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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of the First Maryland regiment. (search)
hed his way rapidly on the hill until within reach of the cannonneers at the guns, when a squadron of cavalry came rapidly down the hill, evidently intended for the centre of the skirmishers. Smith was immediately ordered back to form with Captain Robertson and repel their charge, but they retired without making an attack. The right of our line then swung rapidly round, while Goldsborough and Nicholas closed in on them on the left, in a run, in conjunction with Wheat. Their colors was captured in their camp by Private Drers, Company H, together with their camp fixtures, tents, &c., and some prisoners, while Smith, Herbert, Robertson, and Murray were pressing them as they crossed the railroad bridge over the Shenandoah. Private Tom Levering, Company H, brought seven prisoners to the Colonel, and Valiant, Company E, brought a Lieutenant with a fine horse and equipments. They had been driven so rapidly over the bridges that no time was allowed to burn them; a small fire kindled o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
r as they went through the woods, where the men were lying so thick that he stepped on a man's leg, and the fellow pulling his leg away tripped him up and he fell, another soldier springing up and taking his place at the litter. They evidently thought he was shot, and history so has it that one of the men at the litter was shot down. But not so. Mr. Busick was that man. In his opinion that Jackson was not shot by his own men he is borne out by many other old soldiers who were present. Mr. Robertson, near Pelham, in Caswell county, was lying on that road, and had his gun barrel bent by a shot from the same charge that swept the road just about the time that Jackson was killed. He sprang into the woods.--Reidsville (N. C.) Times. In reference to the wounding of the litter-bearer, we have the following in a letter from Dr. Thomas P. Perkins, of Wilmington, Fluvanna county, Va., whom we have known from our boyhood, and for whose high character we can vouch: * * The man who was bear
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaigns of the civil war — ChancellorsvilleGettysburg. (search)
per cent. in his strength as compared with May 31. These are the only two divisions whose returns near the date of the battle have been found, so far as I know. To sum up — Stuart's cavalry was increased by 3,000 after May 31, but like the Federal cavalry had been seriously lessened by severe marching and fighting. If the Federal cavalry could only muster 12,000 out of 16,000 on July 1, Stuart could not have had over 10,000 or 11,000 out of 13,300. But of Stuart's seven brigades three (Robertson's, Jones's and Imboden's) were not present at Gettysburg, having been engaged (like French's Federal division at Frederick, which is not included in Meade's numbers) in protecting communications, guarding supplies, &c., in the rear. So Stuart had 6,000 or 7,000 cavalry at Gettysburg. The Confederate infantry and artillery numbered 64,159 less the small losses in the battles about Winchester, and the far greater losses from the exhaustion of a march of two hundred miles. These losses ha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Longstreet's report of the Pennsylvania campaign. (search)
and E. M.Officers and E. M. McLaws's Division.      Kershaw's Brigade,11548332630  Semmes's Brigade,5528491430  Barksdale's Brigade,10555092747  Wofford's Brigade,30192112334  Total,30515093272141 Pickett's Division.    Only those are reported killed and wounded who are known to be so. Many of the missing are supposed to be killed or wounded. Garnett's Brigade,78324539941 Armistead's Brigade,884606431191 Kemper's Brigade,58356317731 Total,224114014992863  Hood's Division.      Robertson's Brigade,84393120597  Law's Brigade,74276146496  Anderson's Brigade,10551254671  Benning's Brigade,76299122497  Anderson's Brigade,25102 127Funkstown, Md,. July 10, 1863. Total,36415824422388  Total Infantry,893423122687392  Walton's Battalion Art.,340548Including 17 wounded at Williamsport, Md., July 6th, 1863. Alexander's Battalion Art.,19112 131 Cabell's Battalion Art.,829 37 Dearing's Battalion Art.,817 25 Henry's Battalion Art.,224 26 Total Artiller
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
Ford to Hazel Run, with his brigades in the following order, from left to right, viz: Wilcox, Wright, Mahone, Perry and Featherston. McLaws stood upon his right with Cobb, Kershaw, Barksdale and Semmes. Pickett formed on McLaws's right with Jenkins, Corse, Kemper, Armistead and Garnett. Hood held the extreme right, and extended his line to Hamilton's crossing, over five miles distant from the left flank; his brigades being Laws's, F. T. Anderson's, Benning's, and the Texas brigade under Robertson. Ransom, with his own and Cooke's brigades, formed the reserve. The Engineer and Artillery officers were ordered to assign positions to the artillery, and to build pits for them, but their positions were ordered to be located, more with a view to reply to the enemy's batteries which were being built on the north bank of the river, than to be used in repelling assaults upon their own positions. The work of fortification went on very slowly, on account of the great scarcity of tools, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 9.91 (search)
General Wade Hampton. 1st North Carolina. 2d North Carolina. 10th Virginia. Cobb's Georgia Legion. Jeff. Davis Legion. Lee's Brigade. Brigadier-General Fitz. Lee. 1st Virginia. 3d Virginia. 4th Virginia. 5th Virginia. 9th Virginia. Robertson's Brigade. Brigadier-General B. H. Robertson. 2d Virginia. 6th Virginia. 7th Virginia. 12th Virginia. 17th Virginia Battalion. Artillery. Hart's South Carolina Battery. Pelham's Virginia Battery. Artillery. The following artillery Brigadier-General B. H. Robertson. 2d Virginia. 6th Virginia. 7th Virginia. 12th Virginia. 17th Virginia Battalion. Artillery. Hart's South Carolina Battery. Pelham's Virginia Battery. Artillery. The following artillery organizations were in the Army of Northern Virginia, July 23 and October 4, 1862, but with the exceptions noted, they do not appear in the reports of the battles of Manassas Plains. First Virginia Regiment. Colonel J. T. Brown. Coke's Va. Battery, (Williamsburg Artillery.) Dance's Va. Battery, (Powhatan Artillery.) Hupp's Va. Battery, (Salem Artillery.) Macon's Battery, (Richmond Fayette Artillery.) Smith's Battery, (3d Co. Richmond Howitzers.) Watson's Battery, (2d Co. Richmond Howitze