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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 5: Bennington and the Journal of the Times1828-29. (search)
rison was prompt to denounce and pillory the three New England representatives who were recreant to their duty, namely, Mr. Ripley of James W. Ripley. Jonathan Harvey. Rollin C. Mallary. Maine and Mr. Harvey of New Hampshire, who voted against thJames W. Ripley. Jonathan Harvey. Rollin C. Mallary. Maine and Mr. Harvey of New Hampshire, who voted against the consideration of the question, and Mr. Mallary of Vermont, who alone among the New England members opposed by his vote the resolution in favor of gradual emancipation in the District. The caustic comments of the Bennington editor on their action so stung Messrs. Ripley and Mallary that they addressed Jour. of the Times, Feb. 20, Mar. 6, 1829. personal letters to him in explanation and defence of it; but he declined to accept their excuses as valid, and branded Ripley and Harvey as NortheRipley and Harvey as Northern dough-faces. Other New England newspapers echoed his indignant protest. The report of the Committee to whom the resolutions were referred was presented on the 29th of January, Ibid., Mar. 6, 1829. and betrayed at once the determination of t
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 9: organization: New-England Anti-slavery Society.—Thoughts on colonization.—1832. (search)
vere privations, and to brutish ignorance! Have these no claims upon the sympathies—prayers—charities—exertions of our white countrywomen?. . . When woman's heart is bleeding, Shall woman's voice be hushed? The most important extraneous feature of the second volume of the Liberator was the republication of Letters Lib. 2.133-[181]. on American Slavery, addressed to Mr. Thomas Rankin, merchant at Middlebrook, Augusta Co., Va., by John Rankin, Pastor of the Presbyterian Churches of Ripley and Strait Creek, Brown County, Ohio, of which the first edition was published at Ripley, in the latter State, in 1826. The letters themselves appear to have been written in 1824, when their author was about 31 years of age. Following the reprint in the Liberator, an edition in book form was put forth by Garrison & Knapp in 1833, and a fifth edition was published by Isaac Knapp as late as 1838. Still another edition bears the imprint of Charles Whipple, Newburyport, 1836. Mr. Garrison pr<