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John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 72 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 42 4 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 10 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 6 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for George Ripley or search for George Ripley in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 10: Thoreau (search)
een below with a border of blue, with reference to the two elements in which it was to spend its existence. During his Walden retirement, Thoreau worked over the original record of his pleasant outing, expanding it greatly by the inclusion of very various material, and had it published at his own risk by Monroe in 1849. It was the year of the Argonauts, of the gold-rush to California, and such literary treasure as the odd book contained was not much regarded. Though favourably reviewed by Ripley and by Lowell, it did not please the public, and over seven hundred copies out of an impression of one thousand were thrown back on the author's hands. It is another of the paradoxes of Thoreau's career that since his death, this failure has been edited with almost benedictine care. Lowell's praise of A Week can hardly be termed excessive. After dwelling on its weak points, its lack of unity, its imitation of Emerson, its dolorous verse, he continues, the prose work is done conscien
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 22: divines and moralists, 1783-1860 (search)
ses Stuart and on the other with George Ripley. The common basis of his opposition to both is his opposition to Plato. Platonism, his researches led him to believe, had in its Neo-Platonic avatar at Alexandria produced, among other doctrines of emanation, the doctrine of the Trinity. Platonism also, believing the soul to have been in contact with ideal archetypes whose memory it retained in this life, was the very fountain of the doctrine of intuitions. Norton's opposition to Emerson and Ripley was thus of a piece with his opposition to Philo Judaeus and Moses Stuart, the opposition of an exact scholar to what he considered loose, effusive, and sentimental thinking. Indeed, though Norton never says so in so many words, he seems to have recognized the Platonism of the Transcendental movement, and to have condemned it upon the same grounds as those upon which he condemned Plato himself. Anti-Platonism is the key to Norton's position. Norton's teaching is praised by his disciple
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
he Maine, 331 Reminiscences of the Civil War, 318 Repetition and parallelism in English verse, 66 n. Repplier, Agnes, 172 Republican (Springfield), 190, 191 264 n. Requier, A. J., 306, 309 Resignation, 39 Reveille The (The Drum), 281 Rhetoric (Blair), 124 Rhode Island to the South, 286 Rhodes, J. F., 193 Richardson, Samuel, 340, 391 Richmond Enquirer, the, 183 Riley, James Whitcomb, 363, 409 Rill from the town Pump, a, 22 Rip Van Winkle, 368, 401 Ripley, George, 9, 166, 192, 197, 210, 211 Rise of the Dutch republic, 129, 136, 137, 138, 140, 141 Ritchie, Alexander H., 172 Ritchie, Thomas, 183, 184, 185 River fight, the, 282 Rives, J. C., 120 Rives, John P., 183 Roane, Judge, Spencer, 84-85 Robert of Lincoln, 241 Robertson, J. M., 63 n., 66 n., 67 n. Robertson, William, 129 Robinson Crusoe, 12, 401 n. Robin Hood, 408 Roderick Hudson, 375 Rollo books, 400 Romance of certain old Clothes, 375 Rome, T. H., 264 n.