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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 56 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Alonso Ridley or search for Alonso Ridley in all documents.

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riately only in the same way; and, indeed, a large part of the value of this work is due to their unselfish aid. But the writer cannot omit to express here his deep obligations to the Honorable Jefferson Davis, ex-President of the Confederate States; to the late General Braxton Bragg; to Governors I. G. Harris, John C. Brown, and James D. Porter, of Tennessee; to Colonel Edward W. Munford, General William Preston, General W. C. Whitthorne, General William J. Hamby, Dr. William M. Polk, Colonel A. Ridley, Captain G. W. Gift, and Captain N. J. Eaton. His late colleagues, Prof. Edward S. Joynes, now of Vanderbilt University, and Prof. Carter J. Harris, of Washington and Lee University, have given him most acceptable literary assistance. In addition to the writer's unusual opportunities for arriving at the truth, there were certain exceptional features in his relations to General Johnston, not often found between father and son. There was the utmost confidence and intimacy in their i
war, and now resides at Napa, California. Alonso Ridley, though of Northern birth, was deeply impral of General Johnston in Los Angeles, Captain Alonso Ridley Captain Ridley is now known as Cole party should consist of at least thirty men. Ridley undertook to collect the party, and to his tacdditional particulars are from a letter of Colonel Ridley. They vary in some unimportant respects f Men and animals fairly wilted. The general, Ridley, and myself, stood at the well and drew water journey. No effort was made to molest us. Ridley says: Traveling from Vallecito to Carrizo gers, some fourteen persons, murdered. Colonel Ridley adds: Some buzzards, wheeling about a For this purpose, his riding horse and two of Ridley's had been kept in good condition and unsaddlewhether we were troops of the line or Texans. Ridley said, troops of the line. Then said the Mexic the memory of his companions on this journey, Ridley relates this: At El Paso, a small party [18 more...]