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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 5: Seven Pines or fair Oaks (search)
n our extreme right on the Williamsburg road. Rodes was on picket on the Charles City road, not faally turn up fated to cause unexpected delay. Rodes is ordered to be relieved by a brigade of Huger to go down the Charles City road and relieve Rodes, after which it will guard and protect Hill's knew that one of Huger's brigades must relieve Rodes's brigade, on the Charles City road, and let iurt was never held. About 1 P. M., however, Rodes's brigade was relieved on the Charles City roaades on the left of the road as soon as he saw Rodes approaching. The formation was Garland's br left of the road, followed by G. B. Anderson; Rodes's brigade on the right, followed by Rains. Eapointment and says that Rains might have saved Rodes's brigade from suffering 500 casualties. RaNTKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGtotalPERCENT Front rightRodes22002418535109950 Front leftGarland20659860042fficial reports give an idea of the fighting. Rodes writes:— The total number of men carried i
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 7 (search)
er's, were en route to him, but were yet too far off to lend any aid. But Lee, at last, was putting forth his whole strength. He issued orders for an advance of every command, regardless of the troops upon its right or left. A general advance was made, not simultaneous in its beginnings, but pressed to success by Whiting's two brigades supported by Longstreet on our extreme right, by Lawton's and Winder's brigades in the centre, and by D. H. Hill with Garland's and parts of Ripley's and Rodes's brigades upon our left. Had it been made two hours earlier, the fruits of the victory would have been important. As it was, they were so trifling as scarcely to be worth mention. Porter fell back in fairly good order under cover of his superior artillery, and our artillery could not be gotten forward across the swamps. Blessed night, for which the defeated pray, had let down her mantle while the firing was still severe, and before we could even feel fully assured of our victory. Und
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 9 (search)
in our rear, I galloped back to it and found it to be that of Gen. Toombs. I ordered it forward to support Garland, and accompanied it. The brigade advanced handsomely to the brow of the hill, but soon retreated in disorder. Gordon, commanding Rodes's brigade, pushed gallantly forward and gained considerable ground, but was forced back. The gallant and accomplished Meares, 3d N. C., Ripley's brigade, had fallen at the head of his regiment, and that brigade was streaming to the rear. Colquilery in Poindexter's field. Including with these the losses in Jackson's and Ewell's divisions and Lawton's brigade, the casualties were 599. In Magruder's division the casualties were 2014, and in Huger's, including Ransom's brigade, 1609. In Rodes's, Colquitt's, and Ripley's brigades of D. H. Hill's division, the casualties were making 889, a total, so far, of 5111. The other two brigades, Anderson's and Garland's, report only their total casualties for the campaign as 863 and 844, a tota
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 12: Boonsboro or South Mountain, and Harper's Ferry (search)
nch, Archer, Gregg, Pender, Field, Thomas7 JacksonWinder, Jones, J. K., Taliaferro, Starke6 Hill, D. H.Ripley, Garland, Rodes, Anderson, G. B. Colquitt4 Total 2d Corps4 Divisions19 Brigades, 24 Batteries, 100 Guns24 ArtilleryPendletonPendleton'sever would have been fought. On the arrival of the head of Longstreet's column, Evans was sent to the left to support Rodes, and Kemper, Jenkins, and Picketts were sent to the right at the foot of the mountain, by a rough road, to meet a force othey were at once sharply engaged. Longstreet writes:— They were put in as they arrived to try to cover the right of Rodes and Evans, and fill the intervening space to the turnpike. As they marched the men dropped along the road as rapidly as orts were made by the Confederate cavalry. The Confederate casualties at Boonsboro are not reported separately, except Rodes's brigade, which reports: killed 61, wounded 151, missing 204, total 522. It was most severely engaged of any, except,
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 13: Sharpsburg or Antietam (search)
original five brigades, —G. B. Anderson, comparatively fresh, and Rodes who had been severely engaged at Boonsboro, losing one-third of histion of the sunken lane could be enfiladed. This being reported to Rodes by the Lt.-Col. of the 6th Ala., he was directed to throw his right wing back and out of the road. Rodes reports :— Instead of executing the order he moved briskly to the rear of the regiment and gave throm the Hagerstown road. When, by this misunderstanding between Rodes and Lt.-Col. Lightfoot, Rodes's brigade abandoned this sunken road,Rodes's brigade abandoned this sunken road, —ever since known as The Bloody Lane,—Lee's army was ruined and the end of the Confederacy was in sight. Even the rank and file in the 5th ed on, but he did not come and he issued no order. The gap left by Rodes was speedily filled by the encouraged Federals, and now the whole l17700 D. H. Hill's Div. Ripley110506124740 Garland46210187443 Rodes111289225625 Anderson64299202565 Colquitt129518184831 Hill's
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 14: fall of 1862 (search)
d ARTILLERYPRESENT for duty Hood'sTotal carried forward Law's, Robertson's, Anderson's, Benning's23,104 Unorganized Artillery, 3 Batteries, 14 Guns7,334 Walker's Ransom's, Cooke's, No Artillery3,855 Reserve ArtilleryAlexander's Battalion. 6 Batteries, 26 Guns623 Washington Artillery. 4 Batteries, 9 Guns Total5 Divisions, 20 Brigades 24 Batteries, 99 Guns29,916 2D corps, Jackson's Ewell'sLawton's, Early's, Trimble's, Hays's, Latimer's Battalion 6 Batteries, 26 Guns7,716 D. H. Hill'sRodes's, Dole's, Colquitt's, Iverson's, Ramseur's H. P. Jones's Battalion, 5 Batteries, 22 Guns6,944 A. P. Hill'sField's, Gregg's, Thomas's, Lane's, Archer's, Pender's Walker's Battalion, 7 Batteries, 28 Guns11,554 Taliaferro'sPaxton's, J. R. Jones's, Warren's, Pendleton's Brockenbrough's Battalion, 5 Batteries, 22 Guns5,478 Total4 Divisions, 18 Brigades, 23 Batteries, 98 Guns31,692 Stuart's Cavalry Brigades, Hampton's, Lee F., Lee, W. H. F., Jones's, W. E.; Pelham's Artillery 5 Batteries, 22
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 15: Chancellorsville (search)
th, Thomas, Lane, McGowans, Archer, Pender626 Rodes's9,632Rodes, Colquitt, Ramseur, Doles, IversonRodes, Colquitt, Ramseur, Doles, Iverson418 Early's8,243Gordon, Hoke, Smith, Hays418 Colston's6,629Paxton, Jones, Warren, Nichols418 900s three remaining divisions, under A. P. Hill, Rodes, and Colston. He was joined on the road in thbout one hour high, Jackson gave the signal to Rodes to move forward. His brigades were in the foln the morning in getting the column formed. Rodes reports it about 8 A. M. before the start was d, and allowed A. P. Hill's division to follow Rodes and Colston in column from the first, as they by a fragment of shell, and sent for Stuart. Rodes ranked Stuart, but the latter was not only bes to the army, but was of great popularity, and Rodes cheerfully acquiesced. His whole career, untiA. P. Hill's Div.4362,3302122,97810,400 Ala. Rodes's Brig.90538188816 Ga. Doles's Brig.663432846733073470 N. C. Ramseur's Brig.151529108788 Rodes's Div.3831,8687092,9609,600 Ga. Gordon's Bri[7 more...]
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 16: Gettysburg: the first day (search)
Johnson5,564 Stuart, Walker, Nichols, Jones Rodes8,454 Daniel, Doles, Iverson, Ramseur, O'Neal Culpeper. Hood and McLaws marched on the 3d, Rodes on the 4th, and Early and Johnson on the 5th. , Ewell's corps left Culpeper for the Valley. Rodes moved to Berryville, while Early and Johnson a with the loss of about 2400 men and 23 guns. Rodes's division, going by Berryville, had driven th at night. On the 15th, starting at 10 A. M., Rodes reached Williamsport at dark and at once cross upon Winchester, made 70 miles in three days. Rodes speaks of his march to Williamsport as— thtysburg, Ewell having at an early hour ordered Rodes and Early to diverge to that point from the rooon received a reinforcement by the arrival of Rodes's division, on his left flank, coining in fromrs at the actual points of contact, where only Rodes's and Heth's divisions were yet engaged. And, held a long conference with Ewell, Early, and Rodes, who urged, instead, that Longstreet should at
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 17: Gettysburg: second day (search)
hnson's assault. Early's attack. Federal account. Rodes's failure to advance. Rodes's New position. Rodes'Rodes's New position. Rodes's summary, second day. Longstreet, riding ahead of his approaching troops, met Lee upon Seminary Ridge aboutRodes's summary, second day. Longstreet, riding ahead of his approaching troops, met Lee upon Seminary Ridge about dawn on July 2. Daylight disclosed the enemy in his position overlooking the town, and it was apparent that hgade brought off four stands of captured colors. Gen. Rodes did not advance for reasons given in his report. d less than an hour. It only remains to show why Rodes failed to cooperate with Early and Johnson as Ewell two brigades were ready to advance when ordered. Rodes had remained about the northwestern edge of the towns and Early's attacks were begun and finished before Rodes had reached the enemy's skirmish line. Finding thuch faulty locations escaped notice and correction. Rodes's report not only shows the badness of his original which I could readily attack without confusion. Rodes's description of his new position is of special inte
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 18: Gettysburg: third day (search)
me time. The latter during the night reenforced Johnson with two brigades from Rodes's and one from Early's division. This statement shows that the strongest fehe impregnable character of the two Federal flanks. The two brigades sent from Rodes to reenforce Johnson were taken from the new position discovered by him early iwas sent from a force which could have effectively cooperated with an attack by Rodes. The effect of sending the three brigades was to emasculate the centre of our d within about 500 yards of its west face is the sheltered position occupied by Rodes the night of July 2d, which has already been mentioned. From nowhere else wa artillery with an escort of one brigade was sent to cross the pontoon bridge. Rodes's report describes the fording of the Potomac, as follows:— My division wad Doles2412431179 Ramseur2312232177 O'Neal73430193696 Carter's Arty.6352465 Rodes's Div.4211,7287042,853 Brown's Arty.31922 Nelson's Arty. Reserve Arty.31922
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