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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott). You can also browse the collection for Joseph Linden Robertson or search for Joseph Linden Robertson in all documents.

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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), March 9-14, 1862.-expedition toward Pardy and operations about Crump's Landing, Tenn. (search)
bedient, humble servant, Charles Baskerville, Major, Commanding. Brig. Gen. Daniel Ruggles. Hdqrs. Second Battalion Mississippi Cavalry Purdy, Tenn., March 14, 1862. Colonel: In obedience to your orders I took Captains McCaa's and Robertson's companies (except that portion already on duty) down the Shunpike road to ascertain if the enemy had reconstructed the bridge. At the Pittsburg fork I detached 19 men, under command of Lieutenant O'Daniel, to proceed to Pittsburg. I herewitrg road near the fork; whereupon I left the main road to place my men between my camp and the enemy if all the rumors and excited reports should prove true, and also as my guns were in such a condition that they would not fire, and besides, Captain Robertson's company being without cartridge boxes, his ammunition was exposed to the rain and unfit for use. The signal-guns reported I cannot account for, unless they were the guns fired by the picket guards of our troops, 4 miles distant. A
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
. Sharpshooters. Blythe's Mississippi. Robertson's battery. Ketchum's battery. Third Brigason's and Gober's brigades. At this time Robertson's battery, of General Trapier's division, wh Orleans Guards Battery of six guns, and Captain Robertson, with his battery of 12-pounder field guds our pursuit was checked by the opening of Robertson's battery on our left, which swept the fieldthey rallied for a short time. A section of Robertson's battery here took a position to our left ao leave Colonel Deas' regiment, four guns of Robertson's battery, and a detail of 150 men from eachninth Mississippi Regiments, and two guns of Robertson's battery. Colonel Mills had been driven ba the road near the bridge. I had one gun of Robertson's battery placed this side of the bridge in nd gallantly handled by Lieutenant Dent, of Robertson's battery) promptly and rapidly returned theh his and one other regiment and two guns of Robertson's battery, and proceed to the rear with the
9th my orders were substantially to follow the brigade until near the scene of action, then to make myself useful wherever I could. Accordingly I kept with your command as closely as the nature of the ground would permit, and when near the scene of the engagement passed the brigade on the left flank and reached the front in time to witness a charge of the enemy's cavalry on one of our batteries. This charge was promptly and gallantly repulsed by that battery (I have since learned it was Robertson's). I soon placed my guns in battery on its right, but not soon enough to assist it in what it individually accomplished. From this point we advanced through fields until, when approaching a thick undergrowth, we, together with others in the field, received a volley of small-arms. At the same time I observed to our right and front a small body of cavalry. The battery opened fire upon them, using shell, when they almost instantly retired. I cannot omit here mentioning that Captain [W