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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Sallie Robinson or search for Sallie Robinson in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 20: a brave officer's mortification.--history set right. (search)
Tinkham. Steamer Kineo. Lieutenant-Commander, Geo. M. Ransom; Acting-Masters, Oliver Colbourn and John Whitmore; Assistant Surgeon, O. S. Oberly; Second-Assistant Engineer, S. W. Cragg; Third-Assistant Engineers, C. F. Hollingsworth, C. J. McConnell and James Manghlin; Acting-Masters' Mates, John Bartol, W. H. Davis, G. A. Faunce and W. S. Keen. Steamer Katahdin. Commander, George H. Preble; Lieutenant, Nathaniel Green; Acting-Masters, George Harris and W. H. Pollup; Assistant Surgeon, S. Robinson; Second-Assistant Engineer, T. M. Dukehart; Third-Assistant Engineers, Wm. J. Reid, W. W. Heaton and John McIntyre; Acting-Masters' Mates, A. Hartshorn, Geo. Leonard, J. W. Thode and A. Whiting. Steamer Mississippi. Commander, Melancton Smith; Lieutenants, Thos. McK. Buchanan and George Dewey; Acting-Masters, C. T. Chase, F. E. Ellis, F. T. King and George Munday; Midshipmen, Albert S. Barker and E. T. Woodward; Surgeon, R. T. Maccoun; Assistant Surgeon, J. W. Shively; Pay
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
d unarmed vessels had been practiced with impunity, and Farragut determined to repress it if possible. He had sent messengers several times to the town of Donaldsonville, to inform the authorities that, unless steps were taken to stop this useless and inhuman practice, the town would be held responsible. When passing up the river to the support of Baton Rouge, he anchored the Hartford two miles above Donaldsonville and heard them firing on vessels ascending the river (the transport, Sallie Robinson and the steamer Brooklyn), in the latter case, the enemy getting more than they bargained for and being driven to cover. The next night they fired upon the transport St. Charles. Farragut, in consequence of these wanton and useless attacks, notified the authorities to send their women and children out of the town as he intended to destroy it on his way down the river, and he fulfilled his threat to a certain extent. He burned the hotels and wharf buildings. also all buildings belo