Browsing named entities in Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence. You can also browse the collection for Rodes or search for Rodes in all documents.

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Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 21: (search)
ight show of resistance, and falling back slowly before us. By about four o'clock we had completed our movement without encountering any material obstacle, and reached a patch of wood in rear of the enemy's right wing, formed by the 11th corps, Howard's, which was encamped in a large open field not more than half a mile distant. Halting here, the cavalry threw forward a body of skirmishers to occupy the enemy's attention, while the divisions of Jackson's corps, A. P. Hill's, Colston's, and Rodes's, numbering in all about 28,000 men, moved into line of battle as fast as they arrived. Ordered to reconnoitre the position of the Federals, I rode cautiously forward through the forest, and reached a point whence I obtained a capital view of the greater part of their troops, whose attitude betokened how totally remote was any suspicion that a numerous host was so near at hand. It was evident that the whole movement we had thus so successfully executed was regarded as merely an unimpor
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 22: (search)
Germana plank-road-A. P. Hill's in the first line, Colston's in the second, and Rodes's in the third. The bulk of the artillery and cavalry were placed in reserve, eemed about to be lost. At this critical moment, we suddenly heard the yell of Rodes's division behind us, and saw these gallant troops, led by their heroic generalr extreme right, which had only been abandoned by the enemy after the charge of Rodes's division, twenty 12-pounder Napoleons played with a well-directed flank-fire my; and at earliest dawn on the 6th Jackson's corps received orders to advance, Rodes's division taking the lead. My own instructions from General Stuart having bee had not taken time to destroy. Just as I was entering the fortifications, General Rodes rode up, saying, I am sure the enemy is in full retreat, and is probably by rear at our request, as submissively as though they had been our own men. General Rodes and I in this way captured, merely our two selves, more than sixty of these
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 23: (search)
ch were rapidly filled by the return of the absentees, and strengthened by the arrival of numerous reinforcements-Longstreet having been recalled with his two divisions from North Carolina, and several brigades joined to these from Beauregard's army. The army of Northern Virginia was now divided into three equal and distinct corps, each numbering about 20,000 men. Longstreet commanded the 1st corps, consisting of Hood's, McLaws's, and Picket's divisions; Ewell the 2d, consisting of Early's, Rodes's, and Johnson's divisions, formerly under Jackson's command, and now committed to this general in accordance with a request made by Stonewall on his deathbed, in his solicitude for the welfare of his veterans. The 3d corps was placed under the command of A. P. Hill, and was formed of Anderson's, Pender's, and Heth's divisions. The cavalry, which had also been strengthened by several new brigades from the South, was formed into a separate corps of three divisions, commanded by Hampton, Fi