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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), James Louis Petigru, (search)
ss, I had determined, if I could get possession of the Columbia bridge, to cross my division over the Susquehannah. Ewells possibilities. General Ewell reached Carlisle on the 27th, and writes (p. 443): From Carlisle I sent forward my engineer, Captain H. B. Richardson, with Jenkins' cavalry, to reconnoitre the defences of Harrisburg and was starting on the 29th for that place, when ordered by the General commanding to join the main body of the army at Cashtown, near Gettysburg. General Rodes writes (p. 552): On the arrival at Carlisle, Jenkins' cavalry advanced towards Harrisburg and had, on the 29th, made a thorough reconnoisance of the defenses of the place, with the view of our advance upon it, a step which every man in the division contemplated with eagerness, and which was to have been executed on the 30th. Ewell, therefore, must have known that the river was fordable above and below the city, and something of the number and quality of the troops defending it. With
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
epted by Dr. McGuire: The occurrence was at the battle of South Mountain, September 14, 1862. Colonel, then Major, Hobson was in command of the 5th Alabama, Rodes' Brigade. Colonel John B. Gordon had been placed by General D. H. Hill, the division commander, to prevent a flank movement by the enemy. The enemy was steadily advancing on the line of Rodes, and at the distance of 100 yards menaced a charge. An officer, mounted on a white horse in front, was impetuously urging them onward. The potent incitation was manifest to Major Hobson, and in the crisis, he felt the necessity of removing the officer. He at once selected skilled riflemen to pick plans, that on his return he passed Fitz Lee without saluting or even thanking him, and when he reached the column, he ordered one aide to go forward and tell General Rodes, who was in the lead, to cross the Plank Road and go straight on to the Turnpike, and another aide to go to the rear of the column and see that it was kept clo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
, to which the 23d belonged. Samuel Garland, Jr., a Virginian, now commanded the brigade. The four brigades of Garland, Rodes, Anderson and Rains stormed the enemy's camp and captured everything as it stood, with twelve pieces of artillery, while as commanded by General Alfred Iverson, a Georgian. After the battle of Sharpsburg, and while around Fredericksburg, General Rodes commanded the division. At Chancellorsville the regiment was on the extreme left, and was conspicuous in turning thein time to return to the army before Gettysburg. The loss in the 23d at Chancellorsville was officially reported by General Rodes, as 173 killed, wounded and missing. Among the killed was Captain James S. Knight, of Rockingham, Richmond county. onel Robert D. Johnston, of Lincoln county, N. C., was placed in command of the brigade, the division being commanded by Rodes. Gettysburg had proved to be the lion in the path of General Lee's march into the enemy's country, and he soon fell ba
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Raleigh E. Colston, C. S. Army. (search)
ll Jackson ordered his corps of 26,000 men to disclose their presence in rear of the right flank of General Hooker's grand army, Jackson's command was formed, with Rodes' division in front, Trimble's division under Colston (Trimble being disabled), in the second line two yards in the rear, and A. P. Hill's division in supporting dimen burst with a cheer upon the startled enemy, and like a disciplined thunderbolt, swept down his line and captured cannon before they could be reversed to fire. Rodes, who led with so much spirit, said, that the enemy taken in flank and rear, did not wait for an attack. Colston's division followed so rapidly, that it went over the enemy's work at Lodall's Tavern with Rodes' troops, and both divisions. fought with mixed ranks until dark. These extracts are from General Fitzhugh Lee's life of General Lee, in which he gives a graphic and picturesque account of this great event, which rounded out and finished the career of Stonewall Jackson. Colston was