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Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865 20 0 Browse Search
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Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 4 (search)
e from Americus, and he and his little stepson, Brown Ayres, are boarding with the Joyners. Dr. Robertson, of Virginia, and Capt. Graybill, of Macon, are also members of the household. In these daymy one new dress isn't made up yet, and everything else I have is too frazzled out to wear. Dr. Robertson and Capt. Graybill, both pretending to be good Episcopalians, urged me to go, but that unfinchmond. Everybody feels very blue, but not disposed to give up as long as we have Lee. Poor Dr. Robertson has been nearly distracted since he heard the news. His wife and five little children are ohespian Corps gave Richelieu at the theater this evening, for the benefit of the hospitals. Dr. Robertson acted the part of De Mauprat, and I dressed him for the occasion in the velvet cloak I boughsings a comic song so well that I told him I wondered how he ever escaped being a vagabond. Dr. Robertson had got leave to start for Virginia in the morning, and was having a farewell party of gentl
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 5 (search)
they recognized him they took off their hats and received him with every mark of respect due the president of a brave people. When he reined in his horse, all the staff who were present advanced to hold the reins and assist him to dismount, while Dr. and Mrs. Robertson hastened to offer the hospitality of their home. About forty of his immediate personal friends and attendants were with him, and they were all half-starved, having tasted nothing for twenty-four hours. Capt. Irwin came running Mrs. Robertson hastened to offer the hospitality of their home. About forty of his immediate personal friends and attendants were with him, and they were all half-starved, having tasted nothing for twenty-four hours. Capt. Irwin came running home in great haste to ask mother to send them something to eat, as it was reported the Yankees were approaching the town from two opposite directions closing in upon the President, and it was necessary to hurry him off at once. There was not so much as a crust of bread in our house, everything available having been given to soldiers. There was some bread in the kitchen that had just been baked for a party of soldiers, but they were willing to wait, and I begged some milk from Aunt Sallie, an
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 8 (search)
negroes before he came, and now they are as mad as he is. Bravo! little Yank; I really begin to respect you. July 24, Monday We had a dancing party at Dr. Robertson's in the evening. Most of the young men go to parties fully armed. The parlor mantelpiece at the bank was covered with pistols brought there by our escorts, re breakfast, and met neither Yankees nor negroes. The freedmen are living up to their privileges now, and leave the early morning hours to us white trash. Willie Robertson told me about an adventure of his that might have strayed out of a New York Ledger story. Returning home late the other night, from an evening call, he fouck and helped on the fun. The Daniels are as thick as peas there,--and as nice. But pleasant as it all was, the best part of our trip was the journey home. Willie Robertson put Buck, our driver, on his horse, and he and I mounted the box and drove home that way. It was a delightfully cool seat-so high and airy; I felt as if I we