Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Richmond or search for Richmond in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
, and proud of our brigade and regiment. Feb. 25. Private L. Williams came from furlough, and was pained to hear his son had killed a fellow soldier in the 21st Ala. Our soldiers seldom have serious difficulties, but get along most harmoniously. Feb. 26. Hired Charles, servant of Private Kimbrough, for one year, at $25.00 per month, Charles is a good cook and forager. At night I attended a Grand Ball at Dr. Terrell's, to which I contributed $25.00. Gen. Ramseur and his bride, nee Miss Richmond, of N. C., were present. Pretty women and officers in gay Confederate gray uniforms, were a lovely sight to look upon. Mrs. Carter, formerly Miss Taliaferro (since Mrs. John H. Lamar and Mrs. Harry Day, of Georgia), was one of the brightest belles. (note.—Next portion of Diary to April 14th, lost.) While in camp near Fredericksburg obtained a week's furlough to visit Richmond, and went there with Dr. Geo. Whitfield, our beloved surgeon. Stopped at Hatton's, on Mayo street betwe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), William Henry Chase Whiting, Major-General C. S. Army. (search)
l do their utmost to the last. (Signed) W. H. C. Whiting, Brig.-Gen. Commanding. James H. Hill, Chief of Staff. The ceaseless labor went on day after day, month after month, heaping up defensive works, driving palisades, sounding the channels (for the treacherous sands of that inlet give new directien to the channel after every storm from the sea), protecting commerce, and the routine of the command, complicated as the great forwarding depot of the South; but he never ceased to warn Richmond that stationary fortifications alone could not accomplish the impossible task of holding the port; there must be a supporting force of troops to meet at once troops embarked by the enemy, as they would be out of reach of the guns of the fort, whether on Oak Island or near Fort Fisher. Meanwhile events were rapidly progressing elsewhere, and the sad story of repeated Confederate losses was growing familiar. The following remarkable letter from General Joseph E. Johnston deserves record
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
e in the miracles of his valor and the skill of his leaders, he concentrated what he could of scant numbers, and won victory at Kingston and Bentonville, in the vain hope to save North Carolina, and repel the army which had struck at the life of Richmond from its rear. Here he struggled to the last at Blakely and Mobile, and vainly gave his blood at Selma. One of Lee's last dispatches to Richmond gives the sad picture of the suffering of the troops everywhere: Yesterday, the most incleRichmond gives the sad picture of the suffering of the troops everywhere: Yesterday, the most inclement day of the winter, the troops had to be maintained in line of battle; having been in the same condition two previous days and nights. I regret to be compelled to state that, under these circumstances, heightened by the assaults and fire of the enemy, some of the men have been without meat for three days, and all are suffering from reduced rations, scant clothing, exposed to battle, cold, hail and sleet * * Their physical strength, if their courage survives, must fail under the treatment.