Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Roddy or search for Roddy in all documents.

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oyed, and an engineer regiment, under command of Colonel Flad, engaged in its repair. Quite a considerable force of the enemy was in our front, near Tuscumbia, to resist our advance. It was commanded by General Stephen D. Lee, and composed of Roddy's and Furgeson's brigades, with irregular cavalry, amounting in the aggregate to about five thousand. In person I moved from Corinth to Burnsville on the eighteenth, and to Iuka on the nineteenth of October. Osterihau's division was in the m sixty feet long. The expedition crossed the river and drove off the rebels, taking their boats. From the best information to be obtained, there were two small regiments of cavalry and one battery on the other side, doing picket-duty. Lee and Roddy reported as having gone to Mississippi. Major-General Sherman, commanding army of the Tennessee, having been ordered, with the Fifteenth corps, to this point, to participate in the operations against the enemy, reached Bridgeport with two divi
aski, Tenn., having ascertained that a force of rebel cavalry under Roddy, was constructing flat-boats, and hiding them in Little Bear Creek, Spring Creek, and Town Creek, and also that one of Roddy's regiments was foraging on the north side of the Tennessee River, he immediately i me to organize an expedition at once, of sufficient force to drive Roddy away from where he was reported to be, and to destroy all boats and, information was received that Johnson's and Morrow's brigades, of Roddy's command, had crossed the Tennessee, somewhere between Florence anttack from this party, and measures were immediately taken to drive Roddy across the river. Colonel H. O. Miller, Seventy-second Indiana, coinely mounted. A scout also brought me information of an attack by Roddy, with a heavy force, upon our troops stationed at Lebanon, De Kalb ulsed, and driven in confusion towards Gadsden, when, learning that Roddy was being reenforced by Wheeler, our troops withdrew to Sand Mounta
ect with a force under General Stanley, sent out by General Thomas. Colonel Oliver reached the place without difficulty, but could learn nothing of Stanley's command, and returned. That night it was ascertained from different sources of information — deserters, prisoners, and refugees — that the enemy was preparing to attack him with a superior force. Two regiments of mounted infantry with two field-batteries, which were already moving from Kingston, a large cavalry force under Wheeler and Roddy, estimated at four thousand five hundred, together with the force which had fallen back before his advance, were to concentrate the next day at Town Creek, at an admirable place for offensive operations, and which he was obliged to pass on his return. Smith had nothing but infantry and cavalry; no artillery and no wagons in which to bring off his wounded in case of an engagement. He was then forty-two miles from the Tennessee, and from any reenforcements, and the enemy were in double his n