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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 7: Atlantic coast defenses.-assigned to duty in Richmond as commander in chief under the direction of the Southern President. (search)
ing the war employed to secure their capture. Their safety for so long a period from impending dangers upon every side was due to the military skill of Lee, as well as to the efforts of the accomplished officers who were in immediate command-General Ripley at Charleston and General Lawton at Savannah. Well might a prophetic tongue utter at this period that the time would come when Lee's superior abilities would be vindicated, both to his own renown and the glory of his country. On February f the army. He determined to carry out Johnston's plans and continue the attack on the next day, and so informed General Lee, asking for all the assistance he could give him. In a note dated Richmond, June 1st, 5 A. M., General Lee replies: Ripley will be ordered, and such forces from General Holmes as can be got up will be sent; your determination to strike the enemy is right. Try and ascertain his position and how best he can be hit. It will be a glorious thing if you can gain a complet
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 10: Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg. (search)
eneral J. R. Jones was obliged to leave the field, and the brave General Starke (as General Lee called him), who succeeded him, was killed. General Lawton was wounded, and was succeeded by Early, who had been supporting the cavalry and horse artillery in defending a most important hill, which if occupied by the enemy would have commanded and enfiladed Jackson's position, and who got in with his brigade, as he usually did, at the proper moment. Hood and Early, re-enforced by the brigades of Ripley, Colquitt, and Garland, under Colonel McRae, of Hill's division, and D. R. Jones, under Colonel G. T. Anderson, now took up the fighting; the Federals were again driven back, and again brought up fresh troops. General McLaws arrived just in time to meet them; General Walker brought from the right, together with Early's division, drove the Federals back in confusion, beyond the position occupied at the beginning of the engagement. The long lines of blue which first recoiled from the wall
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
River, 14. Reed, General, Theodore, killed, 384. Reno, General, 205; killed, 207. Reynolds, General, mentioned, 118, 119, 127, 186, 190, 192, 226, 227, 247, 270; killed at Gettysburg, 272. Rice Station, battle of, 384. Richard Coeur de Lion, 2. Richelieu, Cardinal, 65. Richmond, the race for, 333; Petersburg and Richmond lines abandoned, 379; occupied by United States troops, 381; evacuated, 381. Ricketts, General, mentioned, 190, 192. Ringgold Barracks, 61, 62. Ripley, General, 130. Robertson, General, Beverley, 184, 187, 285. Rockbridge Artillery, 323. Rodes, General, 249-252. Rosecrans, General William S., 115, 127, 122, 123, 119. Rosser's cavalry brigade, 353, 384, 371. Round Top, 282. Russell's division, 318, 319. Rust, Colonel, Albert, 119, 120, 121. Sanders, General, killed, 363. Sanford, General, Charles, 105. Santa Anna, General, 31, 32, 38. San Jacinto, battle of, 31. Schenck, General, mentioned, 143. Schofield, General