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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Theodore F. Rodenbough or search for Theodore F. Rodenbough in all documents.

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1: the evolution of the American cavalryman Theo. F. Rodenbough Union soldier with two horses. The first experiment: seventh New York cavalry, 1862 The men on dress parade here, in 1862, are much smarter, with their band and white gloves, their immaculate uniforms and horses all of one color, than the troopers in the field a year later. It was not known at that time how important a part the cavalry was to play in the great war. The organization of this three months regiment warch. The regiment was honorably discharged, and many of its members saw real service later. General I. N. Palmer, appears in the foreground with his staff, third from the left. Cavalry of the Civil War its evolution and influence Theo. F. Rodenbough, Brigadier-General, United States Army (Retired) It may surprise non-military readers to learn that the United States, unprepared as it is for war, and unmilitary as are its people, has yet become a model for the most powerful armies of
12. cavalry leaders North and South Theo. F. Rodenbough, Brigadier-General, United States Army (Retired) Custer and his dog Sheridan and his right-hand men This photograph shows Sheridan and his leaders, who drove Early and the Confederate cavalry from the Shenandoah Valley, and brought the Federal cavalry to the zenith of its power. Sheridan stands at the extreme left of the picture. Next to him is General Forsyth, and General Merritt is seated at the table. General Devin stands with his hand on his hip, and Custer leans easily back in his chair. This is a ceremonious photograph; each leader wears the uniform of his rank. Even Custer has abandoned his favorite velvet suit. together with the facing photograph, this offers an interesting study in the temperament of the Union cavalry leaders. A study in temperament of the men who led the Federal cavalry The photographer has evidently requested the distinguished sitters to inspect a map, as if they were p
13. famous chargers Theo. F. Rodenbough, Brigadier-General, United States Army (Retired) Grant's favorite war-horse Cincinnati Three chargers that bore a nation's destiny: in the field with General Grant. These three horses can fairly be said to have borne a nation's destiny upon their backs. They are the mounts used by General Grant in his final gigantic campaign that resulted in the outwearing of the Confederacy. When photographed in June, 1864, they were in the field with the General-in-Chief, after the ghastly battle of Cold Harbor, and before the crossing of the James River that sealed the fate of Lee's army. On the left is Egypt, presented to Grant by admirers in Illinois, and named for the district in which he was bred. The horse in the center, fully caparisoned, is Cincinnati, also a present from a gentleman in St. Louis, who on his death-bed sent for Grant and presented him with the finest horse in the world. The little black pony to the right is Jef