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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Michael Stone Robertson or search for Michael Stone Robertson in all documents.

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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: Marylanders enlist, and organize to defend Virginia and the Confederacy. (search)
provost-marshal and the garrison and the detectives could not still the refrain— The despot's heel is on thy shore, Maryland! His torch is at thy temple door, Maryland! for it was in the hearts of the people and it was true! The rendezvous of the drilled volunteers produced three crack companies under Capt. E. R. Dorsey, Baltimore City Guards; Capt. Wm. H. Murray, Maryland Guards, and Capt. J. Lyle Clarke, Independent Grays. And soon after was organized another company under Capt. Michael Stone Robertson, of Charles county, whose company came from the counties of St. Mary's, Calvert and Charles. These Richmond companies were mustered into the service of Virginia, May 17th and 18th and June 17th. Captain Clarke elected to take his company into the Twenty-first Virginia regiment. It served its year with great eclat and was the crack company of that part of the army. The other three were united to the battalion at Harper's Ferry. Virginia troops had by that time been taken en m
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: Marylanders in 1862 under Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Stonewall Jackson. (search)
arrived at the top of the hill, the head of the column was turned to the right, and when the colors came in by the left flank, charge! was the order. The right battalion swung into line and charged in a run. The left battalion jumped into place and went along. There is no such movement or order in any tactics, but it was sufficient. The enemy, thirty yards off, was lying behind a worm fence and, as the Marylanders came into line, a volley from the fence swept down Colonel Johnson, Captain Robertson, Lieutenant Snowden, Sergeant Doyle, and twenty of the men in ranks. The colonel's new uniform procured him especial attention. Three bullets, tearing off the pommel of his saddle and cutting down his horse, dismounted him, but he was on his feet in a moment and with his regiment at the fence. Their opponents, the Pennsylvania Bucktails, broke, and as they ran across the open field, the Marylanders pelted them with great comfort and satisfaction. Few escaped, the Bucktails were nea
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: Marylanders in 1862 under Gen. Robert E. Lee. (search)
ers in 1862 under Gen. Robert E. Lee. After Cross Keys and Port Republic, when Fremont and Shields were sent whirling down the valley, Jackson made a feint of pursuit, and pushed his cavalry some marches after them. He ordered the First Maryland to Staunton to recruit, where, during the next ten days, Company I was mustered out on June 17th, its time having expired. These men .left the regiment with the respect of the whole command and the love of their colonel. Their captain, Michael Stone Robertson, belonged to an historic family in Charles county and was a descendant of Col. John H. Stone, colonel of the First regiment of the Maryland Line of the Revolution. His words as he fell were, Go on, boys, don't mind me, and he died at his next breath. Lieut. Nicholas Snowden, of Company D, who died at the same time, had been captain of a cavalry company in Prince George's in 1860-61, and had joined Captain Herbert, his cousin, at Harper's Ferry, early in May, 1861. He was as hones
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), chapter 11 (search)
Platt. Sergeants, James Farrell, Louis Neidhammer, James Shields. Corporals, George Ross, Eli Fishpan, Samuel Kirk, Charles Fercoit. Musician, Andrew Myers. Company H—Captain, Wm. H. Murray. FirstLieu-tenant, George Thomas. Second-Lieutenant, Francis X. Ward, Richard T. Gilmor, W. P. Dollinger. FirstSer-geant, John H. Sullivan. Sergeants, McHenry Howard, James Lyon, Chapman B. Briscoe. Corporals, Edward Johnson, Richard C. Mackall, Clapham Murray, Wm. S. Lemmon. Company I—Captain, Michael S. Robertson. FirstLieu-tenant, Hugh Mitchell. Second-Lieutenant, Hezekiah H. Bean, Eugene Diggs. First-Sergeant, John J. Brawner. Sergeants, John H. Stone, F. L. Higdon, Wm. H. Rison, Warren W. Ward. Corporals, Z. Francis Freeman, Francis L. Higdon, Thomas I. Green, Thomas L. Hannon. Company C (Second)—Captain, Edmund Barry. First-Lieutenant, John Marshall. Second-Lieutenant, Wm. H. Edelin, Tom Washington Smith. First-Sergeant, Albert Tolson. Sergeants, Richard Brown, William Barry