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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 226 72 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 134 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 50 10 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 26 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 15 3 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 14 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 2 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 12 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for R. S. Ripley or search for R. S. Ripley in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 9: operations of Admiral Dupont's squadron in the sounds of South Carolina. (search)
they would abandon them, and erect new works again at some other point. A remarkable instance of patriotism on the part of the colored people was evinced in the bringing out of the armed steamer Planter from Charleston, and delivering her over to the naval officer blockading that port. Robert Small, who performed this courageous act, was employed on board the Planter, which was used as a dispatch and transportation steamer attached to the Engineer Department in Charleston, under Brigadier-General Ripley. The taking out of the Planter would have done credit to anyone, but the cleverness with which the whole affair was conducted deserves more than a passing notice. Small was a very clever light mulatto who had been running this steamer for some time, and he had gained the confidence of his employers to that extent that, on the 13th of May, the Captain went on shore for the night and left Small in charge. He had made all his arrangements to carry off his family, and at 4 o'clock
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
to the Navy Department. difficulties encountered by the monitors. misrepresentations of the attack on Charleston. General Ripley's instructions for repelling the federal attack on Charleston. correspondence between President Lincoln and Admiral hich these vessels were to be exposed, it is necessary to consider some statements in the circular of the Confederate General Ripley. He mentions three circles of fire which had been prepared for the reception of the fleet. He meant that there were command. To show the Confederate determination to hold Charleston at all hazards, we here insert tile circular of General Ripley. It shows that the Confederates were alive to everything necessary to circumvent an enemy. Circular.Headquartuty of the coming defence. With careful attention, coolness and skillful gunnery, success is far more than possible. R. S. Ripley, Brigadier-General Commanding. Official: Wm. F. Nanee, Acting-Assistant Adjutant-General. Commander (now Rear-Admi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
eld-officers of the Federal army. prisoners, have been ordered to be confined in Charleston. These officers have been placed in my charge, and will be provided with commodious quarters in a part of the city occupied by non-combatants, the majority of whom are women and children. It is proper that you should know, however, that the portion of the city in which they are located is, and has been for some time. exposed day and night to the fire of your guns. Very respectfully, etc., R. S. Ripley, Brigadier-General Commanding. General Schimmelfennig, Commanding United States Forces, Morris and Folly Islands, etc. There is much to be said against exercising this kind of warfare; and exposing the lives of prisoners in a place to prevent an enemy from firing upon it, can only be considered a violation of the usages of civilized warfare which would damage any cause. The shelling of a beleagured city is a right of war, and though the duties of humanity towards women and childre
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
firmed in a general way the existence and locality of the obstructions; but their opportunities for observation were seldom as good as our own, for none but those engaged in the work were allowed opportunities of knowing more than could be seen from a short distance, and the rebels were singularly fortunate in the precautions to keep their own counsel as to the nature of the submerged defences. The general existence of obstructions at an early date was set forth in a circular order of General Ripley (December 26, 1862, regarding the defence to be made against our attack. In speaking of these impediments it says: The obstructions will also be designated, and under no circumstances will the enemy be permitted to reconnoitre them. Besides the obstructions at the entrance, the middle channel was closed by a double row of piles extending some distance across the harbor, which were distinctly visible when the first operations were initiated against Charleston. In the Hog Island C