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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
was a long one, and the perfect co-operation in the attack needed, to prevent General Meade, whose line was a short one, from using the same troops at more than one point, was difficult of attainment. Two of the corps commanders, Hill and Ewell, were new in their places. Longstreet's attack on the Federal left on the 2d was delayed beyond the expected time, and was not promptly seconded by Hill and Ewell when made. Ewell's divisions were not made to act in concert — Johnson, Early, Rodes acting in succession. General Lee always expressed the strongest conviction that had the Confederate corps attacked General Meade simultaneously on either the 2d or 3d, he would have succeeded in overthrowing the Federal army; that he had used every effort to insure concert of action, but had failed. He said that he had consulted Ewell, and told him if he could not carry his part of the line, he would move his corps to the right of Longstreet, and threaten the Federal communications with
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Garland's report of the battle of seven Pines. (search)
ad on my extreme right, I could not superintend it. In the foregoing order, upon hearing the signal the line of skirmishers promptly advanced into the woods in front, and the brigade followed, moving by the right flanks of regiments at deploying distance and taking direction from the right, which was ordered to keep in a short distance of the Williamsburg road. Meanwhile, General Featherston's brigade (Colonel Anderson commanding) moved a quarter of a mile in rear as a support, whilst General Rodes and General Raines moved in corresponding position on the opposite side of the road. My line of skirmishers had advanced only a few hundred yards when they encountered that of the enemy. The difficulties of the ground were almost insurmountable. The recent rains had formed ponds of water throughout the woods with mud at the bottom, through which the men waded forward knee-deep and occasionally sinking to the hips in boggy places almost beyond the point of extrication. The forest wa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign. (search)
hed my brigade and rejoined the division, from which we had been separated since June 26th. Marching thence to Gettysburg, we participated in the battle of July 1st. In accordance with orders from Major-General Early, I formed my brigade in line of battle on the right of the division--one regiment, the Twenty-sixth Georgia, having been detached to support the artillery under Lieutenant-Colonel Jones. About 3 o'clock P. M. I was ordered to move my brigade forward to the support of Major-General Rodes' left. The men were much fatigued from long marches, and I therefore caused them to move forward slowly, until within about three hundred yards of the enemy's line, when the advance was as rapid as the nature of the ground and a proper regard for the preservation of my alignment would permit. The enemy had succeeded in gaining a position upon the left flank of Doles' brigade, and in causing these troops to retreat. This movement of the enemy would necessarily have exposed his rig
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel Winston's Correction corrected. (search)
timate of loss (680) was less than the loss as stated officially by General Johnson's Assistant Adjutant-General, viz: 682. The losses in Daniel's brigade were heavier, but were incurred chiefly in the first day's battle, as may be seen from General Rodes' report (September number, 1876, Historical Society Papers, page 149, compared with ditto, page 172). Rodes' division lost 2,869 in the entire three days battle, of which number 2,500 were lost on the first day. Randolph H. McKim. New York, 680) was less than the loss as stated officially by General Johnson's Assistant Adjutant-General, viz: 682. The losses in Daniel's brigade were heavier, but were incurred chiefly in the first day's battle, as may be seen from General Rodes' report (September number, 1876, Historical Society Papers, page 149, compared with ditto, page 172). Rodes' division lost 2,869 in the entire three days battle, of which number 2,500 were lost on the first day. Randolph H. McKim. New York, May 13th, 1879.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of operations of General John C. Breckinridge. (search)
lley. For purposes of better organization, he turned over to General Early all the cavalry, of which two brigades had arrived from Southwest Virginia--Vaughan's and McCausland's (late Jenkins'). In lieu of this, Major-General J. B. Gordon's division of infantry was assigned to him, and with Echols' division (Echols' and Wharton's brigades) formed into a corps — so that Early's command at this time consisted as follows: Breckinridge's corps of Echols' and Gordon's divisions, Early's corps of Rodes' and Ramseur's divisions, with a corps of cavalry commanded by General Ransom, the constitution or numbers of which I cannot give accurately. There were W. L. Jackson's brigade, McCausland's brigade, Vaughan's brigade, Imboden's brigade, and a number of smaller organization, the whole being about three thousand cavalry, most of it known as wild cavalry — of the inefficiency of which there was constant complaint and almost daily exhibition. The infantry numbered about eight thousand, and we
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragrpahs. (search)
bers, when it was wrested from its grasp by a flank and rear movement of the enemy's cavalry, which alone considerably outnumbered Early's whole army. Indeed, as one looks out on this beautiful landscape, every hill, and valley, and stream, and hamlet, seems redolent with memories of those stirring movements by which Winchester changed hands no less than eighty-three times during the war, and we can almost see Johnston, Jackson, Stuart, Ewell, Ashby, A. P. Hill, Early, Breckinridge, Gordon, Rodes, Ramseur, Pegram, and other chieftians leading their brave men to the onset. How appropriate that, amid such scenes as these, a monument should be reared to the unknown and unrecorded dead of the rank and file who followed these splendid leaders. But above all, there stands hard by the heroic old town of Winchester, whose people, from 1861 to 1865, threw open their doors to the Confederate soldier, and esteemed it a sweet privilege to share with him their last crust of bread, and whose
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Williamsburg--reply to Colonel Bratton. (search)
enemy concentrating their overwhelming volleys upon it, as it came off through the open field ; and it is poor consolation now to find out that besides it and the Twenty-fourth Virginia, that the Sixth South Carolina was also used up. There is no doubt the brigade of General Hancock was in our hands. Besides the two regiments of Early's brigade, which were not called on to do any work, and Calonel Bratton's regiment, in immediate presence of the disaster, General Hill had two brigades — Rodes' and Rains'--in easy reach, and Hancock was out of reach of support. He could easily have been taken in flank while the Fifth North Carolina was in his front. Napoleon, with the same opportunity, would have made short work of it. For myself I make no claim to military renown on the occasion referred to. I moved without discretion, under orders of superior officers — no suggestion made by me was acted on by General Hill--and both of those officers have long since exonerated me from all r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
ent on Jones' front, embracing the Funkstown and Cavetown roads. On the 12th firing began early, and the enemy having advanced on several roads on Hagerstown, our cavalry forces retired with-out serious resistance, and massed on the left of the main body, reaching with heavy outposts the Conococheague on the National road. The infantry having already had time to entrench themselves, it was no longer desirable to defer the enemy's attack. The 13th was spent in reconnoitring on the left-Rodes' division occupying the extreme left of our infantry, very near Hagerstown, a little north of the National road. Cavalry pickets were extended beyond the railroad leading to Chambersburg, and everything put in readiness to resist the enemy's attack. The situation of our communications south of the Potomac caused the Commanding-General to desire more cavalry on that side, and accordingly Brigadier-General Jones' brigade (one of whose regiments, Twelfth Virginia cavalry, had been left in J
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official diary of First corps, A. N. V., while commanded by Lieutenant-General R. H. Anderson, from May 7th to 31st, 1864. (search)
Fifth corps (Warren's). Ewell's corps arrives in the afternoon, and the enemy makes another attack on our position with their Sixth corps, which is also repulsed, Rodes' division being thrown on Kershaw's right and relieving the attack. Commanding-General arrives with Ewell. May 9th Quiet in morning. Troops in line all dayart of the line by the enemy being driven from the ground they had gained, with the exception of a small part. During the action Wofford is sent to the support of Rodes. Between 9 and 10 o'clock A. M. Field sustains two violent assaults on a part of his line, which are again easily repulsed with great loss to the enemy. In the achimney knocked over our party. At night the line is somewhat retired. Pickett reports to Hill. May 24th Day occupied in examining and improving the line. Rodes posted on our right, and at night Early and Gordon sent to his right. During the night the line is straightened by cutting off the angle near Law's brigade. Ma
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official diary of First corps, A. N. V., while commanded by Lt.-General R. H. Anderson, from June 1st to October 18, 1864. (search)
miles and a half of Charlestown and halts for the night. Casualties in all the skirmishes light. August 22 March resumed at daylight for Charlestown. Meet General Early. Latter's troops encamped in front of Charlestown, ours back on the road we came, about two miles and a half from town. August 23 Without change. August 24 In the afternoon the enemy makes a slight demonstration with his cavalry on Early. August 25 Kershaw moves at daylight with Cuttshaw to relieve Rodes and Ramseur. Early's force moves to threaten Martinsburg, and Fitz. Lee (who has resumed command of all the cavalry) towards Williamsport. August 26 Enemy in position and quiet until afternoon about 5 o'clock, when he advances four or five regiments of infantry and one of cavalry to feel our lines. The picket line of the Fifteenth South Carolina regiment, Kershaw's brigade, breaks, and about a hundred men of it are captured. The enemy soon retires. During the night we hear from Ear
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