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George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 25, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 4: the Valley of the Shenandoah (continued)—Return to Strasburg. (search)
her pretentious for the country, with a cupola affording our signal officers an extensive view; and across the road a store, which with the house was owned by one Rinker. As a Virginian, Rinker did not invite us to partake of his hospitality: both house and store were closed. While we rested, some of our men, becoming too inquisRinker did not invite us to partake of his hospitality: both house and store were closed. While we rested, some of our men, becoming too inquisitive, broke the fastenings to the store, and began to levy upon straw hats for the summer campaign. I had observed the unhappy Rinker flitting uneasily around, and was not unaware of his mingled emotions of rage, fear, and cupidity. The man had objected to the signal officers using his cupola, and had borne himself as one defiaome of his property; although enough was retained to punish what I then thought was one of the most pestilent Rebels that ever cursed the Yankees. What became of Rinker and his store during the campaigns that followed in the valley, I leave to the imagination to conceive. At about forty minutes after two I received a note from
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Index (search)
ain, 318, 319. Q Quincy, Captain, of the Second Mass. Regiment, 12. Quint, A. H., chaplain and historian of the Second Mass. Regiment, 6, 19 (notes), 90, 92, 105, 252, 285, 286 (note), 332 (note). R Ranson, James L., 109. Rebel quartermaster, a, the defenceless condition of his estate and family, 156, 157. Rebels, unarmed, male and female, experiences with, 158, 161, 162-164. Revere, Major, 70. Ricketts, General, division commander under McDowell, 278, 279, 330. Rinker, Mr., a Virginia Rebel and storekeeper,--how his disloyalty was rewarded, 153, 154. Roberts, General, staff-officer to Pope, 282. Ruger, Colonel, commands Third Wisconsin Regiment at battle of Cedar Mountain, 291. Rumors, reports, fears, and false alarms, 35, 36, 39-46, 61, 63, 64, 97, 99, 109-112, 163, 165, 166. Russell, H. S., captain in the Second Mass. Regiment,--captured in the battle of Cedar Mountain, 312. S. Savage, James, Captain, and afterwards Major, in the Secon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Very complete roll [from the Richmond, A., Dispatch, September 16th, 1900.] (search)
nsville, W. Va. Riddelle, Archibald S.—Wounded at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. Resides at Strasburg, Va. Rodeffer, Mark M.—Enlisted March, 1861, in Company A, 10th Mississippi Rifles. Engaged with Muhlenburg Rifles in battles from McDowell to Cedar Run, and then enlisted in Chew's Battery. Resides at Lovettsville, Loudoun county, Va. Ream, David M.—Wounded at Manassas, August 28, 1862. Promoted to lieutenant and transferred to Imboden's Cavalry. Died at Culpeper since the war. Rinker, Jacob Z.—Transferred from Company C, 10th Virginia Infantry. Resides in Loudoun county, Va. Reynard, George—Transferred from Company C, 10th Virginia Infantry. Saum, Daniel T.—Detailed as teamster and surrendered near Farmville, April 6, 1865. Discharged from Point Lookout prison June 18, 1865. Resides at Saumsville, Va. Saum, Mahlon G.—Resides at Hagerstown, Md. Sager, Joseph G.—Same as next below. Sager, John T.-Surrendered May 12, 1864, at Spotsylvania and in p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Warren Blues—Extra Billy's men: Roll of officers and men of a famous band of Veterans. (search)
ivate (living). Martin, George S., corporal; the only man out of seventeen who came out safe at Cold Harbor, June 3, 1864 (living). Mathews, James M., private, wounded at Seven Pines, badly (dead). Mathews, Robert, private, wounded desperately, May 6, 1864 (dead). Maddox, James. McFarland, William A., sergeant, wounded and captured June 3, 1864 (living). McFarland, Robert M., private, wounded at Spotsylvania (dead). Pomeroy, Thomas M., private, killed at Spotsylvania. Rinker, John W., private, wounded June 3, 1864, and died. Ridenour, John W., private, wounded and captured (dead). Ridgeway, William H., private, killed at Spotsylvania. Robertson, Daniel, private, wounded and never returned. Rudacelle, Isaac, private, wounded June 3, 1864, captured (living). Rudacelle, George W., private, killed at Gettysburg. Rudacelle, John W., private, went to the cavalry after the Rudasill, Philip, private, went to the cavalry. Santmyers, John B., priva
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.64 (search)
nis, J., Mountz, J. D., Md.; Markwood, George, Magalis, William, Michael, J., McKaig, John, Md.; Moore, Sam, Miller, Simon, Moupin, Lincoln, Mace, John, Mason, J. H., Miller, Charles, Martin, William, Miller, Rader, Miller, James, Mills, Reuben, Miles, William, Michael, Isaac, Neville, Thornton, Norris, William, O'Haver, Martin, Overman, John, O'Rouke, John, Parker, Joseph A., Poole, William, Painter, N. B., Pennybacker, J. E., Pennybacker, Isaac, Reed, John, Ritter, Henry, Richardson, John, Rinker, William, Rogers, John, Rhodes, O. L., Richards, B. F., Robinson, I. N., Rosser, Robert, Shaffer, Sam, Smith, John, Showalter, John, Senman, William, Stewart, F., Md.; Seymour, Henry, Seymour, William, Stickley, S., Steele, John, Showalter, D. H., Shipman, J., Saunders, James, Scott, F., Shoemate, William, Shryock, J., Spaulding, William, Shore, H. W., Shitagger, William, Temple, J. M., Tabb, Harlan, Tabb, P., Trumbo, M. G., Tucker, E., Tucker, Sam, Truehart, H. M., Tex.; Triplett, John, Tri
f the 18th inst, in the neighborhood of Taylor's Furnace, about 12 miles north of Newtown, Frederick county, in which Capt. Rinker, a gallant officer of the 12th Virginia cavalry, was killed. Hearing that a bend of Yankees were depredating in that locality and arresting loyal citizens, Capt, Rinker started in pursuit, accompanied by Lieut.-Col. Punk, who was in quest of conscripts. At daylight on the morning of the 18th they came upon the enemy, and attempted to dislodge them from a house and barn. In the effort Col. Funk, Capt. Rinker, and five men, were cut off from the others of the party. The skirmish lasted nearly a half hour, during which Capt. Rinker fell. Col. Funk exhibited that coolness which has distinguished him on former Capt. Rinker fell. Col. Funk exhibited that coolness which has distinguished him on former occasions as an officer of the "Stonewall Brigade."The party succeeded in capturing four traitors.--Our loss was two killed and one wounded, and four horses. The enemy had eleven killed and wounded, after which they fell back to Winchester. It