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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for C. W. Robertson or search for C. W. Robertson in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 39 (search)
W. Clark. Fiftieth Alabama, Colonel J. G. Coltart. Seventeenth Alabama Battalion (S. S.), Captain James F. Nabers. Robertson's Battery, Lieutenant S. H. Dent. Manigault's brigade. Brigadier-General A. M. Manigault. Twenty-fourth Alabamee, Lieutenant-Colonel J. D. Tillman. Fiftieth Tennessee, Colonel C. A. Sugg, Lieutenant-Colonel T. W. Beaumont, Major C. W. Robertson, and Colonel C. H. Walker.( Third Tennessee.) First Tennessee Battalion, Majors S. H. Colms and C. W. RobertsC. W. Robertson.( Fiftieth Tennessee.) Seventh Texas, Major K. M. Vanzandt. Bledsoe's (Mo.) Battery, Lieutenant R. L. Wood. McNair's brigade. Brigadier-General E. McNair. Colonel D. Coleman. First Arkansas Mounted Rifles, Colonel Robert W. Harper. bama. Fifteenth Alabama, Colonel W. C. Oates. Forty-fourth Alabama. Forty-seventh Alabama. Forty-eighth Alabama. Robertson's brigade. served part of the time in Johnson's provisional division. Brigadier-General J. B. Robertson-Colonel V
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last chapter in the history of Reconstruction in South Carolina—Administration of D. H. Chamberlain. (search)
the house. As it was very late, General Butler left the place and went to Mr. Robert Butler's, where he spent the night. Such is the substance of General Butler's statement. In a subsequent letter, called out by Chamberlain's letter to Senator Robertson, he indignantly said: No man knows better than Chamberlain that what he says in that letter to Robertson is false in every essential particular. No one knows better than himself that he has published it in the bloody-shirt outrage interestRobertson is false in every essential particular. No one knows better than himself that he has published it in the bloody-shirt outrage interest. Meanwhile a coroner's inquest, conducted by Prince Rivers, with the assistance of Harmost, was sitting on the case, and continued its sessions until the end of the month. The result of this inquest was a verdict of murder against seven men, and eighty others of being accessory to the murder, and warrants of arrest were served by the sheriff on all who lived in South Carolina of the men thus accused (at least one had been dead several years, two were in California, and one was, on the night
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
ed of 15,855 men, Jackson's Second corps of 11,400, with him also was the cavalry division of J. E. B. Stuart, comprising the brigades of Fitz. Lee, Hampton, and Robertson, the latter under Munford, the whole probably, for there are no reports of the cavalry, numbering as many as 4,500, his artillery is estimated at 3,000 effectivegomery and Frederick counties, from the Potomac to New Market, beyond the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, and on the National turnpike from Baltimore to Frederick. Robertson's brigade, under Munford, was posted on the right with his advance at Poolesville; Hampton's at Hyattstown, and Fitz. Lee's at New Market; cavalry headquarters w cordon of cavalry, covering about twenty miles between the Federal and Confederate armies. Munford, with the Second and Twelfth Virginia cavalry (the rest of Robertson's brigade being on detached service), was moved back to Jefferson and thence to Crampton's Gap; Fitz Lee was directed to move from New Market around Frederick to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga. (search)
eneral Buckner to detach a brigade and reinforce General Hood. For this purpose Colonel Trigg was ordered to advance in the direction of the firing, and to give the required support. The action soon became hot in front. Trigg joined Brigadier-General Robertson, of Hood's division, and attacked the enemy. They were broken in confusion. The Sixth Florida, under Colonel Findley, sustained heavy loss, but owing to some misapprehension of orders, the brigade failed to capture the enemy's batter of fire from this fine command reanimated our men, and disheartened the enemy, who relinquished their first position, and fell back to a second ridge, occupied by a strong force and posted behind fieldworks. A momentary lull ensued. Brigadier-General Robertson reported to me, and I directed him to occupy and hold the position from which Gracie had withdrawn to replenish his ammunition. I sent, at this time, for Colonel Kelly, who reported in person, and informed me that the enemy in his fro