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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
e of them. The first report of the capture was made to Major Robert Burns, Assistant Adjutant General of General R. H. G. Minty's staff. I drew the report, immediately after our return to Macon, for Captain John C. Hathaway, commanding the regiment while Colonel Pritchard was absent in charge of the prisoners on the way to Washington. I made a full written statement of the facts for General Wilson, at the request of Major Van Antwerp, his aide-de-camp, and another statement to General John Robertson, Adjutant General of Michigan. The facts are beyond dispute respecting the female disguise. I know all about it, because I saw it, and, assisted by Corporal Munger, and others present, arrested Jefferson Davis when he was in such female disguise. Mr. Reagan did not then see him; but there were several Confederate officers present who did see the arrest, and made no effort to aid their chief. The facts concerning the capture and the disguise are well remembered by those present,
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 8: attitude of the Border Slave-labor States, and of the Free-labor States. (search)
mmission to represent to the President that, in the judgment of the General Assembly of Virginia, any additional display of military power in the North will jeopardize the tranquillity of the Republic; and that the evacuation of Fort Sumter Is the first step that should be taken to restore harmony and peace. For the purpose of procuring abstinence from hostile action, pending the proceedings of the proposed Peace Congress, ex-President John Tyler was sent to President Buchanan, and Judge John Robertson to Governor Pickens, and the Governors of other seceding States. The President informed Mr. Tyler that he had no power to make such agreement; and the Legislature of South Carolina said haughtily, by resolution, The separation of this State from the Federal Union is final, and we have no further interest in the Constitution of the United States. The only appropriate negotiations between South Carolina and the Federal Government are as to their mutual relations as foreign States. C
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
nations; yet the uncertainty served to render the whole question still more complicated. The two charter claimants, Virginia and North Carolina, were the only States who supported their titles by actual settlement, and by civil and military occupation. The settlements along the Mississippi, the Wabash and the Ohio, and in Kentucky, and the military occupation by George Rogers Clarke, on the part of Virginia; and the settlements along the Watauga and the Cumberland, and the operations of Robertson and Sevier on the part of North Carolina, supported and maintained the charter rights of all the claimants to the western lands. The cabin and the rifle of the pioneer guarded the charters of the States, and enabled our commissioners in negotiating the treaty of peace to add to the abstract charter titles the plea of possession, and thus to prevent the limitation of the boundaries to the Alleghany mountains or the Ohio river. (Roosevelt's Winning of the West, Vol. 2., p. 373; Vol. 3, p.
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
agree upon some suitable adjustment of the existing unhappy controversies in the spirit in which the Constitution was originally formed. As evidence of its earnestness the legislature appointed from among its most eminent and conservative citizens ex-President John Tyler, William C. Rives, Judge Brocken-brough, George W. Summers, and James A. Seddon to act as commissioners; and in addition selected exPresi-dent Tyler as special commissioner to the President of the United States, and Judge John Robertson to the seceded States. The resolutions were promptly laid before Congress by President Buchanan, accompanied by a message of cordial approval in which he advised Congress to abstain from passing any law calculated to produce a collision of arms pending the contemplated proceedings. But the discussions in Congress were not peace preservative. Mr. Mason expressed his pride in the honorable office which his State had undertaken, but he warned the Senate that collisions of arms would e
ejection. On the 19th the general assembly invited the other States of the Union to meet it in a peace conference, at Washington, that should endeavor to heal the dissensions then prevailing, and appointed ex-President John Tyler, Hons. William C. Rives, John W. Brockenbrough, George W. Summers, and James A. Seddon, some of its most distinguished citizens, as delegates to that conference. It also appointed ex-President Tyler a commissioner to the President of the United States, and Judge John Robertson a commissioner to the States that had seceded, to request each of these to abstain from acts likely to bring on a collision of arms pending Virginia's efforts to secure peace. On February 4th this peace conference met in Washington, D. C., with representatives present from thirteen of the free States and seven of the border slave States. On the same day the Southern slave States, with the exception of the seven border States that had not seceded, met in convention at Montgomery Ala.
action of the General Assembly of Virginia, instituting the Peace Convention, had interposed an insurmountable obstacle to the reenforcement of Fort Sumter, unless attacked or in immediate danger of attack, without entirely defeating this beneficent measure. Among their other proceedings they had passed a resolution that ex-President John Tyler is hereby appointed by the concurrent vote of each branch of the General Assembly, a commissioner to the President of the United States; and Judge John Robertson is hereby appointed by a like vote, a commissioner to the State of South Carolina and the other States that have seceded or shall secede, with instructions respectfully to request the President of the United States and the authorities of such States to agree to abstain, pending the proceedings contemplated by the action of the General Assembly, from any and all acts calculated to produce a collision of arms between the States and the Government of the United States. Mr. Tyler arriv
gislature. The Senate, on Saturday, passed a bill authorizing the County Courts, &c., to arm the Militia and provide means therefore. The report of the Joint Committee on Federal Relations was amended and agreed to. Ex-President Tyler, Hon. Wm. C. Rives, Judge J. W. Brockenbrough, Hons. Geo. W. Summers and J. A. Seddon, were appointed Commissioners to visit Washington to confer with others from sister States. Ex-President Tyler was appointed a Commissioner to the President, and Judge John Robertson Commissioner to South Carolina, to request them to abstain, during the pendency of negotiations, from all acts calculated to produce a collision. Bills were reported authorizing the Northwestern Bank of Virginia to establish an agency in Richmond, and the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad Company to construct a branch and increase its capital stock; also, a bill to provide for taking the sense of the people of Henrico upon giving the County Court authority to raise money for arming the
ecure to the owners of slaves the right of transit with their slaves between and through the non-slaveholding States and Territories, constitute the basis of such an adjustment of the unhappy controversy which now divides the States of this Confederacy as would be accepted by the people of this Commonwealth. 6. Resolved, That Ex-President John Tyler be appointed by the concurrent vote of both Houses of the General Assembly, a Commissioner to the President of the United States, and Judge John Robertson be appointed in similar manner Commissioner to the State of South Carolina and the other States that have seceded or shall secede, with instructions respectfully to request the President of the United States and the authorities of such States to agree to abstain, pending the proceedings contemplated by the action of this General Assembly, from any and all acts calculated to produce a collision of arms between the States and the Government of the United States. 7. Resolved, That cop
was communicated to the House, with a request that it concur therein: Resolved, by the General Assembly of Virginia. That if all efforts to reconcile the unhappy differences existing between the two sections of the country shall prove to be abortive, then, in the opinion of the General Assembly, every consideration of honor and interest demands that Virginia should unite her destiny with the slaveholding States of the South. Mr. Hackley moved to lay on the table and print. Mr. Robertson, of Richmond, sustained the motion. Mr. Anderson advocated the immediate adoption of the resolution. He spoke of the wrongs inflicted on the South, and alluded to the fact that the whole North were now arming for her further subjugation. Mr. Myers, called for the reading of the resolution, and remarked that he would vote against laying it on the table, and in favor of its adoption. On Saturday last he voted against the resolution which was adopted, containing somewhat similar
Virginia State Convention--citizens' ticket. Judge John Robertson, J. Randolph Tucker, Patrick Henry Aylett. The above ticket will be voted for by all citizens who desire to maintain Virginia's rights, in the Union or out of it, at all hazards. ja 21--
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