleam in the sunshine from the bayonets of their troops, who were apparently getting into position to resist the threatened movement of French and Richardson. Memory recalls the advance of the line of men in blue across the meadow east of Roulette's. They reach the spacious barn, which divides the line of men as ae into play. The arrival of A. P. Hill had a stimulating effect upon Lee's veterans, while the carrying of the bridge and the work accomplished by French's and Richardson's divisions in the center gave great encouragement to the Union army. It was plain that Lee was economical in the use of artillery ammunition. In fact, he had