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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Fighting Jackson at Kernstown. (search)
osition. Our command was aroused from its slumbers early on the morning of the 1st of June by the roar of cannon away to our left toward Strasburg. Fremont had passed over the mountains and attacked Jackson's forces at Fisher's Hill. General Shields, at Front Royal, was informed of the fight going on at Strasburg and came to the front, but declined to send our forces to join in the fight, and directed us to remain in our position to await the arrival of General Irvin McDowell and Ord's (Ricketts's) division. General McDowell arrived on the evening of June 1st. Ord's division relieved ours in front, and Bayard's cavalry was sent to aid Fremont, Our division returned to Front Royal and encamped two miles south on the road to Luray. By the wisdom (?) of Generals McDowell and Shields, our division was sent up the Luray valley, east of the south branch of the Shenandoah and Massanutten mountain, while Jackson's army, pursued by Fremont, was moving up the valley, along the Staunto
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
l's corps widely separated, King's division at Fredericksburg, and Ricketts's at and beyond Manassas Junction. The general purpose at that ont Royal and proceed by way of Chester Gap to Little Washington. Ricketts's division of McDowell's corps, then at and beyond Manassas Junctiut 8000 men, under Generals C. C. Augur and A. S. Williams. General J. B. Ricketts's division, of McDowell's corps, was coming up as support. ont toward the pike and attack the enemy's left flank. For a time Ricketts's division of McDowell's corps was placed in support of this movemforce our left. General McDowell was therefore directed to recall Ricketts's division from our right, and put it so as to strengthen our leftand the brigade of Milroy, who were soon reinforced on the left by Ricketts's. division. The action was severe for several hours, the enemy b the final result in that part of the field. Tower's brigade of Ricketts's division was pushed forward to his support, and the brigade was
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Cedar Mountain, Va.: August 9th, 1862. (search)
de loss: w, 3; m, 23 = 26. Artillery, Capt. Clermont L. Best: 4th Me., Capt. O'Neil W. Robinson; 6th Me., Capt. Freeman McGilvery; K, 1st N. Y., Capt. Lorenzo Crounse; L, 1st N. Y., Capt. John A. Reynolds; M, 1st N. Y., Capt. George W. Cothran; L, 2d N. Y., Capt. Jacob Roemer; 10th N. Y.. Capt. John T. Bruen; E, Pa., Capt. Joseph M. Knap; F, 4th U. S., Lieut. E. D. Muhlenberg. Artillery loss: k, 7; w, 27; m, 6 = 40. Third Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. Irvin McDowell. Second division, Brig.-Gen. James B. Ricketts. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Abram Duryea: 97th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. John P. Spofford; 104th N. Y., Maj. Lewis C. Skinner; 105th N. Y., Col. James M. Fuller; 107th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Robert W. McAllen. Brigade loss: w, 12; m, 1=13. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Zealous B. Tower: 26th N. Y., Col. William H. Christian; 94th N. Y., Col. Adrian R. Root; 88th Pa., Col. George P. McLean; 90th Pa., Col. Peter Lyle. Brigade loss: w, 1. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George L. Hartsuff: 12th Mass., Co
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at the Second Bull Run. August 16th-September 2d, 1862. (search)
r Cutler (w), Lieut.-Col. Edward S. Bragg; 7th Wis., Col. William W. Robinson (w), Lieut.-Col. Charles A. Hamilton (w), Lieut.-Col. Lucius Fairchild; 19th Ind., Col. Solomon Meredith. Brigade loss: k, 148; w, 626; m, 120 = 894. Artillery, 1st N. H., Capt. George A. Gerrish (c), Lieut. Frederick M. Edgell; D, 1st R. I., Capt. J. Albert Monroe; L, 1st N. Y., Capt. John A. Reynolds; B, 4th U. S., Capt. Joseph B. Campbell. Artillery loss: k, 7; w, 25; m, 14 = 46. Second division, Brig.-Gen. James B. Ricketts. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Abram Duryea: 97th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. John P. Spofford; 104th N. Y., Maj. Lewis C. Skinner; 105th N. Y., Col. Howard Carroll; 107th Pa., Col. Thomas F. McCoy. Brigade loss: k, 29; w, 138; m, 224 = 391. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Zealous B. Tower (w), Col. William H. Christian: 26th N. Y., Col. William H. Christian, Lieut.-Col. Richard I. Richardson; 94th N. Y., Col. Adrian R. Root (w); 88th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Joseph A. McLean (k), Maj. George W. Gile; 90t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Jackson's raid around Pope. (search)
gade under Anderson down to occupy the pass. As the Confederates neared the gap from one side, Ricketts's division of Federals approached from the other and took possession of the east side. Thorouggetting over, and our apprehensions were relieved at the early dawn of the 29th by finding that Ricketts had given up the east side of the gap and was many View of Jackson's position as seen from Grce, instead of marching around Jackson, could have been thrown against his right and rear. If Ricketts had made this move and the forces in front had cooperated with him, such an attack, well handleoad. A Federal corps was reported to be at Manassas Junction that morning, and we trail-traced Ricketts's division from Thoroughfare Gap toward the same point; my line was now arranged for attack in ograph. Colonel Webster (son of Daniel Webster) commanded the 12th Massachusetts Volunteers (Ricketts's division) and was mortally wounded August 30th, in the defense of Bald Hill [see map, p. 482]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The time of Longstreet's arrival at Groveton. (search)
iles and a half in the night to reach a point less than half a mile from where I had started. We passed through the gap and camped that night on the ground that Ricketts's troops had held in the afternoon. The second battle of Bull Run was practically decided at Thoroughfare Gap. Had McDowell's whole corps been assigned to the itz John Porter had come at that time they might have caught me, that is, if their horses were faster than mine. ... On the evening of the 28th, Longstreet drove Ricketts's division from Thoroughfare, and the head of his column bivouacked within about six miles of Jackson. During the fight I rode with Stuart toward Thoroughfare Gap. As Ricketts was then between him and Longstreet, Stuart sent a dispatch by a trusty messenger urging him [Longstreet] to press on to the support of Jackson. And in a letter to the editors, referring to the above, Colonel Mosby says: You will also see that I make some new points in Fitz John Porter's case. I was a wit
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.61 (search)
t I should then and there take them back on the line of retreat and let them snatch victory out of defeat. In November, 1887, George Kimball of Boston wrote to the editors: Though a quarter of a century has passed since those darkest days of the war, I still retain a vivid remembrance of the sudden and complete change which came upon the face of affairs when General McClellan was restored to command. At the time, I was serving in Company A, 12th Massachusetts Volunteers, attached to Ricketts's division of the First Army Corps. The announcement of McClellan's restoration came to us in the early evening of the 2d of September, 1862, just after reaching Hall's Hill, weary from long marching and well-nigh disheartened by recent reverses. The men were scattered about in groups, discussing the events of their ill-starred campaign, and indulging in comments that were decidedly uncomplimentary to those who had been responsible for its mismanagement. We did not know, of course, the e
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
ck, and Gibbon--17 regiments and 4 batteries. General Ricketts, division commander, had under him the brigadeery opened fire at 3:30. Hatch followed Meade, and Ricketts moved last.--Editors. while General Ricketts, who General Ricketts, who took part in the same movement, says that he did not arrive at the foot of the mountain until 5 P. M. If Genern the north side of the pike, with the division of Ricketts in supporting distance in rear. A belt of woods hflanked, sent for and obtained Duryea's brigade of Ricketts's division. It was pitiable to see the gallant buammunition of the brigade was just giving out when Ricketts relieved Doubleday. Several of the reports speak of the superior force of the enemy. General Ricketts says that he relieved Doubleday hard-pressed and nearly out of ammunition. Before Ricketts came in person with Hartsuff's brigade, he had sent Christian's brigade tod the division of Hatch aided by two brigades from Ricketts. But it is well known that the Virginia brigades
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Forcing Fox's Gap and Turner's Gap. (search)
impeded his advance, but did not check it. . . . At this moment word was received that the enemy were attempting to turn Meade's right, when Duryea's brigade, of Ricketts's division, was dispatched to thwart it, and reached there in good time to render substantial aid in this, and also in assisting their comrades in crowning the s his troops displaying the finest courage and determination. . . . Hatch being outnumbered, sorely pressed, and almost out of ammunition, Christian's brigade, of Ricketts's division, was ordered forward to strengthen him, and in this rendered good service. On this part of the field the resistance of the enemy was continued until er dark, and only subsided on his being driven from his position. It being very dark, our troops were directed to remain in position, and Hartsuff's brigade [of Ricketts's division] was brought up and formed a line across the valley, connecting with Meade's left and Hatch's right, and all were directed to sleep on their arms.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
; 6th Wis., Lieut.-Col. Edward S. Bragg (w), Maj. Rufus R. Dawes; 7th Wis., Capt. John B. Callis. Brigade loss: South Mountain, k, 37; w, 251; m, 30 == 318. Antietam, k, 68; w, 275; m, 5 == 348. Artillery, Capt. J. Albert Monroe: 1st N. Y., Lieut. Frederick M. Edgell; D, 1st R. I., Capt. J. Albert Monroe; L, 1st N. Y., Capt. John A. Reynolds; B, 4th U. S., Capt. Joseph B. Campbell (w), Lieut. James Stewart. Artillery loss: Antietam, k, 12; w, 46; m, 8 == 66. Second division, Brig.-Gen. James B. Ricketts. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Abram Duryea: 97th N. Y., Maj. Charles Northrup; 104th N. Y., Maj. Lewis C. Skinner; 105th N. Y,, Col. Howard Carroll; 107th Pa., Capt. James MacThomson. Brigade loss: South Mountain, k, 5; w, 16 == 21. Antietam, k, 59; w, 233; m, 35 == 327. Second Brigade, Col. William A. Christian, Col. Peter Lyle (w): 26th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Richard H. Richardson; 94th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Calvin Littlefield; 88th Pa., Lieut.-Col. George W. Gile (w), Capt. Henry R. M
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