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Dec. 27. A meeting of the citizens of Pittsburgh, Pa., was held, to give expression to the public indignation created by the removal of ordnance to the Southern forts. General William Robinson presided. Resolutions were adopted, declaring loyalty to the Union, deprecating any interference with the shipment of arms under government orders, however inopportune or impolitic the order might appear; deploring the existing state of things in connection with the administration of important departments of the public service, so as to have shaken confidence in the people of the free States; that, while Pennsylvania is on guard at the Federal capital, it is her special duty to look to the fidelity of her sons, and in that view call on the President as a citizen of this Commonwealth, to see that the public receive no detriment at his hands. It behooves the President to purge his cabinet of every man known to give aid and comfort to, or in any way countenancing the revolt of any State aga
n, P. 56; ancedote of a young lady in, P. 113 Ringgold Flying Artillery at Reading, Pa., D. 27 Rives, W. C., delegate to Southern Congress, D. 49; speech of, at Atlanta, Ga., P. 95 Rives, W. H., Dr., of Ala., P. 94 Robert McClellan, the revenue cutter, surrendered, D. 16 Robins, Harry, the wife of, P. 148 Robinson, —, Judge, of Troy, N. Y., D. 27 Robinson, —, Judge, of Virginia, offers the command of the Southern army to Gen. Scott, P. 41 Robinson, William, D. 6 Rochester, N. Y., abolition meeting at, D. 14; flag-raising at, D. 103; regiment from, D. 84 Rock Island, Ill., D. 51 Romeyn, W. H., D. 32 Romney, Va., rebels surprised at, D. 101 Roosevelt, J. J., Doc. 135 Ross, —, speech in the U. S. Senate, Feb. 14, 1803, Int. 41 Rossiter, T. P., P. 118 Rousseau, —, speech in the Ky. Senate, May 21, D. 91; Doc. 329 Roxbury, Mass., flag presentation at, D. 50; war meeting in, D. 61; patriotism of the
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 9.-the battle of West-point, Va. Fought May 7, 1862. (search)
Kelly, Thirty-second New-York, Thomas Alterdys, Thirty-second New-York; E. B. Mulligan, Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania; J. A. Slocum, Thirty-second New-York; Pat Kildernay, Thirty-second New-York; M. O'Donnell, Thirty-second New-York; Oliver Wells, Sixteenth New-York; J. M. Smart, Thirty-second New-York; Richard Macnelly, Thirty-second New-York; John Stevens, First New-York artillery; A. F. Sawyer, Thirty-second New-York; C. Hagan, Thirty-second New--York; C. W. Smith, Thirty-second New-York; W. Robinson, George Cupping, Thirty-first New-York; James A. Day, Fifth Maine;----Etheridge, Thirty-second New-York; Jacob Walen, Thirty--first New-York; Lancert Parker, Fifth Maine; Freman Waymoth, Sixteenth New-York; F. Detra, Thirty-first New-York; A. Carlton, Thirty-second New-York; W. C. Sweeney, Thirty-second New-York; C. Gumrin, Thirty-second New-York; William Luisener, Thirty--second New-York; H. M. Helms, Sixteenth New-York; L. Parrin, Sixteenth New-York; C. Thockeray, Ninety-fifth Pennsylva
ay. Of course it is impossible at this time to chronicle but a small portion of the casualties and incidents. We give such as we have been able to obtain. The Twelfth Virginia and the Third Alabama behaved nobly. Both regiments were cut up badly. The Richmond Grays lost two killed and five wounded and missing. Probably no regiment suffered more than the Third Alabama. Besides Col. Lomax, Adjt. Johnson, Capt. Mays, Capt. Phelan, and Lieut. James Brown were killed, and Capt. Ready, Capt. Robinson, Lieut. Witherspoon, Lieut. Gardner, Lieut. Patridge were wounded. The casualties were among the officers alone. The slaughter among the privates was terrific. The Lynchburgh artillery, formerly known as Latham's battery, now commanded by Captain James Dearing, did good service in the fight. The men fought bravely and laid many a Yankee upon the ground. Capt. Dearing entered with thirty-four cannoneers, and had nineteen wounded. He also had between thirty and forty horses disabled
ne to defy an army of fifty thousand men. I at once sent for Col. Carroll, Lieut.-Colonel Shriber, Captains Clark and Robinson, who had been over the ground, they all agreeing in the opinion that an attack would result in the destruction of our liather into the woods opposite their position, evidently with a view of outflanking us upon the left. Captains Clark and Robinson opened their batteries upon them with effect, and Capt. Huntington's guns were soon doing the same good work. Two compahe rear of the battery, composed of three guns of Capt. Clark's battery, three guns of Capt. Huntington's, and one of Capt. Robinson's battery, under Lieut.-Col. Hayward, and upon him and his gallant band depended everything at this critical moment, ers of the different regiments discharged their duty nobly, and deserve special mention by their Colonels, Capts. Clark, Robinson, and Huntington served their guns with great credit, and deserve particular notice. To the members of your staff, Lie
erhaps, the steam was stopped, when the Caroline troop, opening fire, disclosed the ruse, and, putting on steam again, on sped the train towards the Chickahominy, and despite logs placed on the track, made good its escape, but the carriages being but uncovered freight-trucks, and having soldiers on them, the slaughter that ensued was frightful. Many of the enemy jumped from the train, and were afterwards captured or killed to the number of twenty or more. The engineer was shot dead by Lieut. Robinson. Still adding to their conquests at every step, a detachment was immediately sent to the White House, on the Pamunkey, and discovering four large transports moored there, and some hundred wagons or more, with teams, etc., in a wagonyard, all these were instantly seized, to the great fright and astonishment of the Federals, and the torch immediately applied to all things combustible. One of the transports escaped and floated down the river. The contents of the other three were chief
lank, and Kearney's division was advanced to protect the left, General Robinson's brigade joining Grover's. Hooker's Third brigade, commanded nemy suddenly appeared on the left of Hooker, and sharply attacked Robinson's brigade, but they were soon driven back, with mutual loss. At sunset the day was ours, indisputably. Birney's brigade relieved Robinson, and Couch's division remained on the field. We had conquered a bets aids had horses killed under them, and Lieut. Whiting, aid to Gen. Robinson, lost an arm. Colonel Morrison, a volunteer aid, was also woundmewhat, and the Nineteenth lost some forty-five men. Sickles's and Robinson's brigades also suffered severely. But the casualty lists will apt, and advanced until they completed the line from Grover's left. Robinson's brigade (late Jameson's) was subsequently pushed in between Berrnst the enemy. Pushing in on Grover's left and between Grover and Robinson, he went at it in gallant style, and entirely cleared the woods.
possession of the field, and our men all being prisoners, had no opportunity to make examination, until paroled, at which time the enemy had buried their dead, and sent off most of their wounded. I herewith append a list of Federals killed and wounded, furnished me by Dr. W. T. McNees, Assistant-Surgeon of the Seventh Kentucky cavalry. killed.--Thomas Ware, U. S. Commissioner, Cynthiana Home Guards; Thomas Rankin, Harrison Co. Home Guards; Capt. Lafe Wilson, do.; Jesse Current, do.; Wm. Robinson, do.; Nathan Kennedy, Home Guards; James Atchison, do.; Simpson Eaton, do.; Wm. Stewart, do.; Lafayette Reading, Co. E, Eighteenth Kentucky volunteers; Wm. Preston, Co. I, do.; John Crawford, Seventh Kentucky cavalry; Jerry Lawson, do.; Samuel Plunkett, do.; Lewis Wolff, Newport, Ky., Home Guards; Wm. S. Shipman, do.; Thomas Hartburn, Cincinnati, Pendleton Guards. wounded.--Capt. S. G. Rogers, Co. I, Eighteenth Kentucky, slightly; Thos. S. Duval, Home Guards, arm amputated; Hector Reed
f the twenty-ninth and thirtieth. Generals Birney, Robinson and Grover, of Heintzelman's corps, commanded theilonel Poe with Berry's brigade, in first line, General Robinson, First brigade, on his right, partly in line assure. Accordingly I detached on that purpose General Robinson, with his brigade, the Sixty-third Pennsylvani Third Michigan Marksmen, under Col. Champlin. General Robinson drove forward for several hundred yards, but toon reoccupied with Birney's brigade, supported by Robinson, a very advanced block of woods. The key-point ofed efforts of my Generals of brigades — Birney and Robinson. My regiments all did well, and the remiss in camods. On the twenty-seventh, with two sections and Robinson's brigade, Capt. Randolph had powerfully contributice to the part taken by my First brigade, under Gen. Robinson, and Randolph's battery, in the affair of the twn addition I beg to mention Lieut. Bull, Davidson, Robinson, Tate, Chrisman and Colwell, who remained on the f
tions of the twenty-ninth and thirtieth. Generals Birney, Robinson and Grover, of Heintzelman's corps, commanded their brigasted Colonel Poe with Berry's brigade, in first line, General Robinson, First brigade, on his right, partly in line and partrom pressure. Accordingly I detached on that purpose General Robinson, with his brigade, the Sixty-third Pennsylvania volunly, the Third Michigan Marksmen, under Col. Champlin. General Robinson drove forward for several hundred yards, but the cent, but soon reoccupied with Birney's brigade, supported by Robinson, a very advanced block of woods. The key-point of this ne renewed efforts of my Generals of brigades — Birney and Robinson. My regiments all did well, and the remiss in camp seeme the woods. On the twenty-seventh, with two sections and Robinson's brigade, Capt. Randolph had powerfully contributed to Ger justice to the part taken by my First brigade, under Gen. Robinson, and Randolph's battery, in the affair of the twenty-se
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