Browsing named entities in Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches. You can also browse the collection for William Robinson or search for William Robinson in all documents.

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Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Frank W. Bird, and the Bird Club. (search)
onal friends, Sumner, Wilson, and Frank Bird himself. In 1872 Emerson said to a member of the club: I do not like William Robinson. His hand is against every man ; but it is doubtful if Robinson ever published so hard a criticism of any person, aRobinson ever published so hard a criticism of any person, and certainly none so unjust. Emerson without being aware of it was strongly influenced by a cabal for the overthrow of Robinson, in which General Butler took a leading hand. Robinson was clerk of the State Senate, and could not afford to lose his pRobinson, in which General Butler took a leading hand. Robinson was clerk of the State Senate, and could not afford to lose his position; afterwards, when he did lose it, he fell sick and died. He preferred truth-telling and poverty to a compromising prosperity, and left no one to fill his place. Frank B. Sanborn was for a time editor of the Boston Commonwealth, and afterwRobinson was clerk of the State Senate, and could not afford to lose his position; afterwards, when he did lose it, he fell sick and died. He preferred truth-telling and poverty to a compromising prosperity, and left no one to fill his place. Frank B. Sanborn was for a time editor of the Boston Commonwealth, and afterwards of the Springfield Republican; but he was better known as the efficient Secretary of the Board of State Charities, a position to which he was appointed by Governor Andrew, and from which he was unjustly removed by Governor Ames, twenty years lat
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Sumner. (search)
l was judicially murdered by Louis XV. Washington City was an oligarchical despotism. A dark cloud hung over the Republic during the winter of 1860-‘61. The impending danger was that war would break out before Lincoln could be inaugurated. Such secrecy was observed by the Republican leaders that even Horace Greeley could not fathom their intentions. Late in December John A. Andrew and George L. Stearns went to Washington to survey the ground for themselves, and the latter wrote to William Robinson, The watchword is, keep quiet. He probably obtained this from Sumner, and it gives the key to the whole situation. It demolishes Von Holst's finely-spun melodramatic theory in regard to that period of our history, in which he finally compares the condition of the United States to a drowning man who sees lurid flames before his eyes. In the Republican and Union parties there were all shades of compromise sentiment,--from those who were ready to sacrifice anything in order to prevent