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Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for John K. Robinson or search for John K. Robinson in all documents.

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e First Division, which was composed of three brigades; BrigadierGeneral D. McM. Gregg, of the Second, consisting of two brigades; and Brigadier-General J. H. Wilson was afterward assigned to command the Third, also comprising two brigades. Captain Robinson, a veteran soldier of the Mexican war, was chief of artillery, and as such had a general supervision of that arm, though the batteries, either as units or in sections, were assigned to the different divisions in campaign. Each one of mynth New York, Major M. Henry Avery. Second Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph P. Brinton. Fourth Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel George H. Covode. Eighth Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel Samuel Wilson. Sixteenth Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel John K. Robinson. Third division. Brigadier-General James H. Wilson. Wilson graduated in 1860 in the Topographical Engineers, and was first assigned to duty in Oregon, where he remained till July, 1861. In the fall of that year his active se
advanced from behind their works at Richmond, and attacked Wilson and Gregg. Wilson's troops were driven back in some confusion at first; but Gregg, in anticipation of attack, had hidden a heavy line of dismounted men in a bushy ravine on his front, and when the enemy marched upon it, with much display and under the eye of the President of the Confederacy, this concealed line opened a destructive fire with repeating carbines; and at the same time the batteries of horse-artillery, under Captain Robinson, joining in the contest, belched forth shot and shell with fatal effect. The galling fire caused the enemy to falter, and while still wavering Wilson rallied his men, and turning some of them against the right flank of the Confederates, broke their line, and compelled them to withdraw for security behind the heavy works thrown up for the defense of the city in 1862. By destroying the meadow bridge and impeding my column on the Mechanicsville pike, the enemy thought to corner us com