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subsistence for the foraging parties. Great credit is due General Geary, Colonels Robinson, Dustin, and Carman, the officers commanding the several expeditions, alsis due to the commanders of the several escorts; Brigadier-General Geary, Colonels Robinson, Dustin, and Carman, and to Colonel Garrard, commanding cavalry brigade, anding. The brigades commanded respectively by Colonels Selfridge, Carman, and Robinson. Second division, Brigadier-General J. W. Geary commanding. Three brigades,lle. Some skirmishing was had, and the enemy's cavalry was driven away by Colonel Robinson's brigade just as we were going into camp. On the following morning, (tbut their pretentious defences were speedily abandoned as soon as a portion of Robinson's brigade, under Colonel West, Thirty-first Wisconsin volunteers, could cross h to the twentieth, several changes were made in the positions of the troops. Robinson's brigade of the First division was sent back to Cherokee Hill, to cover the r
sion, Brigadier-General A. J. Jackson commanding. The brigades commanded respectively by Colonels Selfridge, Carman, and Robinson. Second division, Brigadier-General J. W. Geary commanding. Three brigades, commanded by Colonels Pardee, Jones, and encamped about seven miles from Sandersville. Some skirmishing was had, and the enemy's cavalry was driven away by Colonel Robinson's brigade just as we were going into camp. On the following morning, (twenty-sixth,) two regiments of Carman's brapturing the whole party did not succeed; but their pretentious defences were speedily abandoned as soon as a portion of Robinson's brigade, under Colonel West, Thirty-first Wisconsin volunteers, could cross the swamp. The fugitives left behind a co now in our service. From the thirteenth to the twentieth, several changes were made in the positions of the troops. Robinson's brigade of the First division was sent back to Cherokee Hill, to cover the roads in our rear. Two regiments from Gear
avannah, Georgia, December 26, 1864. Lieutenant George Robinson, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Selfridge, in the centre; Third brigade, Colonel Robinson, on the left. The Second brigade, in ord Savannah Georgia, December 26, 1864. Colonel George Robinson, Commanding Third Brigade, First Divi go on a foraging expedition in charge of Colonel Robinson. On the same we loaded all wagons taken expeditions: the first, under command of Colonel Robinson, to Flat Rock, Georgia; and the second, umen; Third brigade, First division, under Colonel Robinson, one thousand two hundred men; Second bri fifty wagons with a strong escort, under Colonel Robinson, to cross and load in the fields beyond. l Bloodgood, (the expedition commanded by Colonel Robinson,) the regiment went on a foraging expeditthe regiment with brigade was reported to Colonel Robinson, commanding a brigade of First division, ed on the sixteenth, and was commanded by Colonel Robinson, of the First division, and also returned[6 more...]
marched with troops of the Second division, General Geary commanding, on forage expedition; also on the twenty-sixth October, with troops of First division, Colonel Robinson commanding; capturing, for use of command, in both expeditions, sixty bushels corn, and a quantity of corn-fodder. The battery remained in park until Noveof two weeks immediately succeeding its capture, when we were stationed in the works on East-Point railroad. Battery took part in foraging expedition, under Colonel Robinson, Eighty-second Ohio volunteer infantry, October sixteenth, going as far as Flat Rock Shoals, on South River. In the expedition were probably six hundred waged men. The battery then fell to my command. On the fourteenth instant, by command of Major Reynolds, I sent Lieutenant King, with a section, to report to Colonel Robinson, commanding Third brigade, First division, at Cherokee Hill. The balance of battery kept its position on the river until eleven o'clock A. M., on the twen
per day. Report of foraging expeditions sent out from Atlanta, Georgia, by the Twentieth army corps, army of Cumberland, in October, 1864. date . 1864Commandant.Quartermasters in Charge.Army Wagons.Ambulances.Two-Horse Wagons.CartsBuggies.Pounds Corn.Pounds Fodder.Commissary Stores in large quantities. Oct. 13thBrigadier-General Geary, Second division,Captain G. L. Parker, A. Q. M.420    352,80028,200Cattle, sheep, poultry, sweet potatoes, honey, butter, syrup, etc. Oct. 20thColonel Robinson, Eighty-second Illinois,Captain E. P. Graves, A. Q. M.6713381011551,48830,000do.do.do. Oct. 24thColonel Dustin,Captain M. Summers, A. Q. M.82551Vehicles of all classes.607,38050,000do.do.do. Oct. 29thBrigadier-General Geary, Second division,Captain G. L. Parker, A. Q. M.652 16 4420,80030,000do.do.do.         1,932,468138,200    The trains of the following commands were supplied with forage obtained on the expeditions: Fourth army corps, Fourteenth army corps, Fiftee
he occupation of Savannah, Georgia, December twenty-first, 1864: The regiment entered Atlanta the evening of September second, and was posted, September third, on the left of the McDonough road, removing to the right of the road on the fifth, when the regiment went into camp, doing picket, guard, and fatigue-duty on the fortifications, and all duty required of troops at garrison posts; remaining until October sixteenth, when it was ordered out on a forage expedition, under command of Colonel Robinson, commanding First brigade, First division, to the vicinity of Flat Shoals, Georgia; returning and occupying our former camp on the nineteenth, where it remained on duty until the twenty-sixth of the same month, when it was again ordered out on a similar expedition, under General John W. Geary, commanding Second division, Twentieth corps, to the vicinity of Yellow River, Georgia; returning to our previous camp on the twenty-ninth, resuming our regular routine of picket, fatigue-duty, etc
from their stronghold. Many pieces of artillery were taken, fourteen in all, and nearly a whole regiment of the enemy. These prisoners were turned over by Colonel Robinson, Fifth Texas, to Brigadier-General Pryor, or some of his staff. The enemy continued to fight, in retreat, with stubborn resistance, and it soon appeared tha. Company M. Sergeants Bullock and Morris; privates James W. Smith, R. O. Perry, McGary Burress, Blanton Humphreys, Johnson Newton, S. Rice, and Goodrich. Sergeant Robinson, company M, acted well. The aggregate loss is as follows: Killed, twenty-two; wounded, ninety-four; missing, three. I am, Captain, very respectfully, m each of the batteries of Captains Ancell and Milledge had been, by General A. P. Hill's orders, sent to join Captain McIntosh's battery. One of these men, private Robinson, of Captain Milledge's company, was slightly wounded, and one of the horses sent from Captain Ancell's battery died. Before concluding, I beg leave to say
r their good conduct: Colonels D. R. McRae, Iverson, and Christie ; Lieutenant-Colonels Johnston and Ruffin. The latter was wounded three times at South Mountain, and exhibited the highest qualities of the officer and soldier. Captains Garret, Robinson, Brookfield, Adjutant J. M. Taylor, and Lieutenant Peirce, of the Fifth; Captain Atwell, (killed,) and Lieutenant Caldwell, of the Twentieth, conducted themselves with soldier-like gallantry. Lieutenants King, Ray, Malone, Duguid, Felton, and Sbattles. Captain Ashford, commanding Thirty-eighth North Carolina, at Manassas Junction and at Manassas, where he was wounded, has entitled himself to notice, as well as promotion, by his uniform bravery and good conduct. Lieutenants Brown and Robinson, also of the same regiment, have attracted my attention more than once, as also Adjutant McIntyre. There are others, too numerous to mention, who have escaped my memory at this late hour. The list of casualties is as follows:  Killed.Woun