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John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 72 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 42 4 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 10 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 6 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 5 1 Browse Search
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delegates: Rev. Dr. Kirkland and Dr. Ware, Cambridge; Dr. Holmes, Cambridge; Dr. Lowell, Boston; Rev. Aaron Greene, Malden; Rev. Henry Ware, Boston; Rev. James Walker, Charlestown; Rev. Convers Francis, Watertown; Rev. Joseph Field, Weston; Rev. George Ripley, Boston; Rev. Samuel Ripley, Waltham; Dr. Fiske, West Cambridge; Rev. Charles Brooks, Hingham; Rev. Francis Parkman, Boston; Dr. Foster, Brighton; Rev. Thomas B. Gannett, Cambridgeport; Rev. Bernard Whitman, Waltham; Rev. Charles Briggs, Letion. The services were assigned as follows: Introductory prayer and reading of the Scriptures, by Rev. Charles Briggs; sermon, by Rev. Convers Francis; ordaining prayer, by Dr. Lowell; charge, by Dr. Kirkland; right hand of fellowship, by Rev. George Ripley; address to the people, by Rev. Henry Ware, jun.; concluding prayer, by Rev. B. Whitman; benediction, by the pastor. Copies of the within exercises were requested for publication, but were declined. March 14, 1827: In the church, vo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ripley, George 1802-1880 (search)
Ripley, George 1802-1880 Editor; born in Greenfield, Mass., Oct. 3, 1802; was an able writer and a most industrious man of letters, having edited, translated, and written numerous works on a great variety of subjects, and gained a wide reputation as a scholar, editor, and journalist. He graduated at Harvard University in 182lists; and with Charles A. Dana, Parke Godwin, and J. S. Dwight, of the Harbinger, an advocate of socialism as propounded by Fourier. From 1849 until his death Mr. Ripley was the literary editor of the New York Tribune. In conjunction with Charles A. Dana, Dr. Ripley edited Appleton's New American Cyclopaedia (16 volumes, 1857-6Harbinger, an advocate of socialism as propounded by Fourier. From 1849 until his death Mr. Ripley was the literary editor of the New York Tribune. In conjunction with Charles A. Dana, Dr. Ripley edited Appleton's New American Cyclopaedia (16 volumes, 1857-63), and a new edition (1873-76). He died in New York City, July 4, 1880.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 2: old Cambridge in three literary epochs (search)
atter writing, Your periodical plan charms me. In the autumn of 1836, the bicentennial of Harvard University was held, and four young clergymen — Emerson, Hedge, Ripley, and Putnam-had an almost casual meeting at Willard's Hotel, now the electric railway station at Harvard Square in Cambridge; where began a series of consultation to represent; but Alcott writes of its prospects in his diary (November I, 1839): Half a dozen men exhaust our list of contributors; Emerson, Hedge, Miss Fuller, Ripley, [W. H.] Channing, Dwight, [J. F.] Clarke, are our dependence. It is to be noticed that, of this club of seven, Hedge and Miss Fuller were Cambridge born; Emersor. Hildreth (very much interested in the undertaking), Thos. W. Parsons, author of an excellent translation of Dante, Parke Godwin of the New York Evening Post, Mr. Ripley of the Tribune, Dr. Elder of Phila, H. D. Thoreau of Concord, Theodore Parker (my most valued friend), Edmund Quincy, James R. Lowell (from whom I have a most e
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Index (search)
E. J., 195. Phillips, M. D., 68. Phillips, Wendell, 104, 179. Phillips, Willard, 44. Pierce, Pres., Franklin, 113. Poe, E. A., 137, 144, 173. Pope, Alexander, 90, 91. Popkin, Dr. J. S., 23. Potter, Barrett, 119. Pratt, Dexter, 126. Pratt, Rowena, 126. Putnam, Rev., George, 54, Putnam, Mrs. S. R., 16. Puttenham, George, 159. Quincy, Edmund, 67, 104. Quincy, Pres., Josiah, 29, 43, 157. Read, Gen., Meredith, 132. Richter, J. P. F., 85, 116. Riedesel, Baroness, 149, 150. Ripley, George, 48, 54,57, 67, 113. Rossetti, D. G., 132. Rousseau, J. J., 191. Ruggles, Mrs., 151. Ruggles, Capt., George, 150. Russell, Miss P., 75. Sackville, Lord, 195. Sales, Francis, 17, 23. Sanborn, F. B., 156, 174, 177. Scott, Sir, Walter, 26, 35, 177. Scott, Sir, William, 45. Scudder, H. E., 69, 70. Sewall, Samuel, 12. Sewell, Jonathan, 12. Seward, W. H., 178. Shaler, Prof. N. S., 70. Shepard, Rev., Thomas, 3, 5, 7. Sidney, Sir, Philip, 159. Smalley, G. A., 192. Smith, Sydn
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 2: education (search)
ou would like to know something certain about Spinoza, I send you Mr. Ripley's last pamphlet which is devoted to the examination of his systeml lose these lectures. Of new books I hear nothing. The next in Mr. Ripley's series of foreign literature are expected to be Neander's Churcting, and a volume of poems from Uhland and Korner. Apropos of Mr. Ripley, he leaves his church on the 1st of January as I am informed. He his studies, he decided to join the Brook Farm Association which Dr. Ripley was just getting fairly under way. Foreseeing that the complet be straitened for money, he had addressed a letter of inquiry to Dr. Ripley from Buffalo, in July, asking the terms under which he might be pal scope and purpose to justify specific inquiries. To this letter Ripley replied from Brook Farm, August 4, 1841, as follows: I am trulyitely known, but from the letter quoted above, it is evident that Dr. Ripley regarded him as a desirable acquisition, and therefore forced the
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 3: community life (search)
he independence and unselfishness of Channing, Ripley, and the new school of thinkers, he was by no aise of the able and unselfish management of Dr. Ripley. He lent his name and such credit as he hadred dollars each, of which Dana took three and Ripley three; the rest, in all twenty-four shares, we We received on Wednesday a letter from Mr. Ripley. He puts the price of board at three dollare interesting brothers, for on March 18, 1842, Ripley wrote to Dana, who had evidently gone to New Ys, as before stated, was assumed and paid by Dr. Ripley, and in this manner the business honor of al work at the school, and no one, not excepting Ripley, spoke more fervidly than Dana in the cause ofnces, are all candidly and gracefully told. Mr. Ripley is mentioned with respect and cordiality. Wring the trip to New York, already alluded to, Ripley wrote, April 10, 1842, as follows: The bning in June, 1845. It was edited mainly by Dr. Ripley; but in this as in everything else Dana seem[7 more...]
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 9: Dana's influence in the tribune (search)
rd, Collamer, Chase, Fessenden, Hale, Sunnier, Henry Wilson, and all the other rising men of the Republican party. A warm and devoted friendship grew up between them, with Dana as well as with Greeley. The paper was their chief support, as well as their chief means of reaching their constituents through a friendly interpretation. Under Dana's special guidance it had also come to be the leading literary journal of the country. Its columns were filled with criticisms of the latest books by Ripley, Hildreth, George William Curtis, and other rising men, and this made it welcome to the preachers, school-masters, and professional men throughout the North. Thus the advanced thought of the day on every subject was widely disseminated. On the other hand, the leading Southern men, and the leading Democrats from both sections, were kept under constant observation and criticism. Such men as Davis, Toombs, Benjamin, Hammond, Chesnut, Hunter, Mason, Slidell, Douglas, and Breckenridge were k
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 10: last days with the tribune (search)
properly be said that Dana was already fully employed as managing editor of the Tribune, and, as has been shown, he was also devoted heart and soul to the war against the spread of slavery; but he did not hesitate to take on this new task. With Ripley to give personal attention to the editorial and administrative bureau, he grappled with the work, and by giving to it all the time he could spare from the Tribune, from his family, and from rest, he did his full share to the satisfaction of his a came and reported it was true, and that H. G. was immovable. On Friday, March 28th, I resigned, and the trustees at once accepted it, passing highly complimentary resolutions, and voting me six months salary after the date of my resignation. Mr. Ripley opposed the proceeding in the trustees, and above all insisted on delay, in order that the facts might be ascertained; but all in vain. On Saturday, March 29th, Mr. Greeley came down, called another meeting of the trustees, said he had never
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 26: Grant's second term (search)
ence of everything like assumption or servility, the amusements, the discussions, the friendships, the ideal and poetical atmosphere which gave a charm to life, all these combine to create a picture towards which the mind turns back with pleasure as to something distant and beautiful, not elsewhere met with amid the routine of this world. In due time it ended and became almost forgotten; and yet it remains alive, and the purposes that inspired it still dwell in many minds. In the case of Mr. Ripley, they remained as the soul of his philosophy, the sure and steady light which lighted up the dark places of thought and action. He was a socialist and a democrat to the last. The same is doubtless true of others who were with him, and who have since been scattered in the ordinary plains and byways of existence. The faith of democracy, the faith of humanity, the faith of mankind are steadily growing towards a society not of antagonisms, but of concord; not of artificial distinctions,
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Appendix: Brook Farm — an address delivered at the University of Michigan on Thursday, January 21, 1895: (search)
country the doctrine of this Transcendental school. Mr. George Ripley, a Unitarian minister in Boston, was another advocate Transcendental party that I have been speaking of, with Mr. Ripley and his associates, he emphatically declined. The Trans must remain apart. It was in the spring of 1841 that Mr. Ripley and his friends determined to buy a farm of two hundred n the spring and took possession of their farm. Next to Mrs. Ripley and Mr. Ripley, the most distinguished person who went wMr. Ripley, the most distinguished person who went with them was Nathaniel Hawthorne. He had also adopted the idea that he would like to work out-doors. He had got tired of the majority of the members was not shaken. The faith of Mr. Ripley especially, a philosopher of the first order, was just ahat which it is convenient for them to do. For instance, Mr. Ripley, the head of the phalanx, was the chief of the cow-milkia morning newspaper. We all began anew very soon except Mr. Ripley. He remained and settled up the affairs. And when the
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