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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Robert E. Park, Macon, Georgia, late Captain Twelfth Alabama regiment, Confederate States army. (search)
oon at four o'clock; but at the appointed hour Rodes' division was hurriedly ordered out to meet th. Moore returned to camp. After the moon rose Rodes' division marched through Berryville, then hals large piercing blue eyes are really superb. Rodes' and Ramseur's divisions also crossed to the Vkees badly to-day in some severe skirmishing. Rodes, for a wonder, was not engaged. My good mother says Rodes' division is in every battle her papers mention, and that such expressions as Rodes boRodes bore the brunt of the battle, Rodes begun the action, Rodes' command suffered severely in killed and Rodes begun the action, Rodes' command suffered severely in killed and wounded, Rodes' division led the advance, or Rodes conducted the retreat, serving as rear guard, arRodes' command suffered severely in killed and wounded, Rodes' division led the advance, or Rodes conducted the retreat, serving as rear guard, are constantly in the telegraphic column, and to be found in Letters from war Correspondents. It is Rodes' division led the advance, or Rodes conducted the retreat, serving as rear guard, are constantly in the telegraphic column, and to be found in Letters from war Correspondents. It is true that our gallant and beloved Major-General is usually foremost at the post of honor and dangerRodes conducted the retreat, serving as rear guard, are constantly in the telegraphic column, and to be found in Letters from war Correspondents. It is true that our gallant and beloved Major-General is usually foremost at the post of honor and danger. He is ably seconded by his efficient adjutants, Major H. A. Whiting and Major Green Peyton. Rei
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.36 (search)
hrough the streets. Lieutenant J. P. Arrington, A. D. C. to Major-General Rodes, was severely wounded in the knee, and Colonel------, of Lou Yanks made no advance. August 31st Another reconnoissance by Rodes' division. General Rodes received orders to drive the Yankees out General Rodes received orders to drive the Yankees out of Martinsburg, and taking his division of Battle's Alabama, Cook's Georgia, Cox's North Carolina, and Lewis' (formerly Daniel's) North Caroland. Battle's brigade was in front, and was shelled severely. General Rodes seems to think his old brigade of Alabamians entitled to the pod. Still the men remain cheerful and hopeful. September 10th Rodes' division, preceded by our cavalry, under Generals Fitzhugh Lee andGeneral Garland, when an order from General D. H. Hill, through General Rodes to Colonel B. B. Gayle, of the Twelfth Alabama, directed that sxert a good influence over the tired soldiers. September 17th Rodes' and Gordon's divisions, with Braxton's artillery, marched to Bunke
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 21: (search)
ight show of resistance, and falling back slowly before us. By about four o'clock we had completed our movement without encountering any material obstacle, and reached a patch of wood in rear of the enemy's right wing, formed by the 11th corps, Howard's, which was encamped in a large open field not more than half a mile distant. Halting here, the cavalry threw forward a body of skirmishers to occupy the enemy's attention, while the divisions of Jackson's corps, A. P. Hill's, Colston's, and Rodes's, numbering in all about 28,000 men, moved into line of battle as fast as they arrived. Ordered to reconnoitre the position of the Federals, I rode cautiously forward through the forest, and reached a point whence I obtained a capital view of the greater part of their troops, whose attitude betokened how totally remote was any suspicion that a numerous host was so near at hand. It was evident that the whole movement we had thus so successfully executed was regarded as merely an unimpor
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 22: (search)
Germana plank-road-A. P. Hill's in the first line, Colston's in the second, and Rodes's in the third. The bulk of the artillery and cavalry were placed in reserve, eemed about to be lost. At this critical moment, we suddenly heard the yell of Rodes's division behind us, and saw these gallant troops, led by their heroic generalr extreme right, which had only been abandoned by the enemy after the charge of Rodes's division, twenty 12-pounder Napoleons played with a well-directed flank-fire my; and at earliest dawn on the 6th Jackson's corps received orders to advance, Rodes's division taking the lead. My own instructions from General Stuart having bee had not taken time to destroy. Just as I was entering the fortifications, General Rodes rode up, saying, I am sure the enemy is in full retreat, and is probably by rear at our request, as submissively as though they had been our own men. General Rodes and I in this way captured, merely our two selves, more than sixty of these
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 23: (search)
ch were rapidly filled by the return of the absentees, and strengthened by the arrival of numerous reinforcements-Longstreet having been recalled with his two divisions from North Carolina, and several brigades joined to these from Beauregard's army. The army of Northern Virginia was now divided into three equal and distinct corps, each numbering about 20,000 men. Longstreet commanded the 1st corps, consisting of Hood's, McLaws's, and Picket's divisions; Ewell the 2d, consisting of Early's, Rodes's, and Johnson's divisions, formerly under Jackson's command, and now committed to this general in accordance with a request made by Stonewall on his deathbed, in his solicitude for the welfare of his veterans. The 3d corps was placed under the command of A. P. Hill, and was formed of Anderson's, Pender's, and Heth's divisions. The cavalry, which had also been strengthened by several new brigades from the South, was formed into a separate corps of three divisions, commanded by Hampton, Fi
in Lynchburg of these facts, that fifteen trains of the Virginia and Alexandria Railroad (no one train of a capacity of carrying five hundred men) brought the whole of the Second Corps of the Confederate 90 Army under division commanders Gordon, Rodes, and Ramseur to this place: that Breckenridge's division, then here, was only about two thousand men: and that these were all of the infantry carried from this place by Early down the Valley after his chase of Hunter. It will thus be perceived tat, we can give statistics nearly official, procured from an officer of rank who held a high command during the campaign, and who had every opportunity of knowing. Early's infantry consisted of Gordon's Division2,000 Ramseur's Division2,000 Rodes' Division2,500 Breckenridge's Division1,800 Total Infantry8,300 Cavalry-Fitz Lee's Division Wickham's Brigade1,000 Lomax's old Brigade6000 Lomax's Division McCauseland's Brigade800 Johnson's Brigade700 Imboden's Brigade400 Jackson's Bri
It was this spectacle of gray nondescripts which aroused the general enthusiasm. As Stuart advanced, superb and smiling, with his brilliant blue eyes, his ebon plume, his crimson scarf, and his rattling sabre, in front of his men, the town, as I have said, grew wild. His hand was grasped by twenty persons; bright eyes greeted him; beautiful lips saluted him. Believe me, reader, it was something to be a soldier of the C. S. A., when the name of that soldier was Stuart, Jackson, Gordon, or Rodes. Fair hands covered them with flowers, cut off their coat-buttons, and caressed the necks of the horses which they rode. Better still than that, pure hearts offered prayers for them; when they fell, the brightest eyes were wet with tears. Most striking of all scenes of that pageant of rejoicing at Middleburg, was the ovation in front of a school of young girls. The house had poured out, as from a cornucopia, a great crowd of damsels, resembling, in their variegated dresses, a veritab
the enemy's right. Every preparation was made that night, and on the morning of May second, Jackson set out with Hill's, Rodes's, and Colston's divisions, in all about twenty-two thousand men, to accomplish his undertaking. Chancellorsville was was reached at about five in the evening, and without a moment's delay Jackson formed his line of battle for an attack. Rodes's division moved in front, supported at an interval of two hundred yards by Colston's, and behind these A. P. Hill's divi by General Howard, and, completely surprised, they retreated in confusion upon the heavy works around Chancellorsville. Rodes and Colston followed them, took possession of the breastworks across the road, and a little after eight o'clock the Confe vigour, and an obvious determination to strain every nerve, and incur every hazard to accomplish so decisive a success. Rodes and Colston were directed to retire a short disstance, and re-form their lines, now greatly mingled, and Hill was ordered
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Morale of General Lee's army. (search)
vements, and the influence which he exerted for the religious good of his officers and men can never be fully known in this world. These noble leaders had at the first the co-operation of such Christian soldiers as Generals D. H. Hill, T. R. Cobb, A. H. Colquitt, J. E. B. Stuart, W. N. Pendleton, John B. Gordon, C. A. Evans, John Pegram, and a large number of other general, field, staff, and subordinate officers; and, during the war, Generals Ewell, Longstreet, Hood, Pender, R. H. Anderson, Rodes, Paxton, Baylor, and a number of others made professions of religion. Of the first four companies from Georgia, which arrived in Virginia, three of the captains were earnest Christians, and fifty of one of the companies belonged to one church. I remember one single regiment which reported over four hundred church members, when it first came into service, and another regiment which contained five ministers of the Gospel — a chaplain, one captain, and three privates. I have not space to
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The campaign in Pennsylvania. (search)
column in that direction. When within a few miles of the town, General Rodes, whose division was in advance, was made aware, by the sharp cas for battle to be made. On reaching the scene of conflict, General Rodes made his disposition to assail the force with which Hill's troo of Ewell's Corps, reached the field with his division, moved in on Rodes' left, and attacked the enemy with his accustomed vigor and impetuolls Corps, had meanwhile been advanced to relieve that of Heth; and Rodes, observing the effect of Early's attack, ordered his line forward. visions of Heth and Pender, of Hill's Corps, and those of Early and Rodes, of Ewell's Corps. On the side of the Federals there was the Firstwn of day on the second. The divisions of Major Generals Early and Rodes, of Ewell's Corps, had been actively engaged, and had sustained soms of colors. In explanation of this lack of expected support, General Rodes, who was on General Early's right, states in his report, that a
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