Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for W. C. Rives or search for W. C. Rives in all documents.

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into the separate depositories of the Government of the United States and the Governments of the individual States. That the Government of the United States is a Government, in as strict a sense of the term, as the Governments of the States; being, like them, organized into a legislative, executive, and judicial department, operating, like them, directly on persons and things, and having, like them, the command of a physical force for executing the powers committed to it. He writes Mr. Rives, in December, 1828: Were some of the Southern doctrines latterly advanced valid, our political system would not be a Government, but a mere league, in which the members have given up no part whatever of their sovereignty to a common Government, and retain, moreover, a right in each to dissolve the compact when it pleases. It seems to be forgotten, that in the case of a mere league there must be as much right on one side to assert and maintain its obligations as on the other to cancel it,
Doc. 53.-Virginia delegates to the Southern Congress. List of Delegates to represent the State in the Southern Congress, which meets at Richmond on the 21st July: 1. R. M. T. Hunter, of Essex. 2. John Tyler, of Charles City. 3. W. H. Macfarland, of Richmond City. 4. Roger A. Pryor, of Petersburg. 5. Thomas S. B. Cook, of Appomatox. 6. W. C. Rives, of Albemarle. 7. Robert E. Scott, of Fauquier. 8. James M. Mason, of Frederick. 9. John W. Brockenbaugh, of Brockenridge. 10. Charles W. Russell, of Wheeling. 11. Robert Johnson, of Harrison. 12. Walter Staples, of Montgomery. 13. Walter Preston, of Washington. State at Large — James A. Seddon, of Goochland; W. B. Preston, of Montgomery.--Baltimore American, June 27
Here, too, died in the discharge of his duty, Col. Ben. Brown, of Ray County, President of the Senate, a good man and true. Brig.-Gen. Slack's division suffered severely. He himself fell dangerously wounded at the head of his column. Of his regiment of infantry, under Col. John T. Hughes, consisting of about 650 men, 36 were killed, 76 wounded, many of them mortally, and 30 are missing. Among the killed were C. H. Bennet, adjutant of the regiment, Capt. Blackwell, and Lieut. Hughes. Col. Rives' squadron of cavalry, (dismounted,) numbering some 234 men, lost 4 killed and 8 wounded. Among the former were Lieut.-Col. Austin and Capt. Engart. Brig.-Gen. Clark was also wounded. His infantry (200 men) lost, in killed, 17, and wounded, 71. Col. Burbridge was severely wounded. Capts. Farris and Halleck, and Lieut. Haskins, were killed. Gen. Clark's cavalry, together with the Windsor Guards, were under the command of Lieut.-Col. Major, who did good service. They lost 6 killed and
Here, too, died in the discharge of his duty, Col. Ben. Brown, of Ray County, President of the Senate, a good man and true. Brig.-Gen. Slack's division suffered severely. He himself fell dangerously wounded at the head of his column. Of his regiment of infantry, under Col. John T. Hughes, consisting of about 650 men, 36 were killed, 76 wounded, many of them mortally, and 30 are missing. Among the killed were C. H. Bennet, adjutant of the regiment, Capt. Blackwell, and Lieut. Hughes. Col. Rives' squadron of cavalry, (dismounted,) numbering some 234 men, lost 4 killed and 8 wounded. Among the former were Lieut.-Col. Austin and Capt. Engart. Brig.-Gen. Clark was also wounded. His infantry (200 men) lost, in killed, 17, and wounded, 71. Col. Burbridge was severely wounded. Capts. Farris and Halleck, and Lieut. Haskins, were killed. Gen. Clark's cavalry, together with the Windsor Guards, were under the command of Lieut.-Col. Major, who did good service. They lost 6 killed and