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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 19 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. W. Robertson or search for J. W. Robertson in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
companies, regiments and brigades. Nothing further ever came of this movement. The companies of Dorsey, Murray and Robertson were, late in May and early in June, mustered into the Virginia service at Richmond, and then transferred to the First corps, consisting of Stewart's and Preston's divisions. The artillery consisted of the battalions of Majors Williams, Robertson and Leyden, together with some other batteries attached to brigades. As soon as day of the 20th had dawned, I rode tf brigades. Honorable mention should also be made of Brigadier-General Humphreys, Benning, Deas, Clayton, Bate, Brown, Robertson and Manigault. For more detailed accounts of the noble deeds performed by our gallant officers and brave soldiers, I r of Texas. Governor Ireland. 3. Southern Historical Society. Rev. J. Wm. Jones. 4. Army of Northern Virginia. Colonel J. W. Robertson. 5. The Brave Boys in Blue—Our Foes in War—Our Friends in Peace. General G. W. Russ. 6. Army of Tennessee. Ge
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Maryland line in the Confederate Army. (search)
rs congregated at Leesburg, and on June 6th, 1861, held a meeting, at which five counties and the City of Baltimore were represented, of which Coleman Yellott was President, and Frank A. Bond, Secretary. They formed an association, calling themselves The Independent Association of the Maryland Line, and adopted a constitution which provided for organizing the members into companies, regiments and brigades. Nothing further ever came of this movement. The companies of Dorsey, Murray and Robertson were, late in May and early in June, mustered into the Virginia service at Richmond, and then transferred to the First Maryland regiment, which they joined at Winchester, June 16, 1861. As this regiment was marching into the battle of Manassas, July 21, 1861, Captain Charles Snowden presented to us a flag which had been brought through the lines by Miss Hettie Carey. It was a Maryland State color, with the arms of the State painted on blue silk on the one side, and on the other, Presen
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chickamauga. (search)
t wing, composed of Hood's and Hindman's divisions, an improved division under Brigadier-General B. R. Johnson, and Buckner's corps, consisting of Stewart's and Preston's divisions. The artillery consisted of the battalions of Majors Williams, Robertson and Leyden, together with some other batteries attached to brigades. As soon as day of the 20th had dawned, I rode to the front to find my troops. The line was arranged from the right to left as follows: Stewart's, Johnson's, Hindman's and of division), Kershaw, Patton, Anderson, Gracie, McNair), (severely wounded), and Colonels Trigg and Kelly, both in command of brigades. Honorable mention should also be made of Brigadier-General Humphreys, Benning, Deas, Clayton, Bate, Brown, Robertson and Manigault. For more detailed accounts of the noble deeds performed by our gallant officers and brave soldiers, I refer you to the reports of my junior officers. The steady good conduct throughout the long conflict of the subordinate offi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
Then followed a magnificent banquet, over which Governor Ireland gracefully presided. We regret that our space does not allow us to give a full report of the speeches made—many of which were of a high order of merit—but we can only give the regular toasts and the names of the respondents: The first toast was Our Guests. Responded to by General Lee. 2. The State of Texas. Governor Ireland. 3. Southern Historical Society. Rev. J. Wm. Jones. 4. Army of Northern Virginia. Colonel J. W. Robertson. 5. The Brave Boys in Blue—Our Foes in War—Our Friends in Peace. General G. W. Russ. 6. Army of Tennessee. General G. D. Johnston. 7. The Chief Executive of the Storm-cradled Nation that fell—who has proven true to his Principles and his People in War and in Peace, in Prosperity and Adversity-Jefferson Davis. Governor F. R. Lubbock. 8. The Matchless Soldier, the Knightly Gentleman, Grand in War, Great in Peace—Robert Edward Lee. Norman G. Kittrell. 9. The Army of the Tr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General S. B. Buckner of the battle of Chickamauga. (search)
under the able direction of Brigadier-General Preston, the first two brigades passed Kershaw's and Anderson's brigades, which had suffered severely in the action, and, with great impetuosity assailed the enemy in his almost impregnable position. Trigg, on coming up, was directed to the left of Kelly, and joining in a simultaneous movement of Brigadier-General B. R. Johnson's division still farther to the left, pierced and turned the enemy's line, and, in conjunction with Kelly, Gracie and Robertson drove him from his strong position into the ravines beyond, where a large number of prisoners were captured. For the details of this brilliant action, I refer you to the graphic report of Brigadier-General Preston. While this action was progressing, the Lieutenant-General commanding directed Stewart's division to advance, and to aid the combined attack, I ordered, by his authority, Williams's battalion of reserve artillery to be placed in position in front of Poe's house. This was don
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
opies of which he has kindly favored us. McDonough school, McDonough P. O., Baltimore county, Md., February 3, 1883. My Dear Doctor,—I hope your publication of Colonel Scott's roster of our army may lead to perfecting it. Let me ask, Did Robertson's cavalry brigade contain the 17thVirginia battalion? In Robertson's report only the 2d, 6th, 7th and 12th Virginia regiments are enumerated. Does not this 17th creep in from an allusion in Stuart's report where 17th may be a misprint for 7th?Robertson's report only the 2d, 6th, 7th and 12th Virginia regiments are enumerated. Does not this 17th creep in from an allusion in Stuart's report where 17th may be a misprint for 7th? Cannot Colonel Cutshaw or some of the artillery officers at hand (Colonel Carter for instance) give the assignment of the large number of batteries which Colonel Scott classes as miscellaneous? Some of them are, perhaps, only different names for batteries already enumerated. The artillery reports are, I know from experience, sometimes exasperating in their want of precision as regards names and commands, and it is therefore not surprising that Colonel Scott despaired of placing these batte