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ect, no more in this District than in the State of South Carolina. After a long and spirited debate, mainly by Southern senators, Mr. Calhoun's motion to reject was defeated by a vote to receive the petition — Yeas 35, Nays 10, as follows: Yeas: Messrs. Benton, Brown, Buchanan, Clay, Clayton, Crittenden, Davis, Ewing of Illinois, Ewing of Ohio, Goldsborough, Grundy, Hendricks, Hill, Hubbard, Kent, King of Alabama, King of Georgia, Knight, Linn, McKean, Morris, Naudain, Niles, Prentiss, Robbins, Robinson, Ruggles, Shepley, Southard, Swift, Tallmadge, Tipton, Tomlinson, Wall, Webster, Wright. Nays: Messrs. Black, Calhoun, Cuthbert, Leigh, Moore, Nicholas, Porter, Preston, Walker, White. In the House, February 5, 1836. Mr. Henry L. Pinckney, of South Carolina, submitted the following resolve: Resolved, That all the memorials which have been offered, or may hereafter be presented to this House, praying for the abolition of Slavery in the District of Columbia, and also the
orps; casualties, 6 killed, 31 wounded, and 12 missing. In September, 1863, the regiment accompanied its Corps to Tennessee, where it fought at Missionary Ridge. In April, 1864, the Eleventh was transferred to Hooker's newly organized Twentieth Corps, a corps which won honorable distinction in the Atlanta campaign. During that campaign the regiment — then in Butterfield's (3d) Division — participated in some hard fighting at Resaca, where it lost 18 killed--including Colonel Gambee and Major Robbins--72 wounded, and one missing; its casualties on that campaign were over 200, or fifty per cent. of its effective strength. After marching with Sherman to the sea, it was hotly engaged in more hard fighting at Averasboro and Bentonville, N. C. Sixty-Fifth Ohio Infantry. Harker's Brigade — Newton's Division--Fourth Corps. (1) Col. Charles G. Harker, W. P., R. A.; Brig.-Gen. (Killed) (2) Col. Orlow Smith; Bvt. Brig.-Gen. companies. killed and died of wounds. died of d
rowing himself in front of the enemy and awaited his approach. In the mean time, he had been joined by the home-guards of King and Queen County, and a few men of Robbins's battalion. A little before eleven o'clock at night the enemy approached on the road in which they were posted. A fire was at once opened upon them, but their mond Dispatch, March 5, 1864. Lieutenant Pollard, commanding company H, of the Ninth Virginia regiment, aided by some home-guards and a few men from Lieutenant-Colonel Robbins's command, succeeded in penning Colonel Dahlgren on Wednesday night, about eleven o'clock. Dahlgren made a determined effort to force his way out, and wn derived from a trustworthy source it appears that the credit of the capture of the Dahlgren party is mainly due to Captain William M. Magruder and a squadron of Robbins's battalion under his command, who have for some time past been posted in King and Queen County as a corps of observation. Learning that the enemy was moving dow
Hosmer, 1746; Hunt, 1751. Kendall, 1752; Kettle, or Kettell, 1740. Lathe, Laithe, and Leathe, 1738; Learned, 1793; Le Bosquet, 1781. Mack, 1790; Mallard, 1753; Mansfield, 1759; May, 1759; MacCarthy, 1747; MacClinton, 1750; Mead, 1757; Melendy, 1732; Morrill, 1732. Newell, 1767; Newhall, 1751; Nutting, 1729. Oakes, 1721-75. Page, 1747; Pain, 1767; Parker, 1754; Penhallow, 1767; Polly, 1748; Poole, 1732; Powers, 1797; Pratt, 1791. Rand, 1789; Reed, 1755; Richardson, 1796; Robbins, 1765; Rouse, 1770; Rumril, 1750; Rushby, 1735; Russul, 1733. Sables, 1758; Sargent, 1716; Scolly, 1733; Semer, 1719; Simonds, 1773; Souther, 1747; Sprague, 1763; Stocker, 1763; Storer, 1748. Tebodo, 1757; Teel, 1760; Tidd, 1746; Tilton, 1764; Tompson, 1718; Trowbridge, 1787; Turner, 1729; Tuttle, 1729; Tyzick, 1785. Wait, 1725; Waite, 1785; Wakefield, 1751; Walker, 1779; Ward, 1718; Waters, 1721; Watson, 1729; White, 1749; Whitney, 1768; William, 1762; Williston, 1769; Winship, 1
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Part taken by the Ninth Virginia cavalry in Repelling the Dahlgren raid. (search)
halted for breakfast, then marched to Tunstall's Station, to which point Colonel Johnson moved to ambush. We saw only the half extinct fires of the Yankee camp and evidences of ruin to the helpless families near the road, and after a bootless chase, returned in the evening to bivouac at the intersection of the New Castle and New Kent roads, one mile from Old Church, to await the return of a courier sent to General Hampton in the morning. Whilst seated around our camp-fire, a courier--Private Robbins, of New Kent — rode in, and asked for Colonel Beale. He bore a dispatch from Lieutenant James Pollard, of Company H, who was absent from camp when we marched, and a package of papers. From the dispatch we learned that Pollard, hearing of a party of the enemy in the county, hastily collected twelve of his men, and crossing the Mattaponi, took position on the south bank at Dunkirk to dispute their passage over the bridge. After waiting some time, he learned the enemy had found a boat a
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Colorado Volunteers. (search)
Colorado Volunteers. 1st Colorado Regiment Cavalry Regiment organized from 1st Colorado Infantry November 1, 1862. Attached to District of Colorado, District of the Upper Arkansas and District of the Plains till November, 1865, operating against Indians and protecting stage routes. Stationed by detachments at Denver, Camps Collins, Curtis, Fillmore, Robbins, Weld and Canon City and at Forts Lyon and Garland. Service. Skirmish at Grand Pass, Fort Halleck, Idaho, July 7, 1863 (Detachment). Expedition from Denver to Republican River, Kansas, April 8-23, 1864 (Co. D ). Skirmish near Fremont Orchard, Colo., April 12 (Cos. C and H ). Expedition from Camp Sanborn to Beaver Creek, Kansas, April 14-18 (Cos. C and H ). Skirmish at Big Bushes, Smoky Hills, April 16 (Cos. C and H ). Skirmish at Cedar Bluff, Colo., May 3 (Co. C ). Scout from American Ranch to Cedar Bluff May 9-10. Scout from Fort Sumner August 3-November 4 (Cos. A, B and G ). Scout f
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
the Ticknors now, and feel that our separation is growing broader every day. I have been true to them. Why, then, should I feel troubled? And yet friendship, sympathy, and kindness are a peculiar necessity of my nature, and I can have few losses greater than the weakening of these bonds. Sunday, May 15. Another night of sleep. I am a day older, with gray hairs shooting forth with startling growth. We dined at Prescott's at five o'clock,—William and Charles Amory, W. H. Gardiner, Dr. Robbins, and myself. There was a good deal of pleasant conversation. Mr. Webster arrived in town yesterday. I wish to see him about Fay, and to revive the old plan about Greene; but our public men are so lost in selfishness that I do not hope much. If I were a partisan in politics, I should speak as one having influence. We Hillard and himself. have read the proofs of Dr. Channing's second pamphlet. It is bold, vivid, and full of life-giving truths. I admire the power of this man. O
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Sunday, May 15. (search)
Sunday, May 15. Another night of sleep. I am a day older, with gray hairs shooting forth with startling growth. We dined at Prescott's at five o'clock,—William and Charles Amory, W. H. Gardiner, Dr. Robbins, and myself. There was a good deal of pleasant conversation. Mr. Webster arrived in town yesterday. I wish to see him about Fay, and to revive the old plan about Greene; but our public men are so lost in selfishness that I do not hope much. If I were a partisan in politics, I should speak as one having influence. We Hillard and himself. have read the proofs of Dr. Channing's second pamphlet. It is bold, vivid, and full of life-giving truths. I admire the power of this man. Of all moral truth he has an instinctive perception, and clothes it in an angelic light. . . . So I close this rambling scrawl. What care you for these minutes and fragments of life here in Boston? You now look upon the Rhine and its castled glories. God bless you! my dear friend. Get
M. Hardwick and Maj. C. B. St. John were efficient until wounded. (411) Major Bane, of Fourth Texas, refers to the gallant Colonel Sheffield, of the Forty-eighth Alabama. No. 51—(18) Assignment as above, September 19 and 20, 1863, Bragg's army; Lieut.-Col. William M. Hardwick commanding regiment. No. 54—(228-231) Colonel Sheffield's report of the engagement near Lookout Creek, October 28th. Captain Eubanks mortally wounded, and 3 privates. Thanks Lieut. Joseph B. Hardwick and Sergeant-Major Robbins. (452) November 30, 1863, with troops in East Tennessee, commanded by General Longstreet. No. 67—(1022) Assignment as above, May, 1864, in Field's division, Lee's army of Northern Virginia. (1060) Partial return of casualties, 11 killed, 30 wounded, May 4, 1864. No. 80—(763) Casualties, June 13 to July 31, 1864, 1 killed, 4 wounded. No. 87—(877) Partial return of casualties, August 1 to December 31, 1864, 8 killed, 20 wounded. No. 88—(159) Law's b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Wee Nee Volunteers of Williamsburg District, South Carolina, in the First (Gregg's) Regiment—Siege and capture of Fort Sumter. (search)
rom him, Stand, rounds, advance Sergeant and give the copper sign. The Sergeant advanced, gave the countersign, and the laugh at the expense of N—— F——firmly impressed on his mind the difference between the countersign and copper sign. Once, Robbins F——was the sentinel at the guard room. The Captain instructed him that when he saw the officer of the day approaching, he must call out, officer of the day, turn out the guard, and that the officer of the guard would then form his guard for inspection. The Captain, who was himself the officer of the day on that occasion, after a brief interval, approached to see whether his instructions were remembered. Imagine his surprise to hear Robbins call out, officer of the day, stand out of the way. Fort Sumter was closely watched by the sentinels, and every movement that could be tortured into a signal promptly reported to headquarters. The sentinels were particularly directed to look out for signal rockets. One night a brave fel
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