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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Manassas to Seven Pines. (search)
divisions of Jackson and Ewell. My authority for the 15,000 was General Holmes's statement, May 31st, that he had that number waiting the President's order to join me. When their arrival was announced, I supposed the number was as stated. General Ripley, their best-informed and senior officer, was my authority for the 22,000 from South Carolina and Georgia. I thought, as a matter of course, that all of these troops had been brought up for the great crisis. Mr. Davis is eager to prove that s of them came to Richmond in time. One who, like me, had opportunity to observe that Mr. Davis was almost invariably too late in reinforcing threatened from unthreatened points, has no apology for the assumption that this was an exception. General Ripley reported officially that he brought 5000 from Charleston, and explained in writing that, arriving before them, he was assigned to the command of the brigade of 2366, his 5000 being distributed as they arrived in detachments. General Lawton s
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
n (w), Lieut.-Col. Franklin J. Faison (k), Maj. William H. Toon; 23d N. C., Col. Daniel H. Christie (w), Lieut. I. J. Young (w); Ala. Battery (Jeff Davis Arty.), Capt. J. W. Bondurant. Brigade loss: k, 192; w, 637; m, 15 == 844. Fourth Brigade, Col. Alfred H. Colquitt: 13th Ala., Col. Birkett D. Fry; 6th Ga., Lieut.-Col. J. M. Newton; 23d Ga., Col. Emory F. Best; 27th Ga., Col. Levi B. Smith; 28th Ga., Col. T. J. Warthen. Brigade loss: k, 75; w, 474; in, 5 == 554. Fifth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Roswell S. Ripley: 44th Ga., Col. Robert A. Smith (m w), Capt. John W. Beck; 48th Ga., Col. William Gibson; 1st N. C., Col. M. S. Stokes (k), Capt. H. A. Brown, Lieut.-Col. William P. Bynum; 3d N. C., Col. Gaston Meares (k), Lieut.-Col. William L. De Rosset. Brigade loss: k, 171; w, 707; m, 30==908. Artillery: Va. Battery (Hanover Arty.), Capt. (G. W. Nelson. (See, also, Jones's Battalion in Reserve Artillery, temporarily attached to this division.) Magruder's command, Maj.-Gen. J. B. Magruder
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hanover Court House and Gaines's Mill. (search)
nderson, were part of the division of A. P. Hill, his other two divisions, Gregg and Branch, being held in reserve. The losses in their hopeless attack fell chiefly upon Archer, who made the first advance about 5 P. M., and later upon Pender and Ripley. Pegram's battery was badly cut up, losing forty-seven men and many horses. On the Union side, Martindale, Griffin, and Meade came up after the battle had begun, reinforcing Reynolds and Seymour. When firing ceased, about 9 P. M., Porter's trong's division of Jackson's corps), replacing Archer, Field, Anderson; M, N, 0, P, Jackson's old division, as follows: Fulkerson (3d Va.), Cunningham (2d Va.), Lawton, and Winder; Q, R, S, Seymour, Trimble, and Elzey; T, U, V, W, X, line at first: Ripley, Colquitt, Rodes, Anderson (G. B.), Garland. General directions of approach are indicated by dotted lines. Union batteries: 1, Allen; 2, 3, Weeden; 4, Martin; 5, 5, 5, 5, Edwards; 6, Weed; 7, Tidball; 8, Kingsbury; 9, Hexamer; 10, Upton; 11,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Lee's attacks north of the Chickahominy. (search)
furnished the division commanders were worthless. At a request from General W. D. Pender, who had been roughly handled in attacking works on the creek, Brigadier-General Ripley, of my division, was directed to cooperate with him, and the attack was made about dark. The enemy had intrenchments of great strength and development o artillery along the line of Beaver Dam, which was held by a thin line of skirmishers, the main force having retreated to Gaines's Charge of Confederates under Ripley and Pender at Beaver Dam Creek, just above Ellerson's Mill. Mill and New Cold Harbor. A. P. Hill's division was ordered to pursue on to the mill, and my divis favorite arm with General McClellan, and he had brought it to the highest point of efficiency. I do not know how much of our infantry straggled in the swamp. Ripley got lost, and his fine brigade was not in action at all. Of Colquitt's brigade, the 6th and 27th Georgia regiments were engaged; the other three regiments in comi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan's change of base and Malvern Hill. (search)
ed at Turkey Island Bridge the day before by Warren's brigade, with the aid of the gun-boats. The main fighting was in the space between the words Confederate and Union, together with one or two assaults upon the west side of the Crew Hill from the meadow. Morell's and Couch's divisions formed the first Union line, and General Porter's batteries extended from the Crew house to the West house. man. Rodes being sick, his brigade was commanded by that peerless soldier, Colonel J. B. Gordon. Ripley, Garland, and Colquitt also got over without serious loss. My five brigade commanders and myself now made an examination of the enemy's position. He was found to be strongly posted on a commanding hill, all the approaches to which could be swept by his artillery and were guarded by swarms of infantry, securely sheltered by fences, ditches, and ravines. Armistead was immediately on my right. We remained a long while awaiting orders, when I received the following: July 1st, 1862.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
on the hill . . . to sweep the approaches. . . . Rodes and Ripley came up soon after Anderson.--Editors. He made an effort t to a commanding knoll north of the pike or National road. Ripley was directed to attach himself to G. B. Anderson's left. road. D. H. Hill's two other brigades came up toward noon, Ripley being joined to G. B. Anderson, and Rodes being sent to ocs ordered. In half an hour or more I received a note from Ripley saying that he was progressing finely; so he was, to the r at the foot of the mountain,--on the west side,--when General Ripley said to me that we were entirely cut off from the restft. This was promptly reported through my adjutant to General Ripley, who directed me to withdraw to my original position, with the advantage all the while of three to one. When Ripley came up, as before described, the pressure was all at Fox'g. Rodes218204 Colquitt927 Garland100200 Anderson8429 Ripley00  494440 Longstreet's loss must have been less than
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
; in, 17 = 287. Artillery, Maj. L. M. Shumaker: Md. Battery (Baltimore Battery), Capt. J. B. Brocken-brough; Va. Battery (Alleghany Art'y), Capt. Joseph Carpenter; Va. Battery (Danville Art'y), Capt. George W. Wooding; Va. Battery (Hampden Art'y), Capt. William H. Caskie; Va. Battery, (Lee Battery), Capt. Charles I. Raine; Va. Battery (Rock-bridge Art'y), Capt. W. T. Poague. Artillery loss not separately reported. Hill's division, Maj.-Gen. Daniel H. Hill. Ripley's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Roswell S. Ripley (w), Col. George Doles: 4th Ga., Col. George Doles; 44th Ga., Capt. John C. Key; 1st N. C., Lieut.-Col. Hamilton A. Brown; 3d N. C., Col. William L. De Rosset (w). Brigade loss: South Mountain and Antietam, k, 110; w, 506; m, 124 = 740. Rodes's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. E. Rodes (w): 3d Ala., Col. C. A. Battle; 5th Ala., Maj. E. L. Hobson: 6th Ala., Col. J. B. Gordon (w), Lieut.-Col. J. N. Lightfoot (w): 12th Ala., Col. B. B. Gayle (k); 26th Ala., Col. E. A. O'Neal (w). Brigade loss:
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Antietam. (search)
about 1:30, according to Generals Williams and Greene.--Editors. But the fighting of Hooker's and Mansfield's men, though lacking unity of force and of purpose, had cost the enemy dear. J. R. Jones, who commanded Jackson's division, had been wounded; Starke, who succeeded Jones, was killed; Lawton, who followed Starke, was wounded. Ewell's division, commanded by Early, had suffered hardly less. Hood was sent back into the fight to relieve Lawton, and had been reenforced by the brigades of Ripley, Colquitt, and McRae (Garland's), from D. H. Hill's division. When Greene reached the Dunker Church, therefore, the Confederates on that wing had suffered more fearfully than our own men. Nearly half their numbers were killed and wounded, and Jackson's famous Stonewall division was so completely disorganized that only a handful of men under Colonels Grigsby and Stafford remained and attached themselves to Early's command. Of the division under Early, his own brigade was all that retained m
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.77 (search)
s of galloping horsemen and marching infantry, now seen, now lost in the smoke, adding weirdness to terror, all together make up a combination of sights and sounds wholly indescribable. Opposite the rear of Longstreet's position I overtook General Ripley, of D. H. Hill's division, who, after having had dressed a serious wound in the neck, was returning to the command of his brigade, then hotly engaged. From him I obtained some information of the progress of the battle in the center. Hurry0 A. M.) arrived from Harper's Ferry. By this time the Federals [under Sedgwick] had forced Hood's men out of the wood, and were in possession of the key of the battle-field. To regain this position and restore our line was now Brigadier-General Roswell S. Ripley, C. S. A. From a photograph. the task before us. This we soon accomplished, but only after perhaps the severest struggle of the day. The Federals contended for every foot of the ground, but, driven from rock to rock, from tree t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
the chief fruits of a victory, but, I beseech you, bend everything to push them while they are broken and hungry, weary and ill-supplied. Draw everything possible from Memphis to help move on Holly Springs, and let us concentrate. Appeal to the governors of the States to rush down some twenty or thirty new regiments to hold our rear, and we can make a triumph of our start. As it was, Grant telegraphed to Halleck at 9 A. M. the next day, October 8th: Rosecrans has followed rebels to Ripley. Troops from Bolivar will Quarters at Corinth occupied by the 52d Illinois Volunteers during the winter of 1862-3. from a War-time photograph. occupy Grand Junction to-morrow, with reinforcements rapidly sent on from the new levies. I can take everything on the Mississippi Central road. I ordered Rosecrans back last night, but he was so averse to returning that I have directed him to remain still until you can be heard from. Again on the same day, October 8th, Grant telegraphed
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