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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 185 17 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 160 8 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 71 3 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 44 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 44 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 40 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 30 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 29 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Ricketts or search for Ricketts in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
Thirteen others, drawn by lot, were placed in close confinement to await the issue of the hanging of the crew of the Savannah. They were as finally settled—Captains Ricketts and Mc-Quade, who had drawn fatal numbers, on account of their wounds being substituted by others—Colonels Lee, Cogswell, Wilcox, Woodruff and Woods; Lieutenochie. For Johnston waits to strike his crawling foe. But Peach-Tree Creek soon called us to our work, and in defending its passage we lose Legare and Percy and Ricketts. Legare, who begged for one more shot at them, and fell with Percy, torn and mangled, before he could get it. First on the right, then through the siege, the1st was fought the battle of Manassas, and again did the battalion do yeoman service. Posted upon the ridge, near the Henry House, they fought the batteries of Ricketts and Griffin, which were finally abandoned on the field. It was a case very similar to the description given by the Duke of Wellington to a lady, who asked him a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of Libby prison. (search)
l Corcoran was the first drawn out of the urn, to be held as a hostage for Captain Smith, of the privateer Jefferson Davis, who had been condemned to be hung in Philadelphia. Colonel Corcoran was given to understand that he would be hung on the day after authentic information was received that Captain Smith had been put to death. Thirteen others, drawn by lot, were placed in close confinement to await the issue of the hanging of the crew of the Savannah. They were as finally settled—Captains Ricketts and Mc-Quade, who had drawn fatal numbers, on account of their wounds being substituted by others—Colonels Lee, Cogswell, Wilcox, Woodruff and Woods; Lieutenant-Colonels Bowman and Neff; Majors Potter, Revere and Vogdes; Captains Rockwood, Bowman and Keffer. None of the privateers were executed, and the hostages were subsequently released and exchanged. An interesting episode took place in relation to Colonel E. Raymond Lee, of Boston, in connection with these transactions. A few d
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
tain, haven't I done my duty? Can Pine Mountain and Kennesaw Ridge ever be forgotten? those long days of constant fighting, those nights of sleepless vigilance and recurring labor, those works uncarried, where Barrail fell and Staub received his death wound. For once, since leaving Dalton, we find ourselves across the Chattahoochie. For Johnston waits to strike his crawling foe. But Peach-Tree Creek soon called us to our work, and in defending its passage we lose Legare and Percy and Ricketts. Legare, who begged for one more shot at them, and fell with Percy, torn and mangled, before he could get it. First on the right, then through the siege, the Fifth Company battles for Atlanta, till Hood must leave, for Jonesboroa is gone, and Hardee's heroic corps can stand the pressure no longer. Here Frazer, Vincent, Delery, find their death, and also that unrecorded priest who followed us into battle. And now it is on to Nashville. In snow we move from Florence to the task, ill cl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
ery were all that could be desired. The officers and men engaged, won for their battalion a distinction, which I feel assured will never be tarnished, and which will even serve to urge them and their corps to high endeavor. The engagement of the 18th was but the prelude to the opening scenes upon the theatre of the war. On the 21st was fought the battle of Manassas, and again did the battalion do yeoman service. Posted upon the ridge, near the Henry House, they fought the batteries of Ricketts and Griffin, which were finally abandoned on the field. It was a case very similar to the description given by the Duke of Wellington to a lady, who asked him at a dinner party to describe to her the battle of Waterloo. The battle of Waterloo, ma'am? Why, we pommelled the French, they pommelled us, and we pommelled the hardest, so we gained the day. Stonewall Jackson and Bee's brigades supported and fought with our guns. During the heaviest of the conflict, when shell and bullet were fa