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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 58 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Adelaide Ristori or search for Adelaide Ristori in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: no. 19
Boylston place
: later Lyrics --1866; aet. 47 (search)
uary, 1867. It contained two articles by Mrs. Howe: the Salutation and a thoughtful poem called The two R's (Rachel and Ristori). Later, we find her in the Sittings of the Owl Club, making game of the studies she loved. This owl went to Germany. Brooks for sketches of travel. Saw and talked with Gilmour, who confuses my mind. October 29. Chev went with me to Ristori's debut, which was in Medea. November 3. All of these days have been busy and interrupted. Maggi Count Alberto Maggi, an Italian litterateur. has been reading Ristori's plays in my parlor every day this week and my presence has been compulsory. I have kept on with Fichte whose Sittenlehre I have nearly finished. Have copied one or two poems, written various letters in behalf of the magazine, have seen Ristori thrice on the stage and once in private. November 10. Finished copying and correcting my editorial for the first number of my weekly. Finished also Fichte's Sittenlehre for whose delightful re
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: a Roman winter--1878-1879; aet. 59-60 (search)
City. Our mother always loved acting. Her nearest approach to a professional appearance took place this winter. Madame Ristori was in Rome, and had promised to read at an entertainment in aid of some charity. She chose for her selection the scessed into the service, and how the last rehearsal was held while the musical part of the entertainment was going on. Madame Ristori made me repeat my part several times, insisting that my manner was too reserved and would make hers appear extravaganher wishes, and the reading was duly applauded. Reminiscences, p. 425. Another performance was arranged in which Madame Ristori gave the sleep-walking scene from MacBETHeth. The question arose as to who should take the part of the attendant. Why not your sister? said Ristori to Mrs. Terry. No one could do it better In the spring, the travellers made a short tour in southern Italy. One memory of it is given in the following verses:-- Near Amalfi Hurry, hurry, little town, With th
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 10: the last Roman winter 1897-1898; aet. 78 (search)
angulation of the Third Party some thirty years ago. March 26. Dined with Mrs. McCreary--the Duke of San Martino took me in to dinner-Monsignor Dennis O'Connell sat on the other side of me. I had an interesting talk with him. Mrs. McCreary sang my Battle Hymn. They begged me to recite The Flag, which I did. Mrs. Pearse, daughter of Mario and Grisi, sang delightfully. March 30. A fine luncheon party given by Mrs. Iddings, wife of the American Secretary of Embassy at the Grand Hotel. Mme. Ristori was there; I had some glimpses of reminiscence with her. I met her with La terribila Medea, which I so well remember hearing from her. I presently quoted her toast in La Locandiera, of which she repeated the last two lines. Maud had arranged to have Mrs. Hurlburt help me home. Contessa Spinola also offered, but I got off alone, came home in time to hear most of Professor Pansotti's lecture on the Gregorian music, which, though technical, was interesting. March 31. I woke up at one,
341. Richards, Laura E., I, 133, 148, 161, 166, 217, 222, 231, 265, 297, 339; II, 46, 57-59, 69, 84, 112, 119, 124, 146, 164, 195, 317, 318, 337, 340, 341, 358, 359-61, 412. Letters to, II, 58, 59, 63-68, 73, 81-83, 85, 88-91, 96, 98, 111-14, 122-25, 157, 198, 221, 223, 231, 236, 267, 277, 285, 298-300, 396. Richards, Elizabeth, II, 294, 341, 359. Richards, Rosalind, II, 179, 328, 354, 403. Richmond, I, 29, 213, 219, 274. Ridley, John, I, 315. Ripley, Lt., II, 155. Ristori, Adelaide, I, 254, 255; II, 32, 250. Ritterschloss, Marienburg, II, 14. Riverton, I, 319. Robert College, II, 42. Roberto, Father, II, 300, 337, 357. Robeson, Mary, II, 287. Robinson, Mr., II, 229. Robinson, Edwin A., II, 268. Rochambeau, Comte de, II, 381. Rochester, I, 377. Rodocanachi, Mr., I, 281; II, 129. Rogers, John, I, 271. Rogers, Samuel, I, 81, 84, 87. Rogers, W. A., I, 199; II, 49, 77. Rogers, Mrs. W. A., II, 49, 77. Rohr, Herr von, II, 17.